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39 votes
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Is "Being a heavy stick the dog has held it tightly by the middle" grammatically correct?

You are referring to a "dangling modifier" (a species of "misplaced modifier") and yes, many writers, teachers, and grammar books tell us it is an error. But it is not a ...
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38 votes
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Why does this sentence use "to writing" instead of "to write"?

Both those sentences are grammatically correct, but they have very different meanings, and Hemingway's version is the correct one for the intended meaning. This portion of the quote can have two ...
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  • 14k
24 votes
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Why is building called building even though it's already built?

It is historically connected with gerunds, but not usefully in the current language. Every verb can form a gerund meaning the action or process of ..., but only in some verbs has that meaning been ...
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  • 64.1k
17 votes

Why does this sentence use "to writing" instead of "to write"?

I don't like the Merriam-Webster explanation that is given by another answer, because it is completely opaque even to me (a native speaker). All you need to know is that the phrase in question means: ...
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  • 1,253
8 votes

Is "Being a heavy stick the dog has held it tightly by the middle" grammatically correct?

Being a lumbered sentence, it's missing a comma. Apart from that, it's awkward, but valid.
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7 votes

Why is building called building even though it's already built?

The answer is -ing had a different role in Old English (where it was sometimes -ung). It was still used to turn verbs into nouns, but they were a different kind of noun that often referred to the ...
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5 votes

Why does this sentence use "to writing" instead of "to write"?

"Writing" is a gerund, and it functions as the object of the preposition "to". Merriam-Webster gives the following definition of "to" (as used here): used as a function ...
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4 votes
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How to use "Having + V3" and "Having been + V3" at the beginning of sentences

These participle phrases can be added to a sentence to explain the reason for the main part of the sentence. I'd prefer the first example to be something like: Having seen my mother work tirelessly, ...
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  • 149k
4 votes

'Writing': is it a gerund (noun) or present participle (adjective) in this sentence?

A writing table is a table for the purpose of writing on, not a table that is in the act of writing. Writing here is a gerund used as an adjective. https://medium.com/@engtuto1/can-gerunds-be-also-...
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4 votes

Why does this sentence use "to writing" instead of "to write"?

There are some implied words left out. There's a lot of mechanical work to (the action of) writing. Your way would be this. There's a lot of mechanical work to (the action of) write. And that's ...
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  • 796
4 votes

for teaching French

Those sentences are grammatically correct but are unlikely to be used by English speakers. The object of "for" can be some kind of misdeed. (For example: "She received a ticket for ...
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4 votes

paid him to repair

Yes you are correct. When you use a past tense and present participle, it signals it has already been done. Another example: I thanked him for his advice. (Meaning he already gave you advice)
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  • 5,679
3 votes

The verb "arrange" followed by an infinitive or gerund

You may use a gerund after "arrange." That usage is appropriate when the gerund is describing a generic activity. Dolly arranges the flowers at the church. Dolly arranges the cooking for ...
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  • 27.3k
3 votes

Should I use gerund only in the sentence like "I postpone meeting"?

The meeting might be in the future, but the act of "postponement" can be in the past. So it is correct to say: Yesterday I postponed our meeting until the end of the month. Or I have ...
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  • 149k
3 votes
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I had seen Arizona desert landscape before I reached California. Past Perfect vs Past Simple. Past Simple vs Gerund

There is no need to use the past perfect, because the actions are presented in chronological order. However, "Arizona desert landscape" requires a determiner: I saw the Arizona desert ...
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3 votes
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looking like Vs that look like

Whilst the intent of both sentences is the same, the first is ambiguous. Whilst few would read it as such, it could mean that she lived in an ordinary house and she looked like a castle. Ridiculous I ...
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3 votes

How to use a gerund+infinitive structure like "trying to win"

The verb "try" can take an infintive complement. It is a member of a class of verbs that can be followed by infinitives: want to play... / like to run / try to win ... etc. The verb &...
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  • 149k
3 votes

In the sentence "What are the benefits of earning money?" what part of speech is the word "earning"?

As another answer notes, "earning" is a gerund. If you look up its headword form ("earn") in a dictionary, the part of speech is verb. In your sentence, it functions as the object ...
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2 votes

What is the difference in meaning between "an order" and "an ordering"?

The noun "ordering" doesn't work well here. It means "a particular arrangement in sequence" (a quite different meaning from that of "place an order") The participle/...
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  • 149k
2 votes
Accepted

Some grammar questions from the test

how is that correct to use gerund after "to"? It is a correct use of to because the preposition is indicating the second part of a TO PREFER this TO that construction. It is a construction ...
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2 votes
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Gerunds, infinitives or imperatives

"Cumplir promesas" There is no single translation that will work in all cases. I won't cover all cases here: I will concentrate on how to specify definitions but mention a few related ...
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  • 22.4k
2 votes
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gerund form .vs of noun phrase

The meanings are the same. A writing style that liberally uses participles as nouns / adjectives / adverbs is excellent in my opinion. I'd also recommend never using predict adjectives and predict ...
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  • 124
2 votes

'Being about' meaning in the given context

Your last two sentences are ungrammatical; it should be "I don't want to be talked about/laughed at". Yes, talk and laugh are intransitive, but the phrasal verbs talk about and laugh at are ...
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2 votes

Using "Much" with a gerund

Examples: Walking is very good for you. Running is also good for you. Believe it or not, working is also good for you. OK, so, if you want to discuss "how much" of all this is good for you,...
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  • 35.4k
2 votes

it is good for you

For me (Australian English native), a and d are perfectly idiomatic. b is ok, but sounds more natural around the other way ("Talking to him bothers me"). Whereas c sounds pretty dubious, and ...
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2 votes

Is this Gerund Phrases correct?

Her (constantly) cleaning the house every day is not necessary. The expression "her cleaning the house every day" is a non-finite clause with a personal pronoun as subject. Non-finite ...
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  • 13.1k
2 votes

Why is building called building even though it's already built?

Gerunds in English are like nouns in that they don't have different tenses like the verbs from which they are derived. I appreciate this is different in other languages such as Japanese, where there ...
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  • 73.2k
2 votes

"Winds" or "wound" the string before tying a knot

The answer key is not correct. The sentence (as you pointed out) does not contain any clues that would constrain it to only present tense or only past tense. Therefore either "winds" or &...
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  • 20.6k
2 votes
Accepted

"After computer breaking down we could not restore the lost data"

Your sentence has two problems: The singular common count noun "computer" requires a determiner. "After" is a preposition whose object is "computer". That implies that ...
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