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1

I believe that in your examples there is no difference. Because people will interpret it correctly. But strictly speaking when you add can it could point to someone having an ability to do a certain thing, and adding the word can would thus change the meaning of the sentence.. For example: I can see colours and I see colours The first one would ...


0

When the action is expected to have a duration, we use future continuous: In this episode, I'll be telling you how to do it. If the action is effectively instantaneous, we use simple future: In this episode, I'll tell you my email address As this is a matter of emphasis, you will find many native speakers use one tense when you might have expected the ...


1

Why do young people not have good manners? or Why don’t young people have good manners? (Note: manners is plural)


1

I bought two discounted Standard Airlines tickets to Honolulu...


1

Yes. Use sentence 1. It’s what a native speaker of English would use.


0

Do you (usually/habitually) have chicken for lunch? Yes, I do. No, I don’t. Do you have chicken for lunch? (currently in your lunch bag, for example) Yes, I do. No, I don’t. No, I haven’t. (British)


0

There is always another alternative, regardless of it being explicit or not. He called to check whether she was okay. (or not okay) She didn't know whether to continue with the plan. (or not continue the plan)


1

Economics as a field of study, is young but not new. Therefore it is plain wrong to speak of its development in the present tense. Therefore, the only good variant is: There have been economies since the dawn of civilization, but as a field of study, economics has developed only recently.


1

It is perfectly idiomatic to use sentence 1. Sentence 2 is OK also, but 2 letters longer.


2

This is a very subtle point. Most native speakers, including myself, would use "that" in this context. If I try and defend your lecturer's opinion, you could think of "the point" as a place. In that case, precise language would dictate that you use "where." Overall I disagree with your lecturer, though. I don't know if they are always interchangeable, but ...


-3

Nither of them is correct. You can write, i have bought 2 discounted ticket of standerd airlined to Honolulu. For is used for purpose, as i bought a car for my mother


0

No, in cannot always be substituted for during: I fainted during the movie. → I fainted while watching the movie. I fainted in the movie. → I acted in the movie, and the character I played fainted in a particular scene. Note that context determines the meaning. If you've clearly established that you were in the audience watching a movie, then using ...


1

There is a stylistic (and possibly semantic) problem with the sentence because it mixes two different pronouns, one of which takes a singular form and the other which takes a plural form. Any of the following would be quite fine: If one makes sure that one is rich and then gets married, one will be happy. If they make sure that they are rich and ...


1

If the policy and decision makers are a single entity then I'd write it like this... This study benefits vendors, and policy and decision makers If they are two separate entities then its clearer to write it like this using an Oxford comma... This study benefits vendors, policy makers, and decision makers The Oxford comma can be used as the final ...


0

You should use the second form in a modified version This study benefits vendors, policy makers, and decision makers You should also use benefits over benefit. If you want to use "benefit" it would make more sense to say "This study is of benefit to vendors,policy makers,and decision makers".


2

According to The Free Dictionary, it is an idiom and means: verb To take action to become well-organized, prepared, or in a better state of life. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between get and together. You need to get yourself together and finish packing so that we can leave for the airport on time tomorrow morning.


0

"The sky big and white" is just another version of "The sky was big and white". As Auxiliary verbs can be omitted in informal writing, the sentence is grammatical and makes sense.


0

The usage of "To ..., [Independent Clause]" in this case is as follows: The "To ... " portion tells the reader/listener what the speaker is about to do, or the aim of the Independent Clause. It describes the Independent Clause or the clause's function within a conversation. In this case it is saying "Hey, I am about to use a Star Trek term so get ready ...


1

To borrow a phrase from the old Star Trek series, the "prime directive" of the limbic brain is to ensure our survival as a species. You have explained that it is the preposition "to" at the beginning of this sentence that is confusing you. It is quite common to introduce a clause with a phrase containing to followed by an infinitive, for example: To be ...


2

The words are all have multiple senses, and the meaning in programming follows one of the existing senses of the words. Head, meaning "the first or top part of something" is a standard meaning in English. We say the "the head of the queue" or talk about "Section headings" in a document. Tail similarly has the meaning of "the end of something" Stack means an ...


1

I do not think this sentence is set up well, for exactly the reason you point out - there is no clear subject for have. I think there are two edits that would fix this issue, either replace for with that: I think that those of us who have jobs and have been working for some time have this habit of telling ourselves that we deserve to take the money that ...


0

"pre-authorization" is word that could be replaced with "before authorization." To my ears "pre" sounds like it is being used as a preposition even though it is just a prefix. "Pre-authorization" specifically is the phase of a trial/experiment one is in before authorization is given. It is technically being used as a temporal noun (I think that is the ...


0

Both of these read perfectly well to me. 2b It would be quite normal for cousins to marry is describing a a future hypothetical action (the cousins get married) from a point in the past where the cousins are unmarried. 3b Generally speaking, these marriages would succeed as well as any others is describe a future possibility (successful marriage) from a ...


1

Yes; however, in this case the result would be unclear to the listener or reader. A word can have several meanings. But when you use the word, we expect the word to take on a single one of those meanings -- unless the context clearly shows otherwise as you do here. In your example, "missions (diplomatic, ..., etc.)" makes it clear that we're using multiple ...


0

In both expressions "least" means "the smallest amount, number, or degree". You should at least take a sweater. This means "The smallest amount of clothing which you should take with you when you go out is a sweater." I must owe you at least ten dollars. This means "I am sure I owe you ten dollars, probably more." I am not in the least patient. I ...


0

The idiomatic form is Until when are you open? Just because people can figure out what is intended by something like "When are you open until" does not make it idiomatic. Moreover, you can avoid the whole issue by asking When are you open? which invites an answer of when do you open and when do you close. Furthermore, you can ask only about closing ...


-1

As you have mentioned @Vitaly this can be as interpreted as: I'm not patient at all.


0

This depends on whether the task is already being worked on or not. It's not entirely clear from the above, since the tense is not specified. I will give an example of either case: Writing on a cover letter in a job application (i.e. the managing is in the future): I am a well-organized person, who will manage all the tasks. Writing a self appraisal ...


2

Normally we'd say "a null pointer" because there can be many pointers with this value. Of course the value itself is unique, so we can say "... with the null value", but as the value fields are plural, we can say "... with a null value field" or "... with a null value". These would be common describing the programming language C or the basic machine ...


1

In this case "up from" is a prepositional phrase that compares the current value (Tk 120,043 crore) to a past value during a similar period (Tk 98,978 crore) If you put these numbers on a graph, 120,043 would be higher than 98,978 so it is "up." And since 98,978 is the past value, amound expended changed "from" that value. This is a common way to compare ...


3

Either is fine. It depends on the exact circumstances. As your example is written, using "chose" (past tense), this is the implied sequence of events: You (the audience) are going to meet a director This director is going to describe how to produce a play, using, as a model, a play she already produced. As part of this description, the director ...


1

We're going to meet a director. She'll describe the whole process of producing a play, including how she chose the actor. I believe whoever wrote this either made a mistake or it could also mean that the director is going to talk about a specific play and how she chose the actor, assuming for this play the actor was already chosen in the past.


0

As a serious answer to your question: I'm not clear that you should include "the first time" in this context, as it feels forced. It's hard to explain exactly how the phrase is normally used, but most of the time it's for events that are not too unusual or unrealistic. For example: Wow, this is the first time I've ever been kidnapped by pirates and ...


2

Both are fine. If you make it a simple statement, you almost always need the to: We want to go to Australia. We want to go to Paris. We want to go to your house. The only exceptions are adverbs and things that can behave as adverbs: We want to go South. We want to go home. So logically, the relative form should be "There are places ...


1

I am thinking what he would have wanted me to do first time while he is in coma. That sentence is a bit awkward, and it seems as if "first time" is qualifying "in coma", as if he has been in coma several times, or you expect him to be so. I would suggest: For the first time I am thinking what he would have wanted me to do, even while he is in coma.


0

This is a confusing sentence, but I would interpret the "will" here as meaning "must" rather than literally referring to the future. "They must have arrived yesterday."


1

Don't overthink it. It's a conditional sentence, so you definitely need "would." Since the second clause takes place in the present, it's present conditional: "we would be much more fluent in it now." The only weird thing you have to remember is that to set up the conditional, you use a past tense one step before the frame of reference rather than the word "...


1

The rule about not using "the" before proper names doesn't apply when you have something descriptive in between: a noun phrase like "British playwright," or even just an adjective like "wonderful." This is a way to refer to someone and also describe them - instead of saying "I want to thank Anna Karenina, who is a wonderful person," you can just say "I want ...


3

Without the surrounding context, assuming you are just talking about your parents in general, I would say "They have three children," or maybe "They have had three children" if you want to focus on the process of having (giving birth to) the children rather than the state of currently having (being parents to) three. However, given that you're telling a ...


1

It seems like "give/grant eligibility" is what is confusing you. eligibility (n): the fact of being allowed to do or receive something because you satisfy certain conditions: A "grants eligibility" for B, if A satisfies the conditions for B. "Granting eligibility to apply" is a participle phrase that modified the noun "degree". It is the same grammar ...


0

The sentence is correct and is not a case of double copula. It is called a "pseudo-cleft sentence." I just don't find the comma to be correct: What is elegant about this transpose operation is that we can take transposes of entire blocks.


0

As a developer, I would write this as "the return status" meaning "the status value returned by the function being tested". It could be written as "check that the function has a return status of STATUS_FAILED."


1

While the phrase As of 2019, Chrome usage is 50% is perhaps not strictly incorrect, as it can be interpreted as a compound noun, in my opinion here a possessive form is significantly clearer and better: As of 2019, Chrome's usage is 50% Better yet is to recast the sentence, as: As of 2019, the usage of Chrome is 50% As of 2019, the usage of ...


1

I don't know how you want the grammar explained, but the correct interpretation is that the the thoughts they each held were strange and new.


-1

Being very careful, I'd recommend Do you know when our next class starts because starting is not a process that takes place throughout an interval and so will seldom if ever strictly warrant a progressive tense. In actual practice, however, very few people are that exact in their language, and you will hear both forms used by well educated native ...


1

You can't just explain to somebody. You have to explain something to somebody. That means you cannot say explain me, him, her, etc. You must say explain something to me (to him, to her). For example: Please explain him the situation. (incorrect) Please explain the situation to him. (correct) In your example above, the first example you provided is ...


1

The specific syntax is wrong. It needs to be rephrased in some way: He needs to be told he is wrong. He needs to have it explained to him that he is wrong.


-1

If the parents are dead the past simple is used. I would use the present if the parents are living: "my parents have 3 children, I'm the youngest. The present perfect would be appropriate in a sentence like: "I have had three children, so my body has changed over time." have had = have given birth


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