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46

Has by is not a single expression; rather, it's the end of one and the start of another. She tries not to react but knows she has by the smirk on Frank’s face is in two parts: She tries not to react but knows she has by the smirk on Frank’s face We might expand the sentence to make this easier to understand: She tries not to react but knows she has ...


5

It is not really unusual or uncommon in English. It is simply inserting a clause with the reason into the sentence. That is, it would be reasonable to write She tries not to react but knows she has, the threat in the not-so-veiled statement plain. Inserting "by the smirk on Frank's face" just provides the reason she knows. It could equally ...


4

"The Bible" is the name of a book. Hence, "Read The Bible" (note the capitalisation of "The") is an instruction to read a copy, any copy of "The Bible". Note you can also say "Read a bible" and it would mean a very similar thing, but the assumption could be that one would be just using it to consult it on a ...


3

"If I were you" is a common idiom. It puts you in somebody else's place, hypothetically. "If I had been you" is not an idiom. If you think about it, it doesn't really make sense. Even though "if I were you" is purely hypothetical (you can never really be someone else) it is at least based on a common premise, how you would ...


3

The word business has several different meanings. One is "commercial or mercantile activity engaged in as a means of livelihood". So Microsoft is a business, Air India and Aeroflot are businesses, and so forth. In this meaning, business is countable, and we have to use an article or counter with it. Another meaning of business is "an ...


3

The Cambridge dictionary offers several meanings for should. One of them is "use after that to show an opinion or feeling". Here is an example: It's odd that she should think I would want to see her again Looking at your sentence... ... he was still wretched– wretched that she should have thought it such a perfect afternoon for Obstacle Golf ... ...


2

It looks like you have an idea of the difference here, but it is hard to tell with some of the grammatical errors. "Even if [condition], [clause]" means that--regardless of whether or not the condition is true--the clause will still be true/happen. It is often used with hypothetical conditions. "Even if" implies that the condition is not ...


2

It is grammatically correct: it is an example of verb phrase ellipsis. The omitted text appears in brackets below: A: Who could have done this? B: Whoever did [do this], we'll find them. To me, though, it strikes the wrong note to have do as the main verb in the question, and to have do then appear as an auxiliary verb in the answer. I think that it would ...


2

You can use the first formulation, although it does sound rather colloquial. English does permit the use of the present tense when describing future events but these are almost always preceded by a contextualisation that the event in question will occur some time in the future. So to adapt your first formulation: For my subsequent article, I first explain ...


2

She exercises every day. would be a common way to describe her routine. Last time I (had) checked (on her), she still exercised every day. would also be a correct sentence describing her routine in the past.


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It's more about usage than grammatical correctness. We would say I went to Australia when I was a student. ...but we could also say Yes, I have been to Australia. It was when I was a student. The present perfect indicates that you have had that experience at some time in the past, rather than mentioning a particular occasion. See https://www.englishpage....


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An adverb is used to modify a verb, whereas an adjective is used to modify a noun. This is one of those situations in English, where native speakers often do not follow correct grammar rules. "He did greatly." is technically correct, but it is not idiomatic. Instead, one would say "He did well" (well is the adverbial form of "good&...


2

“Her best season as a hitter” is the subject “ the less difficult of the two problems” is the subject “ the slowest of those workers” is the subject Reason : In grammar, a subject is a word, phrase, or clause that performs the action of or acts upon the verb. In addition to nouns and pronouns, noun clauses also perform the grammatical function of subject. ...


1

We generally use it to refer to a noun that was used in an earlier sentence: The heart is the central organ in our bodies. It is used to pump oxygen around the body through the bloodstream. (It refers back to The heart) We generally use this to refer back to whole clauses and sentences: More and more people are discovering that Tai Chi is one of the most ...


1

“At the age of” is singular and “At the ages of” is plural You would use the first in referring to just one year, and the second when referring to multiple. For example: At the ages of thirty and thirty one I learnt Spanish. So you might say something like: At the ages of 2 and 4, my kids were quite a handful. And then even if it was more than one kid, ...


1

Yes, the "it" is necessary. "I can't remember which tutorial it was." is a complex sentence. It has a main clause "I can't remember" and a subordinate clause "which tutorial it was". If we delete "it" here, then the subordinary clause is not complete.


1

The reason for the definite article before "batter" is that it has been mentioned, and it is now a definite thing that you are to mix. The reason for omission of the definite article before "butter" is that it hasn't been mentioned yet, and so it isn't definite. If the article had just mentioned, for example, 1/2 stick of butter, maybe in ...


1

The to-infinitive is a verb. It's also a handy way to refer to that verb as a lexical item. The monosyllable "be" may not make it clear what one means.


1

It's common for speakers to use 1. The sound difference is not great. If you're writing to represent such speech, you could write it that way. If you're writing more formally, you'd better use the form he'd.


1

Yes, it is grammatically possible and indeed common. The continuous identifies actions that occur throughout a relevant period of time. The first sentence is identifying a relevant period of time very explicitly with “when; it implies that there actually were, are, or very likely will be such times. The second is conditional; it does not imply that such ...


1

A khaki shorts zipper is a zipper that is meant to be used as part of khaki shorts. Like “i bought a khaki shorts zipper because the old one was broken”. The khaki shorts’ zipper is the zipper that is part of the khaki shorts.


1

In this case, it would have to be "He unzipped his khaki shorts' zipper," as the shorts are being possessed by him, and the shorts are possessing the zipper. The idiomatic way of saying this is just "He unzipped his khaki shorts." "Khaki shorts zipper," would just mean a shorts zipper that is khaki.


1

A more formal or unambiguous form would be "...but she knows she has done so by ...". In answer to questions like "have you done this" or "have you been there", some people will answer simply "yes I have" and others will answer "yes I have done" or "yes I have been". The preference may be regional; ...


1

Yes, if it were “, which are...” Sort of. It is the verb of the predicate, but “gaining” is also a verb acting as an adjective (a participle).


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The construction is in place of so that, yes. You can do this in your own writing but it very often is perceived as more formal than the alternative.


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It is either deserve or should, so far as I understand your original statement. So only complex commands deserve command helper functions or So only complex commands should use command helper functions In this case, however, you must use the second example because deserve implies the complex commands have agency. Inanimate objects in English do not ...


1

'This' is correct but I would not use 'confer' in this instance. In the example cited here, confer is used in the much stronger sense of reaching a decision and would be used alongside 'with' ordinarily if not always. Your passage might read better as the following: When someone runs out of ideas and reaches an impasse, they should converse / meet/ speak ...


1

English requires an article for every noun (except in colloquial speech, where there may be variances). Thus, your choices must be limited to the indefinite or definite article. Some may point you to this answer but this deals with colloquialisms and is not standard English. The answer here is much better in that regard. Proper nouns should not take an ...


1

The sentence in the OP's question “Whoever did, we'll find them" is grammatically acceptable. Most native speakers will use the auxiliary "do" to avoid repeating a verb phrase which has already been mentioned, this is especially handy when the verb phrase is long. (A) Who has done the washing, the ironing, the cooking and the tidying up? (B) ...


1

"Even if" is a way to express a definiteness of an outcome. It is a way to say: "In the scenario in which these things happen, they will still have no impact on the outcome" . "Even if" can be used to refute an argument. "If he were a saint, he would marry me!" - "No, he would not marry you, even if he were a ...


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