55 votes
Accepted

Next month, I _______ John for 20 years

D is certainly not idiomatic in British English, nor I think American. B is the only natural choice. It is possible that D is idiomatic in Bangla Deshi English: I don't know.
Colin Fine's user avatar
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31 votes

Next month, I _______ John for 20 years

Most verbs I can think of where “I will have been” doing something in the future perfect progressive are for actions that could be stopped and started over, resetting the clock, whether or not that ...
Davislor's user avatar
  • 8,464
9 votes

It will be or it will have been

There is little difference in meaning. There is a slight difference in perspective. Tomorrow it will be ten years since we were married. This sentence has a slightly forward-looking perspective, ...
Andrew's user avatar
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8 votes

Which sentence is most appropriate? "Next year Anny and I {will have been / will be} married for 25 years"

English does not have a future tense, but some forms involving will, shall, and be going to are labelled as such. See discussion of future forms here. I'll use that terminology here. Next year ...
fixer1234's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

"until it made him sick" vs. "until it makes him sick"

The future perfect simple is a funny tense, and since it is a future tense, I can see why you might expect to use the word will. However, it's not quite that simple. We use the perfective will have ...
Ben I.'s user avatar
  • 620
5 votes

"we will have picked you up in two hours”

There are four possible ways of completing this sentence, which tells me that the author did not think this through. OK, we'll be leaving you here and picking you up in two hours when we get back ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Future Perfect Progressive - In what case is it necessary?

Perfect tenses present the action with respect to a temporal vantage point. Present perfect presents it with respect to "now". Past perfect presents it with respect to a point in time in the past. ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 125k
4 votes

Which sentence is most appropriate? "Next year Anny and I {will have been / will be} married for 25 years"

The perfect Will have been changes the perspective to a present located in the future, from which present a past is to be viewed reaching back into time. Will be, on the other hand, talks about the ...
P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica's user avatar
4 votes

Next month, I _______ John for 20 years

The correct phrasing is B. In US English, the verb "know" is not used in a continuous or ongoing (or active) sense in regard to people. We do not speak of "knowing" a person. (&...
user8356's user avatar
  • 2,910
3 votes
Accepted

Using "BY", "UNTIL" and "TILL" with Future Perfect tense

I won't have finished X until|by... grammatical I won't have begun it until|by ... grammatical I will have finished X until... ungrammatical I will have begun it until ... ungrammatical You ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 125k
3 votes
Accepted

"would have been cause" or "would have been caused"

You are right: cause is a noun in this sentence, and been is the main verb in this clause. To use the verbal form of cause, you would have to say something like This would have caused doubt that ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

I will have offended every breathing entity

Within five seconds I will offend every breathing entity This means in five seconds you will start to offend, or be in the process of offending "every breathing entity." Something later in the story ...
LawrenceC's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Differentiate Perfect Tenses of Verbs

The "system" of names for English verb constructions is in many respects misleading (if not downright absurd), but no English verb construction bears such an inherently contradictory name as "Present ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
3 votes

Which sentence is most appropriate? "Next year Anny and I {will have been / will be} married for 25 years"

Next year Anny and I will have been married for 25 years. Next year Anny and I will be married for 25 years. The way I see it, the second sentence is wrong if speaking about a state that is on-going ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
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3 votes

Next month, I _______ John for 20 years

Which meaning of know? The more common use of 'to know' would mean that John is a person with whom I have been acquainted these past 20 years. In this case, (B), I will have known him, since the ...
Kirt's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Why is the use of future perfect incorrect in this scenario?

The 'process of arriving somewhere' doesn't really exist. You arrive somewhere at the end of the journey. It is usually a single very short event that occupies a moment, at a particular time (not ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

How to use "after" with verb?

In English, the second and third statements are correct. "I'm going" indicates a future event and the after indicates a sequencing. If you are talking from the time where the finishing and walking ...
eques's user avatar
  • 4,485
2 votes

Future pluperfect

It's brilliant! I think this is the best possible way to communicate the intended meaning. No words could be truer to the spirit of English grammar. How better to express the intended dishonesty of ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 27.6k
2 votes

Is this sentence correct? Present Perfect in the future

"I am going to close my claim after I have worked for this new company for at least one month" or "I was going to close my claim after I had worked for the new company for one month"
Big T Larrity's user avatar
2 votes

Should I write "expertise I will have gained" or "expertise I have gained"?

If you have not yet finished the course and so are talking about skills you will gain in the future once the course is completed, use "will." If you have already finished the course and so ...
JasonR's user avatar
  • 334
2 votes

How to say a interrogative sentence of future perfect tense?

Will you have finished your report by next Tuesday's meeting?
TimR's user avatar
  • 125k
2 votes

Future Perfect and Future Continuous with present reference

The second speaker's will does not signify futurity; it is an epistemic use, marking the clause as the speaker's confident inference of probability from knowledge of the subject and the circumstances. ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
2 votes

Future Perfect about Past

Yes. It's very unfortunate that we are stuck with the traditional classification of will do as a "future tense" (and will have done as "future perfect tense") Really, these are modal expressions, ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
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2 votes

"The chicken will have been cooking for an hour" - makes sense?

Yes. The verb "cook" can be used in this way. 1.1 no object (of food) be heated so that the state required for eating is reached. ‘while the rice is cooking, add the saffron to the stock’ https://...
Owain's user avatar
  • 1,490
2 votes

"The chicken will have been cooking for an hour" - makes sense?

2 : to undergo the action of being cooked // the rice is cooking now https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/cook "cook" is one of those verbs where the object and subject can be interchanged. ...
Acccumulation's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Rare usage of perfect tenses ("to have been" and "to have done") by Daniel Defoe

1) I think this part: "gave an account ... to be so predominant..." should be separated out, so the structure left is "... anyone would have thought the native propensity to rambling should be worn ...
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

By tomorrow, by 2050. Do such adverbs of time require perfect tenses?

Yes, all those sentences are grammatical. By tomorrow, he will have left Paris. When tomorrow comes, he will no longer be in Paris. It doesn't say exactly when he will leave. I will leave Paris by ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Which verb form is used when telling about an action that may be completed by some time in the future?

I might have changed my mind by then I may change my mind by then Both are valid, usage depends on the individual. Personally I would say 'might have changed' indicates that its slightly more likely ...
Tony's user avatar
  • 36
2 votes

The sentence "The rodents are believed to have been got(ten) rid of by the end of the month"? is supposed to be correct. Why?

The sentence is at best, very badly phrased. As Kate observes it might make sense is a context like The rat elimination program began on June 1st of last year. Twenty rats were caught in the first ...
James K's user avatar
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