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5

The first example is incorrect. A compound adjective is formed by two (or more) words that jointly describe a noun. Such adjectives are usually hyphenated so as to indicate that they form a single unit. The use of a hyphen also aids clarity and removes any ambiguity for the reader. A better example of this is shown in the following sentences: I saw ...


5

Neither of those are correct. It would actually be phrased: Are ECN470 and FIN470 the same course? I.e. You need to use "are" for the plurality of the two course names, and then the singular "course". It may seem counter-intuitive, but let's expand out the essential meaning to see what is singular and what is plural: Are ECN470 and FIN470 two ...


3

A "sale" is a noun in this context, meaning the event of selling something - in this specific context it refers in a general way to the money made from the sale, i.e. "Sales" means "the total amount of money made from all of the sales". Sales will double. ("double" is a verb) This refers to the process of that amount doubling, more transactions/sales, ...


3

Firstly, it is certainly the case that the present perfect (simple or continuous aspect) is normally used when there's 'for + a period of time' - but only if that period of time extends up to the present. For example: My sister has gone to New York for a week. (she is still there) I've been playing golf for 25 years and I'm still no good. But the ...


2

This is acceptable, but quite old-fashioned; nobody would talk this way in ordinary parlance unless they were deliberately trying to come across as poetic or dramatic (there may be a subtle sense of mocking something when speaking this way). If this style were used in writing, it would generally be in a creative work, or for dramatic effect in some other ...


2

The phrase is not a question so doesn't have question order. Compare a question: What is this? with the request Tell me what this is. The phrase "what this is" isn't a question clause. It is a noun phrase. In your example the question Why did you apply for this job? is compared to the request Tell me why you applied for this job.


2

Yes, it can be countable or uncountable. When uncountable, you would not use the possessive "have", as in your example. This is because, while the countable refers to one of the potentially many relationships you may have, the uncountable refers to a state or the concept of friendship. "Countable" Examples: I have a friendship with John. I have many ...


2

It's verbs that have subjects. The subject of your first verb, love, is I, and the object is the gerund phrase "watching movie." Within the gerund phrase, watching is the verb, and its object is movie. Everything else is a triple of prepositional phrases, each of which functions adverbially, as each modifies watching. As for Netflix, it's the object of the ...


2

Following on from FumbleFingers' comment, the pizza is hers. To say that it was her would indicate that she had been turned into a pizza rather than being the person to whom it belonged. PS. I recently, with the approval of the Portuguese snack-bar owner concerned, scratched out the apostrophe in the sign on the toilet door reading: Customer's only - ...


2

No. The first dialog could go: What position are you in, alphabetically? I'm second, alphabetically. And the second: What position are you in line? I'm second in line. And note that in the second question, the in is part of the prepositional phrase "in line." So technically, the question is not grammatical because it means, "In what ...


2

The responses should be I'm second (in the gradebook). I'm second in line. Because your name is in the gradebook. Your name is not in a number. So "I'm second in number" is not correct. In practice the phrase "in the gradebook" would be omitted, because it is clear from the context. So the questions must be: What position are you in the ...


1

Formally, "has finished," "had finished," and "have gotten." Colloquially, you'd be likely to hear "is finished," "was finished," and "get."


1

There are two negations: I would rather not have shown him my love -- this negates the preference I would rather have not shown him my love -- this negates the showing In practice they mean pretty much the same thing.


1

No, your current construction is incorrect. It should be: I saw a gray and a black elephant. That is, I saw a gray elephant and a black elephant. The extra indefinite article "a" before "black" shows that you are talking about two individual things. Without the "a" before "black", it would be as though you are talking about seeing an elephant ...


1

Yes - if you use a whole word as a prefix it is normally hyphenated (unless a recognised compound word exists). Vertically-carved characters. You could, of course, omit the hyphen by saying instead: The characters are carved vertically.


1

It depends on what you want to say, if you look for the ways then you're looking for all of them, whereas if you're looking for ways you're looking for some ways but not necessarily all of them.


1

If you would like to stick as closely to your proposed slogan as possible, I would suggest altering it slightly to Makes a difference This links nicely to your second bullet point in that it is clear that wearing it will have a positive effect on the consumer. Your current phrasing is more like a command to someone else that they should make 'it' ...


1

Classically, the past tense has been used for indirect speech (e.g. He told me that I was honest), but that is changing. If the condition / quality / etc. expressed is known to be or likely to be still true, the present tense if often used nowadays (e.g. He told me that I am honest). Therefore, depending on the context and on the age of the text, the ...


1

It's essentially two sentences - "try this" is an order/request/command, and "it should" is a comment about the thing you're asking them to try. So you would say something like: Next time try something in a script file - that should be more precise. Something in a script file should be more precise - try that next time. To put this into a single ...


1

Shielding can be applied either to what is protected from some influence or to the source of that influence (if not to both). Example 1 is about protecting A (by shielding it) from something else. Example 2 is about isolating A (by shielding it as a source of an undesirable influence) from everything else (which is thus protected).


1

“The shielding of A” most commonly means protecting A from something (that is, your option 2). For example, “The shielding of your barbecue from the weather with a fabric cover, roofing, etc. will prolong its useful life.” However, you have also identified how constructions like, “the shielding of weather from your barbecue” are possible. As a learner, I ...


1

None of those expressions is idiomatic English. I want someone doesn't do something would have to be "I don't want someone to do something" If you were requesting another person to pass on the message, you could say "I ask you to ask him not to do it."


1

Both are grammatical and acceptable. In short, the present perfect (have found) is more likely to be used when the speaker has no end time boundary in mind related to the context in which the past event (originally finding it) remains operative, carries consequences, or is of importance. The present simple (find) is more likely to be used when the speaker ...


1

You are correct on both counts. It should not make the slightest difference on which hand it is worn. This phenomenon is called extraposition. Here is what the non-extraposed version of this sentence would look like: On which hand it is worn should not make the slightest difference. The clause in bold is too heavy (that is, long) to sound natural in ...


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