69

The example is using figurative language to describe the scene. Don't come out would be the normal form to use in that situation if one is simply listing the events, but the song is trying to evoke the sense of a struggle, a fight between the character and the words. Don't is a more neutral term. It's a simple statement of fact - the words do not come. The ...


26

So what you seem to be having trouble with are tenses. The present simple tense can be used for things that happen regularly, sometimes, or never, but also for commands. Don't do that! I sometimes do it. I never do so. 1 is a command, whereas 2 and 3 are not. "Don't forget the bread" is a command, just like 1. Now, when the person listening to the command ...


22

As snailboat pointed out in a comment on your question, the premise of this question is mistaken. "What will you do tomorrow?" is grammatical, acceptable and idiomatic in certain circumstances. For example: Anna: Oh no! My running shoes are ruined! Now I won't be able to go for my usual evening run tomorrow. Joel: Oh dear! What will you do ...


17

"won't" is a short form of "will not", where the verb will is used to express an ability, capability or an expectation: Wood will float on water. Rock won't float on water. The car will start when you turn the ignition on. I turn the ignition but the car won't start. The lyrics you've cited express the the lack of the ability to speak, or an ...


16

BE + going to - Lindsay is going to fly to New York next week. Forms with BE + going to possibly originated in such utterances as: 1. We are going to meet Andrea at the cinema, uttered when we were literally going, i.e. on the way, to the meeting. At the moment of speaking there was present evidence of the future meeting. This use has become extended ...


15

Some explanations in this answer are going to be unorthodox, but all of them are in good faith. They are there to help you shatter your current understanding that gets in your way. (Also, keep in mind that I'm not trying to be technically precise here, but I'm more on the practical side of it.) Let's lay the groundwork. First, will is not the future tense....


15

There, won't means "refuse to". Similar contexts can be found among the results here.


14

Yes, that sentence is correct! The future in English is not only formed with will or other auxiliary verbs. There are people that argue that English does actually not have a future tense at all! Whether or not one agrees on that statement, there is definitely an obvious difference between English (and some Germanic sister languages like Dutch and German) ...


13

In non-formal conversation this is fine, except it needs more articles: a new life, because you are not starting new-life-in-general but a particular (albeit unspecified) new life, which presumably you are going to describe. the next week, because bare next week always means 'next' with respect to the time when you are speaking. It's barely acceptable in ...


13

I am going to the cinema tonight. This indeed shows that plans are already made (not necessarily that tickets are bought already, but the speaker is sure that he will end up watching a movie tonight). I will go to the cinema tonight. This is not "formal" as you mentioned, but for this scenario rather implies spontaneous decision (the speaker ...


13

As FumbleFingers mentions in his comment, this structure is fine and not uncommon. In English, we often modify the sentence to match a particular perspective, in this case the perspective of Elena, from the future, looking back over something I did in the past. This in comparison to: Elena will correct me if I miss something important. This perspective ...


12

Using the present tense for future events indicates certainty, consistency, and familiarity. In other words, use this to talk about events which will happen, which happen on a regular basis (or are predictable in some way), and about which you have some personal knowledge. The holidays start next week. I know this happens every year, last year I saw it ...


11

I don't think your concept is correct. The sentence is correct as written. There is no different "distance into the future" implied by the use of going to be versus will be. I can use either to talk about things that will happen in the next 2 minutes and the next billion years: I am going to finish this answer before I go to bed. The Milky Way and the ...


11

In English, it's customary to use the simple future, for making promises, especially promises made on the spur of the moment. Mother: Be careful driving the car 19-year-old son: I will, Mum. Father: Don't be late back home. 17-year-old daughter: I won't, Dad. The OP's short dialogue is similar A: "I have to go shopping this afternoon." “...


11

The imperative in English uses the same form as the bare infinitive: Play tennis! Be good! Don't watch TV. You can see in the last example that when forming an imperative with a negative verb, the helping verb "do not" is used. All these imperatives are likely to be talking about future activities. When you say "Play tennis!" the action hasn't ...


10

1 sounds better Generally if you say, "will have been," it means that state of being / activity has continued over the period of time mentioned. In this example, the marriage has lasted for 25 years, so you say you "will have been married." If a particular event (say, a special anniversary vacation) is coming up next year, you'd say, "Next year, Anny and I ...


9

I think it's often expressed with the word next, in place of the now, particularly when it's used to form an exasperated exclamation: Next you will tell me that Rome isn't even in Italy! I did a Google books search which revealed several contemporary examples. When I performed a similar search using "now" in place of "next", there were several results ...


8

The meeting will be in the future. Therefore, it is appropriate to use a form that indicates the future. (As pointed out by Barrie England in a note, English has no future tense.) Some possibilities are: During the meeting we will discuss XYZ. During the meeting we'll discuss XYZ. During the meeting we'll be discussing XYZ. During the meeting ...


8

Both can be correct, but I would expect that the first version is the one that you would actually want most of the time. In the first version, "I'll let you know when I have more information", there are two time points. At time T (now) you don't have more information. You are promising that at some time T+1, you will have more information, and at that ...


8

When we are sure about the event/things in the future, the present tense is okay. The holidays start next week - it's fixed that the holidays are coming next week. It's similar to the Valentine's Day is on February 14 and not will be on*. Some more examples - The train leaves in 5 minutes - the train is scheduled to depart at that time. The ...


8

Some of you will have met me before. [spoken in a speech to an audience] It will be the case that some of you have met me before. This is a curious usage of the future perfect but it is well established in standard English. For another example consider "You will have realized by now that ..." which means "It will be the case that you have realized by now ...


8

This answer is from a British perspective: I don't know whether the situation is similar in the US or other English speaking countries. It is necessary to consider the first question in two different contexts: You are in somebody's home and they offer you tea and cakes. Host: Will you be having cake? Guest: Yes, thank you. This is a polite offer, and ...


7

"When I will grow up, I will be a doctor." should be written as "When I grow up, I will be a doctor." to be idiomatic English. (See Using the future tense in a sentence containing a dependent clause starting with "when"​.) "Be going to" is used to show what somebody intends to do in the future, but that doesn't necessarily means between five ...


7

SHORT ANSWER: Only your first sentence is idiomatic English. LONG ANSWER: First, will is employed in when clauses only if when is employed as a relative adverb, not if when is employed as a subordinating conjunction:  You will arrive in Milan at 4 pm, when you will be met by our representative. ✲When you will arrive in Milan you will be met by our ...


7

Both of your examples are correct. Let me explain why. Both of your examples are in the simple future tense. There are two forms of the simple future tense: http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/simplefuture.html 1. to be going to + base form of a verb (or verb1) "I am going to be fine." This form is usually used to talk about future plans. "I am going ...


7

It is grammatically correct, but illogical. "Any time during the morning" means "between midnight and noon" but "until 4pm" means, well, "until 4pm." So to say "In the morning until 4pm" doesn't really make sense. Although most anyone will understand that you mean "In the morning or in the afternoon until 4pm." I would simply say: I am available any ...


7

It's a neologism. A survey of Google Books finds exactly one instance of the version with shall before 1980, and that's in 1962. Before then the verb is doth appear or will appear or 'll appear or simply appears. Versions with shall begin to flourish in the 1980s. Significantly, they all derive from popular fiction; in scholarly works the older forms are ...


7

A) The telephone is ringing. I'll go and answer it. "And" is often omitted by native speakers, so your impression was right there. B) I feel like going dancing tonight. Sounds nice and natural to me, since we refer to this activity as "dancing". I can see how you might be worried about having two "-ing" verbs adjacent, but it's honestly a perfect ...


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