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23 votes
Accepted

Can I use "me" as the subject of the sentence?

In Sentence 1, the subject is Attending X (not me), and the verb is gave (not attending). Your first sentence is an example of a sentence with a gerund phrase as a subject. Wikipedia gives these ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
14 votes

Does this mean "Jerry was being taken aback by a stranger”

When we use the verb "recall" like that, it takes a gerund (usually ending with "-ing"). So, I looked scared ⟶ I recall looking scared I thought hard ⟶ I recall thinking hard I ...
Toby Speight's user avatar
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11 votes
Accepted

Does this mean "Jerry was being taken aback by a stranger”

It means, assuming that Jerry's recollection is correct, that Jerry was taken aback by a stranger. It would be odd to use a continuous "was being", and it doesn't match the quote.
James K's user avatar
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8 votes
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"no + gerund" or "not + gerund"

Consider the following: There was no scaling that steep cliff. Going around the mountain was the sane choice, not scaling that steep cliff. The first means that the cliff was impossible to ...
TimR's user avatar
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6 votes
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What tense is this? 'Despite their already having paid the money...'

despite is a preposition meaning not prevented by. A preposition normally attaches a noun to a sentence, for example: He completed the marathon, despite his age. already having paid the money is a ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 60k
5 votes

Can I use "me" as the subject of the sentence?

The title is misleading since "me" is not the subject in your first example. Attending X gave me a sense of appreciation for Y. By attending X, I acquired an appreciation for Y. In [1] ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
5 votes

"no + gerund" or "not + gerund"

In modern English grammar, verb + ing is catogarized into three classes: Gerundial Noun Gerund-Participle Participle Adjective So whether no or not will come immediately before a verb + ing will ...
Man_From_India's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Is "doing" in "I'm the first woman doing it" a gerund or A participle?

Modern grammars don't distinguish between gerunds and participles, and nor should you. So you can say this is a gerund-participle. Traditional grammars distinguish between -ing verbs which are in a ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
4 votes

Gerund as a noun 'having/taking a shower'

No. Your underlying sentence I wake up and then I have a shower consists of two independent clauses. You may delete the repeated subject, but the second clause requires a finite verb. Note also that ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
3 votes
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Importance and usage of being in relative clause

Being is essential here. This is not a relative clause but a 'gerund' clause--that is to say, a clause acting as a 'noun' and headed by a verb in the -ing form. The clause "larger ... number" must act ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

"decision being made" What piece of grammar is it?

Both of them are examples of the passive voice, the present continuous tense, and a reduced relative clause. The passive voice is created by using to be and the past participle of the verb. The verb ...
stangdon's user avatar
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2 votes
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"Using troughs in this way to identify particular bonds is covered on a separate page" - or "The use of.."?

As TRomano said earlier, the first sentence is colloquial; it works only in informal or spoken English. As such, it is sort of out of place in a chemistry book, but the author may have been trying to ...
ostrichofevil's user avatar
2 votes
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Why did the author use "remembering" instead of "remember" in "principles that I think are key to remembering"

to in this case is simply taken as a preposition. In light of this use, you can replace what is next (together with the gerund) with a noun. Now I'm starting with three basic principles that I ...
Schwale's user avatar
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2 votes
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What is "new people" in this sentence?

As StoneyB mentioned in his comment, "new people" is the direct object of the gerund "meeting." People would be the object, and new would be an adjective that describes the type of people being met. ...
mathewb's user avatar
  • 1,143
2 votes

What tense is this? 'Despite their already having paid the money...'

Despite their already having paid the money, there was an additional tax. -ing words are not verbs, but either participles (if modifiers) or gerunds (if nouns). To wrap your head around the form of ...
LawrenceC's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

“His swimming is brilliant”

His swimming is brilliant. Although the word swimming is a gerund, it's best to call its grammatical use here a noun or gerund noun. That makes everything easier. Just like you can say: "My car is ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.5k
2 votes
Accepted

Verb + [adverb clause] + - ing

I could give you a straightforward answer, but I'm guessing you - and anyone else who finds this question later - would prefer to really understand the answer. So, this is going to take a bit of ...
SamBC's user avatar
  • 22.8k
2 votes
Accepted

Is the auxiliary verb "have" declared implicitly in this sentence?

The sentence is ungrammatical, it should be After having accused the Congress of working in favour of Pakistan, it appears to have resurrected the issue of "citizenship".
jonathanjo's user avatar
  • 7,553
2 votes

"ING" after comma

"Beginning" in this example is not a gerund, but a participle. This sentence is an example of how a participle phrase (in this case, how two participle phrases connected with "and")...
RussoTuristo's user avatar
2 votes
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Is 'watching him' a gerund clause in this example?

He saw James watching him. Yes, it's a catenative construction. "See" is a catenative verb and "watching him" is a subordinate gerund-participial clause functioning as its ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
2 votes

Is this Gerund Phrases correct?

Her (constantly) cleaning the house every day is not necessary. The expression "her cleaning the house every day" is a non-finite clause with a personal pronoun as subject. Non-finite ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
2 votes
Accepted

so + V-ing -- correct grammatical structure?

In this formation "so" is a conjunction meaning "thus" or "consequently". "So distributing" is not itself a phrase. "so + V-ing" can be a phrase where ...
timchessish's user avatar
  • 2,014
2 votes
Accepted

Where should I put “not” in the sentence 'The person admits to ___ having ___ read the book'?

To help assess the naturalness of the negated gerund, I've replaced "The person admits" with something more natural: The interviewer admitted to not having read the book. The interviewer ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
1 vote

what is the right way to use having in a participle clause? Is "I went out having eaten lunch" okay?

I believe that 'having eaten lunch' is, here, a descriptive gerund phrase. As such, it can appear in either position, though some people might find it easier to read with an added comma, especially if ...
SamBC's user avatar
  • 22.8k
1 vote

"to set a man framing titillating hypotheses". What does it mean?

It's an interesting one to pull apart, this. Several relatively obscure words. We can see that set is a verb, here. One clue is that it has to in front of it. So, she "wants to set...", but what? Set ...
SamBC's user avatar
  • 22.8k
1 vote
Accepted

gerund participle and relative

You can call it an "adjectival" usage if you like. But it's usually called a relative clause. In the example context it can only be the friend who does the picking out, not the teenager. But ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote

By +ing vs. Ing

A) Yes, and I'll explain it in B). B) It seems to me that using by in these phrases you wrote only emphasize the way you'll be doing the thing. For example: Why are we wasting our time speaking in ...
krobelusmeetsyndra's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Think of going out and enjoying / enjoy the wind

There are two verbs here, going and enjoying, that are each gerunds and starting their own gerund phrases. They are joined by and, and each should be able to stand without the other. Exclude each in ...
SamBC's user avatar
  • 22.8k
1 vote

“Gathering evidence” vs. “Evidence-gathering”

The biggest difference is that on is a gerund (gathering evidence) and the other is a noun (evidence-gathering). If you were making a list and wanted the language to be parallel, one list of ...
Tyler V's user avatar
  • 536
1 vote

police entering ... is illegal

The possessive is not really used in such constructions by most speakers. Many books on style and usage insist on it, however: His entering the house in the wee hours of the morning gave them a ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 128k

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