13 votes
Accepted

"Will you work this evening?" vs "Will you be working this evening?"

When asking about arrangements we usually use the present continuous: Are you working tonight? When asking people to make a decision about something in the future we use will: Will you work tonight?...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
8 votes

Which sentence is most appropriate? "Next year Anny and I {will have been / will be} married for 25 years"

English does not have a future tense, but some forms involving will, shall, and be going to are labelled as such. See discussion of future forms here. I'll use that terminology here. Next year ...
fixer1234's user avatar
  • 5,696
8 votes

Will you be having cake?

This answer is from a British perspective: I don't know whether the situation is similar in the US or other English speaking countries. It is necessary to consider the first question in two different ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.6k
8 votes

Don‘t worry I won‘t be reading that

Probably not, but it would depend on what kind of letter this was. The only time you would say, "I won't be doing X" is when there is some expectation, or possibility that you ordinarily ...
Juhasz's user avatar
  • 9,794
6 votes

Don‘t worry I won‘t be reading that

This is more suited to Interpersonal Skills SE, but I personally would not mention the letter. She does not need to know you did not intend to look at it. It's her private letter. To mention it would ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
5 votes

Will you be having cake?

To the question, "Will you be having cake?" answering, "yes I will do" does not sound correct in AmE -- but it wouldn't surprise me coming out of the mouth of a British speaker (as related to some ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.3k
5 votes

"Will you work this evening?" vs "Will you be working this evening?"

You should use the second option ("be working"). Will you work tonight? sounds rather rude, because it sounds like you are asking if they are planning on actually doing their job—as if you ...
randomhead's user avatar
  • 21.1k
4 votes

Which sentence is most appropriate? "Next year Anny and I {will have been / will be} married for 25 years"

The perfect Will have been changes the perspective to a present located in the future, from which present a past is to be viewed reaching back into time. Will be, on the other hand, talks about the ...
P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica's user avatar
4 votes

Will you be having cake?

I'll give you an analysis of how each one sounds to me (a 20-something Brit) Will you be having cake? Yes, thank you. Polite way of accepting cake. Yes, I will. Probably ...
Muzer's user avatar
  • 970
3 votes

Which sentence is most appropriate? "Next year Anny and I {will have been / will be} married for 25 years"

Next year Anny and I will have been married for 25 years. Next year Anny and I will be married for 25 years. The way I see it, the second sentence is wrong if speaking about a state that is on-going ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Can we combine Future Continuous with Present Simple into grammatically correct sentence?

Yes, that's fine. I will be watching TV when you get home.
chasly - supports Monica's user avatar
3 votes

Past continuous vs future continuous

What did you do last week A simple question. No tricks. The questioner doesn't suppose much. What were you doing last week The continuous suggests you are asking about some ongoing activity - so ...
James K's user avatar
  • 218k
2 votes

What is the difference between 'I will eat an apple' and ' I will be eating an apple'?

Without much context, these will be practically identical statements. However, there is a subtle difference when you look at the action for each case. I will eat an apple. This means that in the ...
ArbitraryRenaissance's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Relation between the events in future. Is it possible to connect present continuous and simple future

Yes, your sentence is grammatically correct and natural. Yes, you can use future simple and present continuous to make sentences of this kind. The usage of future simple puts the moment that you ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.6k
2 votes
Accepted

will + be + verb ing meaning

"Will be [verb]-ing is future continuous tense. It is used to describe a future, action that will occur over some period of time: All day tomorrow I will be studying for the big exam. As you know,...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.3k
2 votes
Accepted

I don't understand why in both cases future continuous is used

The reason that we use future progressive is explained in this article: The simple future is used ... In the negative form, to express unwillingness: The baby won't eat his soup. I won't leave ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.6k
2 votes

cannot be shared or cannot be share?

the report cannot be shared with them is the correct way. This is an example of the passive voice, which is made with to be + past participle. The past participle of share is shared, so if someone ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.8k
2 votes

You will be fine

It is the future tense (or perhaps more accurately a sentence that describes a future time with the modal verb "will"). You are fine. Is a simple present tense sentence (not continuous or passive),...
James K's user avatar
  • 218k
2 votes
Accepted

Are sometimes Simple Future and Future Progressive interchangeable

The general rule is that you use Future Continuous when the action takes a certain amount of time, and you will be in the middle of it at that time: At 5 o'clock, I'll be working on my project. (You'...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
2 votes

"Will you work this evening?" vs "Will you be working this evening?"

Will you work this evening? This could be a request. I want you to work this evening so I want to know if you are willing. It could also be a question about whether you will do even a little bit of ...
Readin's user avatar
  • 1,250
2 votes

What is the difference in the meaning between 'it will end soon" and "it will be ending soon"?

You are correct. There is no difference in meaning, but the second is more likely to be used of a situation with a predictable end time.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 54.7k
2 votes

The Central Bank will reduce the key rate for 2 years

Your question was about: The Central Bank will reduce the rate for a period of two years. It means it intends to reduce the rate and that will last for two years. It does not mean 2). For that you ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 44.7k
2 votes
Accepted

Future Simple vs Future Continuous

Sentence #1 says that the the factory will produce five million cars in the year 2035. It says nothing about years other than 2035. Maybe the factory will produce zero cars in 2034. Maybe it will ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.8k
1 vote
Accepted

How would you say that you will read a certain book in a certain month, but you won't finish it?

If you're purely asking about which verb tense you should use, then yes, I'd recommend future continuous. But (to me) a more natural way of saying this would be I will start reading a book next ...
krobelusmeetsyndra's user avatar
1 vote

Why do people prefer using "will be doing" form(future continuous) when they can use just "will do"(simple future)?

The simple future tense is used when an action is expected to occur in the future. The nature of it, however, is unknown. The future continuous tense is used to indicate that something will occur in ...
Sin Sopheak's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

to emphasize an possible affect, should I use future continuous tense or future tense?

As detailed here, future continuous is used to describe an ongoing activity that is expected to take place in the future. The usage in the lecture does not match this pattern; inserting the tuple is ...
laugh salutes Monica C's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Using the right tense for a future scheduled and planned action

Both are fine. "Is flying" is more colloquial, and would be appropriate in most contexts. "Flies" might be found in a formal report to management, or a schedule listing various things that are to ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.3k
1 vote

I will have been staying there for good after I passed the exam.(future perfect continuous)

If you want to say "after (some action in the future)", it should be after I pass We don't want to use the simple past, because we're not talking about something in the past. "After I (simple ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.8k
1 vote

"He IS / WILL BE running a marathon this Saturday" – difference in meaning

I think the difference between the two is simply that when you're using the present continuous tense, the emphasis is placed more on the fact that the event has been planned and is definitely going to ...
Michael Rybkin's user avatar

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