22

"I'll be there in an hour" denotes arrival in one hour from the time the words are said. "An hour" is also generally used to be a bit vague, whereas "I'll be there in one hour" is generally used to be more specific. Either way, the clock starts from the time it's stated. "I'll be there one hour later" implies that it will be later than something, i.e. one ...


19

It sounds like they misunderstood you. "Please let me know when you send them to me" is perfectly fine for what you were trying to say, but if his English isn't very good or he doesn't think you can speak very good English he may just assume you meant to use the future tense. Here's an alternative: When you send them to me, please let me know. That's a ...


17

OP's is quite right. Clauses identifying a future time using when, after, before, as soon as, until, etc. use present tense. Only the main clause (saying what will happen then) uses future tense. Look at these examples from Ege Academy... When I finish writing the reports, I will go out with my friends. When the party is over, we’ll clean the house. ...


17

Either might be correct depending on when it does or does not matter, as @juhasz explains. "Doesn't matter" (does not matter) is present time. It does not matter now, at this present time. "Won't matter" (will not matter) is future time. It might (or might not) matter now, but it will not matter at the relevant time in the future. Example 1: "Paint the ...


16

Both are grammatically correct. Yes, you can use such words as tomorrow, this evening, later today, next month, five years from now in sentences that refer to future time. But there is no "future form" in English. The simple present tense form of to leave is leave/leaves (he leaves); the simple past tense form is left (he left); the simple future tense ...


15

No, this usage is not wrong. What it means is that, at some time in the past, you had an appointment planned for an interview tomorrow. Up until you heard that it had been postponed, you would have been able to say: I have an interview tomorrow... After hearing that the interview has been cancelled, you no longer have a meeting tomorrow, so you move it ...


14

Yes, this is strange, and I think you're probably correct in diagnosing it as a translation flub. It's the kind of use I often hear from non-native speakers.


14

Let's take this one step at a time. He will do it This uses future simple to describe a future action. If you want to set a deadline for the action, you can express it in two ways: He will do it by Friday He will have done it by Friday Both of these say that the action will be carried out by Friday (the one at the end of the current week, so it's ...


13

I am going to the cinema tonight. This indeed shows that plans are already made (not necessarily that tickets are bought already, but the speaker is sure that he will end up watching a movie tonight). I will go to the cinema tonight. This is not "formal" as you mentioned, but for this scenario rather implies spontaneous decision (the speaker decided ...


12

Everyone would know what you meant if you said "you can pay when the order gets ready," but it is a less accurate way of saying what you want to say. Using "gets" implies action. Actually, it implies that the order is taking action itself. It is making itself ready on its own. Obviously, that is not true. Someone is making or preparing the order. A better ...


10

Using the present tense for future events indicates certainty, consistency, and familiarity. In other words, use this to talk about events which will happen, which happen on a regular basis (or are predictable in some way), and about which you have some personal knowledge. The holidays start next week. I know this happens every year, last year I saw it ...


9

Please let me know when you have shipped them is unambiguous but requires the shipper to understand " when you have shipped them". "Please notify me when they have been shipped" is unambiguous but requires the shipper to understand "when they have been shipped". Please send a postal tracking number if available, or a shipping notice with ETA uses nouns ...


9

I doubt you will manage to tie this down. Even among regular English natives, there is the constant need to clarify after any such statement, leading to such convolutions as… "This Monday - the 4th" "Next Monday - not this one, the one after" "This coming Monday" "A week Monday" "This Monday - the one we just had - two days ago" [...


8

When we are sure about the event/things in the future, the present tense is okay. The holidays start next week - it's fixed that the holidays are coming next week. It's similar to the Valentine's Day is on February 14 and not will be on*. Some more examples - The train leaves in 5 minutes - the train is scheduled to depart at that time. The ...


8

I agree with Tetsujin; native English speakers differ. I've heard native speakers use both meanings in each of the examples you give. I most often hear "this Monday" and "next Monday" to both mean "the Monday of the following week". And of course contextual cues can be used to determine if the speaker is intending "this Monday" to be in the past. "This ...


8

There is little difference in meaning. There is a slight difference in perspective. Tomorrow it will be ten years since we were married. This sentence has a slightly forward-looking perspective, as if I'm thinking about the future with my wife. Tomorrow it will have been ten years since we were married. Again, similar meaning, but the use of the ...


8

The use of "doesn't" and "won't" follow the same rules in this context as in most other contexts: Doesn't refers to the present tense and sometimes to an ongoing state. "He doesn't want to go out." - In this moment, he has no desire to go out. "He doesn't sing." - As of now, and until further notice, he is not singing and will not be singing. "...


7

Unfortunately, yes, your question for the seller was ambiguous, even though it was grammatically correct. It could have been interpreted several ways. Most probably you meant something like this: At the time you ship my items, please notify me. This makes most sense from a strictly grammatical standpoint. Reversing the two parts of the sentence without ...


7

We would normally say "when the order is ready" to express that particular future eventuality. We normally use get ready to express a person's preparedness for an activity, and it is important to note that it is a present action, something undertaken now, that prepares for the future necessity.


6

This is why the linguists insist that English has two tenses: past and non-past! These uses of what we ordinarily call “present” tense, simple or progressive, with future reference (instead of the explicitly futurive will) tend to be restricted to definite plans. They say in effect “This is what is on my schedule”. Q: Sherry, is Bob free sometime ...


6

It depends on how the writer wants you to perceive the web page. If they want you to think of it as a completed document, which you are coming along and reading now that it's done, then the present is appropriate. "My explanation already exists. You haven't gotten to it yet, but it's there." If they want you to think of it as them talking to you, then ...


6

A: "Excuse me. Do you close at 8 o'clock this evening?" B: "No. I'm afraid we close at six." QUESTION: Isn't it (#A) supposed to be the present continuous since 'this evening' is mentioned? ANSWER: No, both can be used as the #A's question, since the time adjunct "this evening" is not a factor here: A: "Excuse me. Do you close at 8 o'clock ...


6

I actually think that the misunderstanding may be from his reply, rather than your request. When the seller says, "I don't know when will send to you", he could just be the "messenger" who verifies payment and puts all sales in a queue. Somebody else will take that queue and get the items ready for shipping, and somebody else will actually ship them. He ...


6

A far more casual response could be, "I'm thinking of catching a movie (film, flic, or flick) tonight." I am Canadian and as such, I do tend to borrow from the French, hence, flic/flick for film.


6

You could simply say: I have plans to go to the movies tonight. Plans are plans, not cast in stone, and are implicitly subject to change. You nailed the answer in your question.


6

We use the present continuous for things that are going to happen in the future, but which we have already arranged with other people. The question "Why do we use the present continuous for future plans" is a very good question. Well, one reason is that English only has two tenses. It has a past tense and a non-past (present) tense. We need to use some ...


6

The present simple tense is used a great deal in vernacular English. You may not have used it much since it is your instructor's job to teach you all the other tenses that you will use only rarely in everyday English. If you google the present simple tense, you will find plenty of tutorials explaining the usage, some better and some worse than others. This ...


6

What is involved here is the lexical aspect† of the verb meet. Meet in this sense has a specific sort of time structure 'built in' to its meaning. It's what we call an "achievement" verb: it designates a point in time at which a goal—a change of state—occurs. There may be a more or less extended period during which you are working toward ...


6

The future perfect simple is a funny tense, and since it is a future tense, I can see why you might expect to use the word will. However, it's not quite that simple. We use the perfective will have when we are looking back from a point in time when something will have already happened. Therefore, what follows is in the past tense. By the time he gets ...


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