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The most correct and most formal way would be These days, technical writing is a promising field in which you can find a good job. In less formal contexts, this would also be acceptable These days, technical writing is a promising field which you can find a good job in.


1

To weaken can mean either to become weaker (as in this context) or to make weaker (something or somebody else). So in sentence 1 the sense is 'the concept has become weaker (= has weakened by now, as a result)' which is OK, while changing to passive voice (has been weakened), would mean that 'some unnamed forces have made that concept weaker (=it has been ...


2

I think that would be correct (certainly in modern usage), but in my mind it doesn't sound brilliant, especially for more formal writing. BUT as pointed out in comments, this meaning is not very common and should probably be avoided. Alternatives: 'or in other words' 'that is, ...' 'i.e.' (however that wouldn't quite sound right in the context of your ...


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It's not a kind of proofreading briefing. I'd recommend you to consult the text, Finnish Passive House Entrepreneurs' Motivators to Start Sustainable Enterprises.


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You should recognise this and not being a true "question", but a "suggestion" (phrased as a question). The speaker is not asking if something is true or false, but offering an idea and asking for your comment. All are grammatically correct. But B is a non-sequitur. It doesn't respond to the suggestion. C is an answer to a question, but we aren't being ...


2

You are correct, and the sentence is not. As you said, it should be: Users can send alerts to ...


0

The difference is that A is notionally looking backward from the time after leaving, whereas B is looking forward from now. In this case I can't see any practical consequence of this difference.


1

My best guess in the context would be that “it” might be referring to an injury or cramp. The speaker or writer doesn’t know the cause but has noticed that the person isn’t able to run at full speed, but is improving. To “run it off” can be used when talking about running through a muscle cramp until it passes or a similar pain/minor injury. It is hard to ...


0

While it is possible to say "I cannot not eat..." You should avoid this construction if possible. In this case you could say "I cannot fast for 5 days" or "I cannot go without food for five days". Other words don't have convenient ways of expressing the negative "not eat" with positive verb "fast". However it is usually possible to say "I cannot stop ...


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To me, seem actually has a different meaning when used as a linking verb and a concatenative verb. As a concatenative verb (eg seems to have been), it is evaluation of an objective state of affairs. My bank account seems to have been activated means "as far as I can tell, my bank account has been activated". As a linking verb (eg seems activated) it is a ...


1

I think you are talking about double letters such as 'tt' or 'll'. As with most things in English, there are some patterns which can help, but there are no universal rules. For example: in the combination 'VCV (stressed vowel - single consonsant - vowel) the first vowel tends to be "long" (actually, tense, or a diphthong). Examples: bated /bɛɪtɪd/ '...


0

No - I don't believe there is an equivalent rule in English that dictates the spelling of the word based on the pronunciation. There is the plural rule, that if a singular word ends in 'y', the plural ends in 'ies' (for example baby, babies). I suppose that is a case of the spelling being dictated by the pronunciation, but in English generally - and I would ...


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It would be more natural to say "I expected him to come here" (meaning that you were actually waiting for him to come). or "I would have expected him to come here" (meaning that you thought it more likely than not that he would come).


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"Would have" suggests that, because something was a habit or a common routine for the subject, it can be assumed they did it on a specific occasion. Example: John would have used his car to get to work. This suggests that it was John's habit to use his car, so it can be assumed with a degree of certainty that he used it for this purpose, or on a ...


0

I would change one thing in your examples: You {verb}, I {verb}. I MAKE a difference. The word make, when used with I in the present tense is make. If you used the word “he” or “she” makes would then be correct. -I make a difference. -He makes a difference You do not need the “s” in your template.


0

He see a fly on his leg. He saw a lady in the crosswalk. He saw the lady in the crosswalk. on his leg and in the crosswalk are both prepositional phrases. They don't modify anything exactly though you might get away with saying these things are where they were seen, which means they are used adverbially. a lady is non-specific the lady is specific to a ...


1

Generally, you can't. For example, if you replace the phrase 'ask a question' with 'ask for a question', it will turn question into requested thing: the preposition 'for' here precedes that thing (= the person who asks would like to be asked a question). Sometimes, in informal speech that preposition (before the desired 'forgiveness' in your example) is ...


1

In this context, the verb 'to pace' is used in the meaning of 'setting/regulating the pace of' her (running), so it works as a transitive verb (meaning 3 here: https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pace ) with the direct object her (as opposed to the first instance of 'her' as a possessive pronoun).


-1

When you use the word "and", both before and after parts need to go along in every aspect e.g. word type, tense, sense of meaning. In this case the word "dispensing" is a gerund and locates after the word "and", so the word that you put before "and" as well need to be gerund, diagnosing. Additionally, if you think of another aspect by the sense of meaning, ...


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The first type of noun is the result of the second type of noun. The gerund is a verb acting as a noun & its product is the state of being of that first type. I produced a sentence. That producing resulted in a production.


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Because Hedra had had a shuffle when she'd first moved in, but this (whatever the author is describing in context) is not that shuffle.


1

I would say He will be allowed to go to te cinema, when/once he has finished his homework.


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She wishes I were gone. This is the grammatically correct phrase. The other phrase is incorrect from a grammar perspective, although it is used/seen due to "I was" sounding more natural than "I were".


1

All three are correct and mean almost the same thing. It is more a question of formality and intonation. I have never hear anyone talk like (1). We do no use that in speech often. The two last ones are correct but (2) has a more distant and formal tone. You should use (3), it is the type of language people expect to hear.


1

The word target has several meanings. In your case, target is singular [a person or a particular group of people that something is directed at, or that something is intended for]. The possible variant is The target audience for a project is children. Follow this link to learn more https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/target.


2

Using hyphens in compound adjectives, e.g. a two-seater aircraft, a high-school student, a heavy-metal detector, is considered compulsory in British English, but US English is more lenient, and hyphenation is optional except where ambiguity would arise without a hyphen, or where it is desired to help the reader. If you're unsure, use a hyphen. Hyphens in ...


2

No. The first dialog could go: What position are you in, alphabetically? I'm second, alphabetically. And the second: What position are you in line? I'm second in line. And note that in the second question, the in is part of the prepositional phrase "in line." So technically, the question is not grammatical because it means, "In what ...


2

The responses should be I'm second (in the gradebook). I'm second in line. Because your name is in the gradebook. Your name is not in a number. So "I'm second in number" is not correct. In practice the phrase "in the gradebook" would be omitted, because it is clear from the context. So the questions must be: What position are you in the ...


0

It means, "as things were perceived in that time."


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One would say "dance to the music" and "walk to the beat" but "words of a book" so I think because music is often related to verbs you can use "to" or "of" in this case.


0

Both would be understood, but I tend to agree with you that it should be "the lyrics of the song". The lyrics are considered a part of the song, and as such are spoken of in the possessive, eg "the song's lyrics". I suspect that the use of "to" comes from the fact that lyrics are words set to music. Historically, a lot of songs began as melodies only, and ...


1

Formally, "has finished," "had finished," and "have gotten." Colloquially, you'd be likely to hear "is finished," "was finished," and "get."


2

Following on from FumbleFingers' comment, the pizza is hers. To say that it was her would indicate that she had been turned into a pizza rather than being the person to whom it belonged. PS. I recently, with the approval of the Portuguese snack-bar owner concerned, scratched out the apostrophe in the sign on the toilet door reading: Customer's only - ...


0

You may use 'before' instead of 'as' if that's what you mean, but those words mean different things. In this context 'before' means prior to the event and 'as' means at the time of the event.


0

Your usage of when is common enough. Probably not going to be recommended by many authorities on style, but certainly not wrong.


0

The easiest way to read this is to understand the pronoun "which" to stand for "relationships" We've built good relationships with people's families, [and these relationships] really help us to develop ... Therefore there is no error in subject/verb agreement


1

There are two negations: I would rather not have shown him my love -- this negates the preference I would rather have not shown him my love -- this negates the showing In practice they mean pretty much the same thing.


1

You are correct on both counts. It should not make the slightest difference on which hand it is worn. This phenomenon is called extraposition. Here is what the non-extraposed version of this sentence would look like: On which hand it is worn should not make the slightest difference. The clause in bold is too heavy (that is, long) to sound natural in ...


0

The construction, "had X been Y ..." means essentially, "X was not Y, but in an alternate universe where X was Y ..." For example, I would have ordered chicken soup if it had been on the menu. or Had proper security been in place, the prisoner would still be in his cell.


1

No, your current construction is incorrect. It should be: I saw a gray and a black elephant. That is, I saw a gray elephant and a black elephant. The extra indefinite article "a" before "black" shows that you are talking about two individual things. Without the "a" before "black", it would be as though you are talking about seeing an elephant ...


0

You are right unless the author meant which in the restrictive sense, in other words unless the author intended to convey that the families with whom they've built good relationships are those families that really help... And that intention strikes me as unlikely.


1

It depends on what you want to say, if you look for the ways then you're looking for all of them, whereas if you're looking for ways you're looking for some ways but not necessarily all of them.


2

It's verbs that have subjects. The subject of your first verb, love, is I, and the object is the gerund phrase "watching movie." Within the gerund phrase, watching is the verb, and its object is movie. Everything else is a triple of prepositional phrases, each of which functions adverbially, as each modifies watching. As for Netflix, it's the object of the ...


1

Yes - if you use a whole word as a prefix it is normally hyphenated (unless a recognised compound word exists). Vertically-carved characters. You could, of course, omit the hyphen by saying instead: The characters are carved vertically.


5

The first example is incorrect. A compound adjective is formed by two (or more) words that jointly describe a noun. Such adjectives are usually hyphenated so as to indicate that they form a single unit. The use of a hyphen also aids clarity and removes any ambiguity for the reader. A better example of this is shown in the following sentences: I saw ...


2

Yes, it can be countable or uncountable. When uncountable, you would not use the possessive "have", as in your example. This is because, while the countable refers to one of the potentially many relationships you may have, the uncountable refers to a state or the concept of friendship. "Countable" Examples: I have a friendship with John. I have many ...


0

There are no nouns in your examples, only prefixes. Sometimes prefixes are hyphenated, sometimes not. "Repurchase" is a word, so you can use that without a hyphen. Most words with the "re" prefix are not hyphenated (eg regain, rejoin, remarry etc). "Post-process" seems to be a perfectly acceptable verb. It isn't the hyphen that makes it a verb, nor is "...


1

Classically, the past tense has been used for indirect speech (e.g. He told me that I was honest), but that is changing. If the condition / quality / etc. expressed is known to be or likely to be still true, the present tense if often used nowadays (e.g. He told me that I am honest). Therefore, depending on the context and on the age of the text, the ...


1

If you would like to stick as closely to your proposed slogan as possible, I would suggest altering it slightly to Makes a difference This links nicely to your second bullet point in that it is clear that wearing it will have a positive effect on the consumer. Your current phrasing is more like a command to someone else that they should make 'it' ...


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