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6 votes

Using neither alone in a sentence

The word neither is used in a few different ways. Usually it's used before nouns like a determiner, for example "You must eat or drink neither fast food nor soda." Note that not doesn't ...
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3 votes

Is it correct to say "If you changed your mind"?

All your sentences are wrong, it should be: If you change your mind tomorrow, call me. If it is open tomorrow, buy another one for me. If it is closed next week, forget it forever. I will see you ...
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3 votes

Using neither alone in a sentence

You could say, with at least a comma in the middle, You must not drink sodas. Neither must you eat fast food. Or, in one unbroken but slightly old-fashioned sentence: "You must neither drink ...
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2 votes

"translator of" or "Translator for"

In cases like this, "of" is usually used for situations where there can be only one such position in the company, for example the CEO or President of the company. For any other position, you ...
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  • 339
2 votes

"Since" vs "that"

First, It had been several years since I travelled that road and It had been several years that I travelled that road are both grammatically proper and idiomatic, but they have different meanings. ...
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2 votes
Accepted

Word + yet + word

Whenever you use "word1 + yet + word2," the second word is usually a contradiction to the first word in some way. What you are saying is that even though it's word1, it still has some ...
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  • 339
2 votes

Meaning of "make" in "Can you make me a copy of this?"

"Me", in your example, is the indirect object. Indirect objects are quite common in formal and in colloquial English. For example, Hand *me* the book. I gave *her* the money. Would you ...
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2 votes

Why the article is omitted in this context?

Names of meal(time)s don't usually take an article unless the meal is a special occasion - A dinner was held in honour of Professor Smith. For a routine meal - Have you had breakfast? Let's go for a ...
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2 votes

Is the phrase " Life is so beautiful not to be happy with it" grammatically correct?

No, it doesn't make sense. It sounds like you're trying to make an argument that one should be happy with life, rather than unhappy, and your using the weight of evidence as the reason. You should ...
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2 votes

How do I say that I'm studying to become a Primary School teacher?

It is much better to say "a Bachelor's degree in Primary Education". "Primary Education" is all right but the lower case version is used more often.
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  • 496
2 votes

What is the difference between the prepositions 'up' and 'onto', both indicating 'motion'?

Up shows direction of motion. You can go up the hill from anywhere on it, even from the very bottom. Onto shows motion to a place that is on top of something. The motion itself does not need to be ...
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2 votes

What is the difference between the prepositions ‘upon‘ & ‘onto‘?

"The cat jumped upon the table" introduces a potential ambiguity. It could be understood as "The cat did jumps which started and finished on the table." Now pragmatically that is ...
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1 vote

"Since" vs "that"

The explanations you read sound correct. In each of your examples, the "span of time" is "several years," so you should use since. For the sentences to be correct, however, the ...
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  • 1,398
1 vote

"Since" vs "that"

It was several years since/that I had been travelling that road." Since and that are not organically connected. The have no intrinsic connection. Past tense, past meaning: It was several years ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Just like/just as + complete statement

Technically, because there is a verb after like/as (go in), you should use the conjunction as: You have no reason to come out your apartment, just as I have no reason to go in. Like is typically ...
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  • 1,398
1 vote

Is "thought" or "had been thinking" more common?

You can just look at this Ngram viewer here, which shows which is more commonly used. As you can see in the link, "thought" is a lot more commonly used than "had been thinking".
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1 vote

At/on/in name of a road/street/avenue

This is one of those difficult questions where it depends on which variety of English. As far as I know, nowhere do people say at with a Street. But the choice of in or on is not straightforward. I ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Meaning of "make" in "Can you make me a copy of this?"

Can you make me a copy of this? Can you make a copy of this for me? Both forms are fine and are similar. These two sentences have the respective constructions: a. modal verb + S + V + NP Dative + ...
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1 vote

Can I use the word "in" after "behind"?

This sentence makes no sense, and is grammatically wrong! It should be just There is no rationality behind the allegation made by him.
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1 vote

"This book is Mita's" vs "This book is of Mita's"

This book is Mita’s. is grammatical and idiomatic. This book is of Mita is so unidiomatic that I strongly believe it to be ungrammatical. I do not want to be dogmatic because it is certainly ...
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1 vote
Accepted

"This book is Mita's" vs "This book is of Mita's"

When you introduce someone, it's quite common to say something like "This is Jerry, he's a friend of the family" In the same way we can talk about possession using "of" Your pen's ...
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  • 22.1k
1 vote

Why the article is omitted in this context?

We don't normally use articles before the names of routine daily meals - I will have eggs for breakfast. Mother cooked chicken for dinner. Will there be ham and salad for tea? I like a cup of tea and ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Sounds nice/fine is the same as saying sounds good/great?

Good and great are much stronger adjectives than nice and fine, but all four are OK to use. However, you should be aware that sometimes, nice and fine are used when the person really means the ...
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  • 1,398
1 vote
Accepted

Do I need to use future perfect tense for expectation?

The adverb "already" is not needed. The meaning of "already" is given by the present perfect. So you can say: By May 15th / By the 15th of May/ we expect everyone to have ...
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1 vote

What is wrong with "I admired the patience she spoke with"?

All of your comments are correct. In practice, we try not to end a sentence with a preposition, although there is increasing tolerance to that, especially in spoken English. The last example you show ...
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  • 1,398
1 vote

A question about the subordinate clause of a sentence

The pronoun "that" heads the nominal phrase "that of “run philosophy”, a coded way of talking about emigration". The entire phrase functions as an appositive, referring to "a ...
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1 vote

Why in this sentence is not has instead of have?

He might not have been informed about his uncle's death. The subject may be 3rd person "he", but the verb "have" is the plain (infinitive) form, not the 1st person "have"...
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1 vote

What is the difference between up and upon?

I wonder where you found that definition. It's misleading, I think. As Lexico says, The preposition upon has the same core meaning as the preposition on. However, in modern English upon tends to be ...
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1 vote
Accepted

What is the difference between up and upon?

I don't find We went upon the hill particularly idiomatic. Upon usually describes a position rather than movement. It's far more natural to say We went up the hill but you can say We stood upon the ...
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