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5

[1] Andrew decided [to buy a sundae instead of a double-scoop cone]. [2] Peter and Elaine could not decide [if they wanted to elope or have a big wedding]. [3] The beach is a lot of fun, [yet the mountains are better]. [4] I am going to the park because [I like nature] You've cited a mixed bag of examples, each containing a subordinate (dependent) clause, ...


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A writing table is a table for the purpose of writing on, not a table that is in the act of writing. Writing here is a gerund used as an adjective. https://medium.com/@engtuto1/can-gerunds-be-also-used-as-adjectives-89e5698411f3


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Yes, it is a valid English sentence, though the suggested versions are more natural ways of expressing the idea that zoos don't normally keep domestic animals such as cows. We would use a sentence like that to say that there is a lack of something that we need and should have supplies of. I need to make sandwiches, but there isn't a loaf of bread in the ...


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In this context, I would use simple past tense verbs: We met in 1990. We were close friends until he died.


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I agree with everybody above. Thank you, guys! I would also add that "had done" refers to something that happened prior to "No one knew..." and had some consequences, while "did" coincides with the moment of speaking. Progressive form - "was doing" would show the action in its progress while "did" simply ...


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Grammargeddon! looked at different style manuals and usage guides and they do not forbid split infinitives: I’ve looked up “split infinitive” in The Chicago Manual of Style (Chicago, the style guide I use) and on the website for AP, and then I checked Buzzfeed for good measure. After that, I went to the usage guides: Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary of English ...


2

[One in three U.S. adults] has/ have prediabetes. The head of the bracketed NP is the plural "adults", so the simple agreement rule would suggest that the plural verb "have" is correct. However, the verb can be singular as well as plural, the optional singular override clearly being motivated by the presence of "one", and the ...


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I agree completely with Kate Bunting's comment and mostly with FF's. Both sentences are grammatically correct, but they have different meanings: The simple predicates of both clauses are in the same tense, so the reader will probably infer that both actions ("knew" and "did") occurred at the same time. For example, perhaps you were ...


2

"Why not" is an idiom used for making a suggestion, if it wasn't an idiom it would hardly be grammatical. It isn't a question. If you say "Why not go shopping", you are not expecting an answer. "Why don't you" can also be used for making a suggestion, but this is also a regular question form. "Why don't you go shopping.&...


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The general rule is this: Every clause must contain either one predicate or multiple predicates connected in series; every predicate must contain either one simple predicate (SP) or multiple SPs connected in series. Let's look at your example sentences and all of the verbs. (Important note: I am using fairly traditional definitions of "clause" and &...


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He seems to know French very well: he is said to have spent his youth in Paris Present perfect is used in this sentence not because it's about youth, but because it's reported speech (somebody told you that he had spent his youth in Paris), so the tense is backshifted. If you remove is said, it is no longer reported speech, so you don't need to backshift: ...


1

This is my writing table. I bought a writing table. "Writing" is best classified as a verb phrase functioning as an attributive modifier. It's clearly not a noun, and it fails the usual tests for adjectivehood. For example, it can't be modified by "very". And it can't occur as complement to complex-intransitive verbs like "become&...


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Context determines whether "could not" is replaceable with "can not". The modal verb could is preferred to formulate more formal and polite requests, the meaning in both versions is the same. Could I have a glass of water? Can I have a glass of water? In English when we talk about ABILITY in the PRESENT, we use can, can not, or cannot. ...


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'Whether ... if' is sloppy. Most native speakers would understand what you meant, but a careful speaker might prefer to ask: "I was wondering whether it's okay to bring this bag?" We know you want to bring the bag 'with you'.


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The present continuous can be used to express an annoying habit. So the person doesn't approve of Jane waking up late, because she often forgets to set her alarm clock. He finds this annoying, hence the use of the present continuous.


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Some verbs can take two objects. Some verbs can't (you need to learn which ones can take two objects - you can't work it out). Verbs that can take two objects include "give" and "write". The rule is simple enough. You can either use two objects and write Give <recipient> <thing> or use a prepositional phrase headed by &...


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a) is not grammatical in most varieties of English : without introduces a noun phrase or an ing clause, not a finite clause. (There are some dialects which allow it, I think, but no standard varieties). b) is grammatical, but unusual: we usually don't express the subject of a subordinate clause when it's the same as the (actual or implied) subject of the ...


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You can say either Why don't you go? or Why do you not go?. But you cannot say *Why do not you go?


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Your hypothesis is incorrect. The referent of a relative clause can be unique (and thus take a nonrestrictive modifier) even if it begins with an indefinite article. That is a possible interpretation of your example #1: The doctor is presumably only trying one new testing method, so it does not need to be restricted further. (By the way, it is also possible ...


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