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-1

I'm just an English student but I think it means the country in question could lose her European rights as a result of the European commission's warning.


1

At least in American English, only the -ing version is natural in this particular expression. What do you mean by after a noun? Mary loves cake has an inflected verb, not an infinitive, after a noun.


-1

The sentence can be rephrased to use "to be stripped": The warning from the European commission could lead that country to be stripped of its European rights.


1

I believe both are correct. Perhaps your book provides more context enabling us to choose between the two options. "A" is reporting an event. "B" describes experiencing the event. "A" is past tense - "something happened." "B" is more continuous - it's describing the event as it was happening at the time.


-1

Well "by making" and "to make" sound different in different sentences. So they sound the same but you use them in different sentences depending on how they would sound in the sentence.


1

Quite means "to a considerable extent or degree." This is quite interesting. Much can also mean "to a great extent or degree," and far can mean "much," but you can't always just replace one word with another. We do not use "much" or "far" before adjectives in their positive forms (interesting, quick...) but only before their comparative forms (more ...


2

"Decide" does not take a gerund as its direct object. It can take a "to infinitive". The first example you give is simple error in the quoted source. The original has "decided on going into the garden". Unlike "decide", the phrasal verb "decide on" can be followed by a gerund. The second may be an error (of the author, publisher or printer). It could be ...


1

The form: The only way to X is to ensure that Y and Z are stopped. (To X is an infinitive verb phrase that serves as the subject of the sentence.) is perfectly proper and quite natural. One cannot substitute "being stopped" or "to be stopped" without significantly recasting the sentence. One could write: To X we must ensure that Y and Z are ...


0

Consider the sentences below: There is no point in breaking the seal. They were entertaining the troops. In the sentences above, traditional grammar call breaking a Gerund and entertaining a Present Participle. Consider the Gerund - breaking. The verb lexeme is break, and the form of Gerund is breaking. Consider the Present Participle - ...


0

First, note that by using "I have planned" (or the contraction "I've"), you are emphasizing that you have done the work of planning at some previous time. You may want to simply use "I planned". If you are only expressing what your current intent is, you would say "I plan to travel", or equally, "I plan on travelling". (substituting "on travelling" works ...


2

1) The best way to destroy your enemy is to make him a friend. 2) The best way to destroy your enemy is by making him a friend. The first sentence sets up a relationship between the first and second part. The best way to do something = make x something. The "to" is a function word that allows the two parts to relate to each other. It connects the two ...


-1

Understanding why English speakers choose to use to verb or verbing in a sentence is... complicated. And is something which many linguists disagree on. Infinitive vs. gerund The to verb form, often called the infinitive, in your first example is the way most English speakers would say this. But as pointed out by FumbleFingers in comments, the verbing form, ...


0

These are different constructs that happen to mean the same thing in this example. Learning English is a gerund clause, where learning is a verb and English is its object. It functions as a noun phrase, like a subordinate clause. English learning is a noun+noun phrase, where English is a noun modifer. This doesn't specify the relationship between the two ...


1

Words ending in -ing can be gerunds - a verb used as if it were a noun. Gerunds take adverbs and can have a complement (object). present participles or nouns formed from verbs (verbal nouns). Nouns take adjectives and cannot have a complement (object). Learning English - learning is a verb, English is a noun English Learning - English is an adjective, ...


3

I believe you are correct. The gerund in the first sentence you posted is the object of the preposition "than". That prepositional phrase can be removed and the sentence would still be correct: Asking questions is easier. You can do the exact same thing to the second sentence: He prefers playing football. A gerund used as a complement is usually ...


0

Either a or b work grammatically, but b is the most idiomatic and seems correct: My father never approved her marrying a foreigner. "Her marrying" is the action of her getting married. It is this that the father did not approve of. Although "My father never approved her to marry a foreigner" makes grammatical sense, it sounds like the father had to give ...


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