Skip to main content
12 votes

When talking about a broken device, would there be any difference between: "I will get it working." and "I will get it to work."

"Get it working", using the continuous tense, better suggests that you will restore something to working order so that it will go on working, perhaps autonomously. We use 'working' to ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 103k
8 votes
Accepted

"Robert had suggested he invite her to his graduation . . ."

Adding would or should changes the meaning. That said, this pattern is used with these verbs. The bare or base form of the verb is used. Pattern: verb of suggestion + that + subject + base verb ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.4k
6 votes

Is 'nowadays' a negator? / does it form a sentence whose polarity is negative?

To test whether "nowadays" is a negator, we can see whether the combo of "nowadays" and a negative polarity item (NPI) is grammatical. One example of an NPI is "at all". ...
Rosie F's user avatar
  • 526
5 votes

Is 'nowadays' a negator? / does it form a sentence whose polarity is negative?

I would say nowadays introduces contrast, not negation. Cambridge explains: We can use nowadays, these days or today as adverbs meaning ‘at the present time, in comparison with the past’: I don’t ...
fev's user avatar
  • 9,545
4 votes

Is it necessary to change this sentence?

We didn’t go farther because we would be killed if we got into their territory. We didn’t go farther because we would have been killed if we had got into their territory. Version 1 works in general. ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
4 votes

They have gotten the vaccine

Yes, "they have gotten the vaccine" is fine in American English. It's not especially formal, so an official report might prefer "they have received a does of the vaccine" or more ...
Juhasz's user avatar
  • 9,869
4 votes
Accepted

difference in nuance and frequency of usage between "Who'd have known?" and "Who knew?"

"Who knew?" is a "set phrase" - sometimes expressing genuine surprise, but usually an ironic response to some banal observation (similar to "No shit, Sherlock!"). "...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
4 votes

How about 'participating something in '?

I think there are two ways of interpreting the second sentence. Audience members participating in the music-making process can enhance the level of engagement and enjoyment for everyone involved. In ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Can we use has been raining as has stopped

It can indicate that the rain has stopped, but that isn't the main point. The main point is that "there was rain" and it contrasts with "there was no rain". The rain might start ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
4 votes

What is the metaphorical meaning of "lights out"?

Lights out is technical jargon in this paragraph. You probably won't find the meaning in a standard dictionary. In IT management, lights out refers to the ability to manage a system remotely, without ...
stangdon's user avatar
  • 40.9k
3 votes
Accepted

"The teacher came to class and advised the students." Is this sentence simple or compound. Argument for simple is it contains singular subject

The teacher [[came to class] and [advised the students]]. is a simple sentence with compound predicate. A compound predicate occurs in a sentence when multiple verbs apply to the same subject. For ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
3 votes

Doing something vs Going to do something

You have chosen a bad example. "Going to do" is one way of talking about future events. It is often used when we think of the present as leading to the events in the future, as in "...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
3 votes
Accepted

"Laundry mesh bags" or "mesh laundry bags"

As you see, both versions are in use, but I much prefer mesh laundry bag, and that way round is way more common. I think FumbleFingers mentions the order of adjectives, in which material comes before ...
Omar and Lorraine's user avatar
3 votes

Is “whom?” A full sentence?

There is a joke on how to use "who" and "whom". If the word is preceded by "for" and followed by "the bell tolls" use "whom". Otherwise use "who&...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
2 votes
Accepted

Can we usually use the word still in a negative sentence?

Positive and negative are irrelevant to the usage of the word still. As used in the OP, "still" has a general meaning of "up to the present moment", and can be used to qualify ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
2 votes

What does"hope was all" represent?

The comment above answers this correctly. One could rephrase the sentence as "We could offer only hope..." or "We could offer nothing more than hope". The sense is that we have no ...
Jim Davis's user avatar
  • 121
2 votes

What is the correct reported speech for - She said to me, "When are we going to leave?"

She said to me, "When are we going to leave?" A) She asked me when they were going to leave. B) She asked me when we were going to leave. Edit Collins Dictionary third section, sense (1) ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
2 votes

Is 'nowadays' a negator? / does it form a sentence whose polarity is negative?

No. Nowadays is a partitive sentence adverb. It is used to give a time-frame to an action or state. It is used to describe both negative and positive actions and states. The inclusion of "...
user81561's user avatar
  • 2,579
2 votes

Tense choice| Grammar

The first one sounds odd to me with its combination of simple past and present perfect. That’s not to say that the two can never be used together: Her letter arrived yesterday, and I have answered it ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

The warm sand but hot water

There is nothing incorrect about "I lay on warm sand" or "I drank the warm water". The word "the" has its usual meaning, of marking the sand or water as "determined&...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
2 votes
Accepted

Difference between 'Do' and 'Should' when used in a question

'Should' is used in a question to ask the correct or best thing to do. 'Do' is commonly used in place of this modal verb. In your examples, there isn't any real difference in meaning. The difference ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 103k
2 votes
Accepted

Is there the phrase "have an experience + to do something" correct? Is the phrase "learn about something. from ..." correct?

We learn about things from books. That is, preposition from casts "books" as a source of information. Preposition with would cast them as tools or implements. But your rationale (referring ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
2 votes

"In which bar shall we go?" vs. "Which bar shall we go to?"

In American English, if you are asking about choosing a bar where you can have a few drinks at a casual get-together: Which bar should we go to? "go to" is used with destinations. If you ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
2 votes

which given its age?

Although the dog has a grade IV/VI pansystolic left apical murmur, which, given its age, breed, [considering the dog's age and breed] and progression, [progression has to refer to the disease, not ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.3k
2 votes

How about 'participating something in '?

[1] [Participating audience members in the music-making process] can enhance the level of engagement and enjoyment for everyone involved. [2] [Audience members participating in the music-making ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
2 votes
Accepted

Is "London" is used as emphatic expression?

London is a) a place b) the place Yes, he will literally take it to London to have it framed, but there is an implication that framing in London will be of a higher quality than in a provincial town ...
Dale M's user avatar
  • 883
2 votes

What are the grammatical rules for identifying parts of a sentence joined by conjunctions?

A key is represented in a partial-key tree by// a pointer to the data record containing the key value for the key// and a partial key. There are two parts to the sentence. A key is represented in a ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.4k
2 votes

What are the grammatical rules for identifying parts of a sentence joined by conjunctions?

This example is difficult because it's about a highly technical topic. What if we use the same syntax, but substitute less technical items: A car is represented in a dealership's inventory by a ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 13.5k
2 votes
Accepted

Is "No. You won't." used as double entendre?

"Double entendre" means that something has two meanings. Usually this means one innocent meaning and one meaning that is sexually suggestive. For example, there's a classic line, "If I ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.4k
2 votes
Accepted

Is it better to replace 'which' with 'where'?

Which and where in relative clauses: I have simplified the Original Poster's example in (1) below: a point with respect to which [another point is related] In the relative clause above, the word &...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible