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31 votes
Accepted

Is it incorrect to say I'm 20 years old next month?

You certainly can use the present tense (I am, he is, we are, etc) about a scheduled event, and many people do so when discussing a forthcoming birthday. I am sixty tomorrow, I am fifty in March, I am ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
18 votes

Is it incorrect to say I'm 20 years old next month?

Want to add to the accepted answer: using the present tense to speak about future events is common, but to my intuitive understanding as a native US speaker is incorrect... except that it's understood ...
neph's user avatar
  • 360
18 votes
Accepted

Can we use "will" to describe future plans?

This video is a little bit right and a lot wrong. It's a little right in that we don't use "will" to indicate that we're talking about firm plans. "Will" is for believed or ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
13 votes
Accepted

"Will you work this evening?" vs "Will you be working this evening?"

When asking about arrangements we usually use the present continuous: Are you working tonight? When asking people to make a decision about something in the future we use will: Will you work tonight?...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Is 'make sure no one knows you are playing this game' grammatically weird?

You're chopping the meat much too finely. (I hope that that expression makes sense.) The actions occur at approximately the same time, and there is no need to use different tenses for actions that are ...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
9 votes

"....in 10 days" or ".....after 10 days."

OP is mistaken in thinking that native Anglophones wouldn't say I will fly to London after 10 days. The only relevant factor here is that after [some amount of time] requires a context within which ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
9 votes

Is 'make sure no one knows you are playing this game' grammatically weird?

Sentence 2 sounds perfectly natural and is the normal way to phrase it. Sentence 3 does not sound natural or fluent. The imperative is kind of "timeless": it is saying "make sure ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.9k
5 votes

"Will you work this evening?" vs "Will you be working this evening?"

You should use the second option ("be working"). Will you work tonight? sounds rather rude, because it sounds like you are asking if they are planning on actually doing their job—as if you ...
randomhead's user avatar
  • 21.1k
5 votes

Planned Leave: Simple Present vs Future

Both are correct. You can use the simple present for events, actions, or situations that are scheduled or planned, as your leave is. You can also correctly use the future tense. Talking about the ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
5 votes

Can we use "will" to describe future plans?

"Will" is generally used for statements of fact or high certainty statements about the future. The sun [will/should/might] rise at 5:43 am tomorrow. You use "will" if you're ...
NotThatGuy's user avatar
5 votes

"we will have picked you up in two hours”

There are four possible ways of completing this sentence, which tells me that the author did not think this through. OK, we'll be leaving you here and picking you up in two hours when we get back ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.4k
5 votes

"It'll be the first time he has met his dad." / "........ he meets his dad." / ".........he'll meet his dad."

To add to FumbleFingers' answer, note that there are in fact two tenses operating at the same time. We can see that more clearly if we rewrite the idea and break it into two sentences: Soon Zack will ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

"It'll be the first time he has met his dad." / "........ he meets his dad." / ".........he'll meet his dad."

It is common to use the present perfect to refer to something which has happened before now or which has never happened before now: They have met. They have never met. They have been introduced to ...
TimR on some device's user avatar
4 votes

"....in 10 days" or ".....after 10 days."

Breaking it down: The vaccination was in April. You could get the booster after six months [had passed]. In other words, as of September onwards. Likewise: They will continue until 12 December, but ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.8k
4 votes

"Here is what I'm going to do" vs. "here is what I'll do" in context

Both are appropriate, and the difference is very subtle - in many instances, borderline nonexistent. There are differences between "will" and "going to," as you know, and this ...
cruthers's user avatar
  • 3,408
4 votes

I will tell him what my schedule "is/will be" like - the differences?

In example 1 the schedule has not yet been established. In example 2 it’s already (at the moment that the sentence itself is uttered) set, and the only thing that hasn’t happened yet is the describing ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Does the present simple have future meaning in these sentences?

No, they don't have the same meaning. When the present simple has a future meaning, it is used for scheduled future events, like a train's departure time or a regular event: My train leaves at 8:42 ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
3 votes
Accepted

I have confusion with this sentence. "I think, It will be one of the best tutorial course ever published here "

The phrase ever published means "published at any time". The word published is an adjective formed from the past participle of the verb; it is not a tensed form of the verb. P.S. You can think of the ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
3 votes

"....in 10 days" or ".....after 10 days."

I think the distinction here is when you start counting. "I will fly to London in ten days' time" means ten days from now, the time of speaking. If you want to start counting the ten days ...
Especially Lime's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

The Present Simple is used as a condition. Why not 'will'?

We don't use will in any of your examples, partly because we don't use the future tense in the if-clause or when-clause of conditional sentences, and partly because of how we think and talk about time ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.9k
3 votes
Accepted

How could we rephrase this sentence about a possible future?

You don't need to use "get" here. It's redundant. The rest of the sentence is incorrect. Here's my suggestion If I can't make it to the party, I still want to wish (my friend/you/him/her) ...
Billy Kerr's user avatar
  • 3,754
3 votes

Why do we use the future with will when we say "I'll be in London next week" when things have already been planned, instead of "be going to"?

There is a lot of overlap between the "will" future and the "going to" future. In many situations, both are possible and both are correct. In the examples you give "I'm going ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
3 votes

future perfect or future simple

"In ten or twenty years' time their situation will change" means that the change in their situation is taking place in ten or twenty years, while "their situation will have changed"...
Esther's user avatar
  • 1,670
3 votes

Is it correct to say "If you changed your mind"?

All your sentences are wrong, it should be: If you change your mind tomorrow, call me. If it is open tomorrow, buy another one for me. If it is closed next week, forget it forever. I will see you ...
DialFrost's user avatar
  • 8,011
3 votes

The use of the present simple and the future simple after "if-clauses" when making threats

To me, the second (I will file) is natural, except that nearly any English speaker will say I'll file, unless they are stressing "will" (I will file). The first (I file) seems odd to me, and ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.9k
3 votes

I can't understand how this sentence is grammatically correct: "I miss my dad more than I will miss anything."

The first sentence has good grammar, but I can't think of how it could be meaningful. It refers to "more than I missed anything", suggesting that the speaker stopped missing things some time ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
3 votes

Can we use "will" to describe future plans?

The video is wrong. I watched the first part of that video. The speaker is simply wrong, in several areas. First, let's get this out of the way: There are formal and constrained versions of language ...
fectin's user avatar
  • 612
3 votes

If we must take the train to the place, we will have to wake up early that day. - "Should" in if-clause to mean "have to"?

No, they don't. If we should [do something] means "If it so happens that we do it", not "if we are obliged to do it". If you should see John, will you give him my regards?
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.7k
3 votes

In 4 years, you will meet a guy who "graduated / has graduated" from Yale university. - confused about the meaning

If we are being picky, and writing "for the test" then use a future perfect: In four years you'll meet a guy who will have graduated Otherwise both would probably be understood given the ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k

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