31 votes
Accepted

Is it incorrect to say I'm 20 years old next month?

You certainly can use the present tense (I am, he is, we are, etc) about a scheduled event, and many people do so when discussing a forthcoming birthday. I am sixty tomorrow, I am fifty in March, I am ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
18 votes

Is it incorrect to say I'm 20 years old next month?

Want to add to the accepted answer: using the present tense to speak about future events is common, but to my intuitive understanding as a native US speaker is incorrect... except that it's understood ...
neph's user avatar
  • 360
17 votes

"It doesn't matter" or "it won't matter"?

Either might be correct depending on when it does or does not matter, as @juhasz explains. "Doesn't matter" (does not matter) is present time. It does not matter now, at this present time. "Won't ...
Edward Barnard's user avatar
16 votes

"he leaves for New York tomorrow". vs. "he will leave for New York tomorrow"

Both are grammatically correct. Yes, you can use such words as tomorrow, this evening, later today, next month, five years from now in sentences that refer to future time. But there is no "future ...
Alan Carmack's user avatar
15 votes

"Had" for future time

No, this usage is not wrong. What it means is that, at some time in the past, you had an appointment planned for an interview tomorrow. Up until you heard that it had been postponed, you would have ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.4k
15 votes
Accepted

Talking about the future using "Could have"

Let's take this one step at a time. He will do it This uses future simple to describe a future action. If you want to set a deadline for the action, you can express it in two ways: He will do ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.4k
14 votes

How to say that you have plans to go to the movies tonight?

I am going to the cinema tonight. This indeed shows that plans are already made (not necessarily that tickets are bought already, but the speaker is sure that he will end up watching a movie tonight)....
Vilmar's user avatar
  • 1,314
12 votes
Accepted

Can we say “you can pay when the order gets ready”?

Everyone would know what you meant if you said "you can pay when the order gets ready," but it is a less accurate way of saying what you want to say. Using "gets" implies action. Actually, it implies ...
MarielS's user avatar
  • 706
11 votes

Why is the present simple tense used for an event that is in the future?

Using the present tense for future events indicates certainty, consistency, and familiarity. In other words, use this to talk about events which will happen, which happen on a regular basis (or are ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.2k
9 votes

It will be or it will have been

There is little difference in meaning. There is a slight difference in perspective. Tomorrow it will be ten years since we were married. This sentence has a slightly forward-looking perspective, ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.2k
8 votes

'We are having a party this evening' - Why do we use the present continuous?

We use the present continuous for things that are going to happen in the future, but which we have already arranged with other people. The question "Why do we use the present continuous for future ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
8 votes

"It doesn't matter" or "it won't matter"?

The use of "doesn't" and "won't" follow the same rules in this context as in most other contexts: Doesn't refers to the present tense and sometimes to an ongoing state. "He doesn't want to go out."...
Jesse's user avatar
  • 1,656
7 votes

Can we say “you can pay when the order gets ready”?

We would normally say "when the order is ready" to express that particular future eventuality. We normally use get ready to express a person's preparedness for an activity, and it is important to ...
Robusto's user avatar
  • 14.4k
6 votes

How to say that you have plans to go to the movies tonight?

A far more casual response could be, "I'm thinking of catching a movie (film, flic, or flick) tonight." I am Canadian and as such, I do tend to borrow from the French, hence, flic/flick for film.
H. Patullo 's user avatar
6 votes

How to say that you have plans to go to the movies tonight?

You could simply say: I have plans to go to the movies tonight. Plans are plans, not cast in stone, and are implicitly subject to change. You nailed the answer in your question.
dotancohen's user avatar
6 votes

Simple present for speaking about the future the way natives do

The present simple tense is used a great deal in vernacular English. You may not have used it much since it is your instructor's job to teach you all the other tenses that you will use only rarely in ...
Mick's user avatar
  • 6,526
6 votes

Does "to" refer to a future event

What is involved here is the lexical aspect† of the verb meet. Meet in this sense has a specific sort of time structure 'built in' to its meaning. It's what we call an "achievement" verb: it ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

"until it made him sick" vs. "until it makes him sick"

The future perfect simple is a funny tense, and since it is a future tense, I can see why you might expect to use the word will. However, it's not quite that simple. We use the perfective will have ...
Ben I.'s user avatar
  • 620
5 votes

"Will come" or "Will be coming"

Future continuous isn't necessarily about continuous activity, and does not imply that the activity will take place at the same time as anything else. It can be used in several ways: to project ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.4k
5 votes
Accepted

"to be" or "would be"?

He thought the resemblance to be only qualitative. The structure object +infinitive +complement is formal You can change the sentence like this with the same meaning(colloquial) He thought that ...
V.V.'s user avatar
  • 7,085
5 votes
Accepted

Is it grammatical to use a present tense in an event that is not happening yet?

Present tense is fine for expressing a thing that is always true, even when the frame-of-reference is the future. I'm visiting Jan next week. It is always good to see her. But "it will always be ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 122k
5 votes

What tense is used in "Tomorrow I die"?

That is the "simple present tense", which (although it is called a present tense) can also be used for future events, especially when the speaker believes that they are absolutely certain and ...
James K's user avatar
  • 213k
4 votes
Accepted

What is difference between 'going to' and 'about to' in the given sentences?

I am going to buy a house. Meaning: I will buy a house in the future. This could mean later today, tomorrow, a week from now, a year from now, etc. It conveys the fact that plans are in place, but ...
eelero's user avatar
  • 878
4 votes
Accepted

You should make your bed after you wake up / after you woke up / after you have woken up? Which one to choose?

In sentence 1, both verbs, make and wake, are in the present tense, but in English the tense (i.e., the verb form) doesn't always refer to the obvious part of the timeline. Here you might reasonably ...
deadrat's user avatar
  • 1,598
4 votes
Accepted

Will this happen or is it a condition?

It means number 1, because as of the date of the headline (August 31, 2016) two miracles had already been attributed to her intercession. The second miracle was credited in December 2015, and she ...
Alan Carmack's user avatar
4 votes

Simple present for speaking about the future the way natives do

In an attempt to answer your bountied question: I don't know if this sentence structure is unique to American English over British English, but as a native AmE speaker, it sounds natural to me. For ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.2k
4 votes
Accepted

Simple present for speaking about the future the way natives do

Addressing your specific questions: 'Can you imagine how dirty it gets over time?' When people talk informally, they are often a little sloppy. The present tense would be the perfect choice to ...
aparente001's user avatar
  • 1,732
4 votes
Accepted

'The boy told us that he is sitting for an examination next Monday.' - Is the present continuous tense "is sitting" suitable to use in this case?

The question is about the best choice. The best choice is (c) i.e. is sitting. You can use the present continuous for something you have planned or decided to do in the future. As for the use of ...
Khan's user avatar
  • 27.1k
4 votes

Does this sentence need "will"?

This is what is technically known as the futurate, the use of the grammatical present tense to describe events in the future. You will also see: I'm going to school tomorrow The holidays start ...
SamBC's user avatar
  • 22.8k
3 votes

How to say that something happens in the future related to a particular date?

To specify a particular date the prepostion "on" is usually used Failure to receive payment will result in fines on or after the 20th of the month. Your assignments are due on August 30th. "On"...
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.2k

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