11 votes

Can I use this response to this question?

No. It is not acceptable. The pronoun "They" is missing a reference. The answer tells us that "They" are "two dogs". For that to make sense then the person must not ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
9 votes
Accepted

She got her bag caught vs. She had her bag caught

In American English there's a subtle difference: Subway Policeman: Why do you have this woman's purse and why is she lying unconscious on the floor of the subway car? Male Passenger: She had her bag ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
6 votes

She got her bag caught vs. She had her bag caught

I would certainly use get [something] caught to describe an accidental occurrence; as Stuart says, have it caught sounds as though she deliberately caused it to become trapped. However, I think have ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 54.8k
6 votes

Should I revise the sentence in bold?

You could say ... if any country were to challenge it, that country would lose all of its naval force. ... if any country challenged it, that country would lose all of its naval force. ... if any ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
5 votes
Accepted

Noun phrase with adjective

"Since being tall" is not correct. You need to use "becoming tall". The meaning of "becoming tall" is "change from short to tall" and you mean "from the ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
3 votes
Accepted

Clearing present simple and present perfect with since

To lift an explanation directly from Oxford dictionary, 'since' means "in the intervening period between the time mentioned and the time under consideration, typically the present". So there ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 101k
3 votes

Can I use this response to this question?

I would say "There are two dogs". If the "there" was missing in the question then "they" might work.
Rohit Gupta's user avatar
3 votes

Are both sentences below correct?

You can say: Where do you see yourself five years from now? or Where do you see yourself in five years? In five years from now seems to be used pretty commonly as well, but it's a little redundant ...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
2 votes

She got her bag caught vs. She had her bag caught

For the most part, the two forms mean the same thing, especially in the context given. And they are both a bit ambiguous, too: they could imply that the subject intended for her bag to become stuck, ...
John Bollinger's user avatar
2 votes

replaces "which"?

Edit The antecedent of the relative pronoun which is the noun phrase more than one clause, and hence the sentence means Complex sentences are sentences which have more than one clause; at least one ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

Why would the author write "The cat was curled up" instead of "The cat had curled up"?

the sentence The cat curled up implies that the observer had seen the cat curling up, the action of curling up. He did not he only saw that the cat was curled up after the cat, by it's own volition ...
Elliot's user avatar
  • 240

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