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Who/what/how/when/where/why questions "What country you are from?" is not a complete question-sentence. It refers to the answer of the question. You can put it in other sentences, including question-sentences: "I don't know what country you are from." "Please tell me what country you are from." "Does he know what country ...


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Use "said" here. "Told" sounds very awkward. It is usually used with an indirect object: "As I told you before..." or with certain other forms like "He told of his adventure" (old fashioned). "Said" needs a preposition to take another object: "As I said to you before..."


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When talking about an amount of money, a singular verb is required, but when referring to the dollars themselves, a plural verb is required. Five dollars is a lot of money. Dollars are often used instead of rubles in Russia. Subject verb agreement


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The use of "gonna" is informal speech meaning "going to", so that makes no difference to the meaning. "I'm going to move out" is a simple declaration of intention. It could be followed by a time qualifier: "tomorrow". "I'm going to be moving out." is a little vaguer, and speaks of a process rather than an ...


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It is neither. I find it useful to think of English verbs as falling into three classes. The vast majority of English verbs have only a lexical role and no grammatical role. For example, "see" has meaning all by itself, but it is not conjoined with other verbs to alter the tense or voice of another verb. Let's call a verb that can play only a ...


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Perhaps you have seen a stick insect sitting on a stick, or a leaf-shaped katydid hanging from a branch—but probably you have not, so well do they blend in. It's called subject-auxilary inversion. Here, the inversion is triggered by the preposing of the complement "so well". The basic order would be "... they blend in so well", where ...


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Oh absolutely. In particular, it has the sense of doing something repeatedly in order to improve knowledge. Using flash cards, for example. You use flash cards to strengthen (i.e., to reinforce) knowledge that you've already learned.


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It is perfectly correct and natural to use Reinforce in this way. That use of reinforce would be very commonly heard in a learning environment (in a classroom or with a teacher, for example). Small unrelated correction, though: The article the should instead be a possessive pronoun since you're talking about a specific person's knowledge, not an abstract ...


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"As I said before" is correct, because you are emphasizing or restating that you have already said something, and there is no need to place a noun after "said." "As I told before" is not quite correct, because it raises the question "who have you told before?" "Told" must be followed with an object (noun), ...


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Normal usage: If a person does something nice for you, you have to say thank you. [in general, a simple present is used] If a person did something nice for you [specific act at a specific moment in the past], you have to say thank you. [a specific act in the past even if the date or time is not given] If a person has done something nice for you [in the ...


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In each of these sentences, "got" is simply an informal way of communicating. "I got bored while watching serials" could be said like this: "I became bored while watching serials." "I was bored while watching serials" is grammatically correct, but it does not mean the same thing as "I got bored while watching ...


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It's grammatically correct. "Being" is a participle, which functions as an adjective, and "to be" can be applied to adjectives. But I have never heard it before in my life. I've heard things like "Don't be messing with my camera,"—which is colloquial and dialectal, but again, 100% grammatical—but doubling up on the word "be&...


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The question asks is "the colour (of her hair)" the same as "her hair colour" Normally these would be equivalent. Sometimes, in context, "hair colour" might mean the same as "hair dye", so it would be possible, in context, for "What is her hair colour" to mean "What brand of hair dye does she have?"...


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Functionally, it's an adverbial phrase modfiying the main-clause predicate "wreaked havoc on the global jobs market" and introduces the consequence of the action.


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How will we handle one-on-one instruction while social distancing? This sentence uses "social distance" as a verb, which is a neologism, a new usage. It is awkward, and probably best avoided. A more usual construction would be "while distancing socially". The phrases "social distance" and "social distancing" appear in ...


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Rather than "independent clause" I'd describe these as two coordinated clauses: you have a good time with her everything is going according to your plans They are equal to each other and joined with the coordinating conjuction "and". A comma is correct, but I'd consider it optional, as both expressions are subordinate to the "I ...


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The OED, s.v, for (prep., conj.), sense 19, says a. In the character of, in the light of, as equivalent to; esp. to introduce the complement after verbs of incomplete predication, e.g. to have, hold, etc. (see those verbs), where as or as being may generally be substituted. ... b. So with an adjective, as in to take for granted, to leave for dead, etc. for ...


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Let us look at some options if the people went on holiday for a week, the whole place would be reclaimed by the jungle by the time they returned This refers to a possible future event. They have not, as far as the speaker knows, been on holiday but if they did then the jungle would come back during the space of the week they were away if the people had ...


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I think either one is correct, at least in the US. The former is more common, and therefore sounds more natural. Oddly enough, some different forms sound more natural the other way: "A thousand dollars was spent", but "Hundreds of dollars were spent" both sound natural to me.


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