New answers tagged

1

"As I said before" is correct, because you are emphasizing or restating that you have already said something, and there is no need to place a noun after "said." "As I told before" is not quite correct, because it raises the question "who have you told before?" "Told" must be followed with an object (noun), ...


1

Use "said" here. "Told" sounds very awkward. It is usually used with an indirect object: "As I told you before..." or with certain other forms like "He told of his adventure" (old fashioned). "Said" needs a preposition to take another object: "As I said to you before..."


0

Present continuous often combines with verb which express repeating action,but the verb "scowl" here is not to describe a repeating action.


0

Here, the word "only" shows that there is no other way that the shops could have stayed open. Without the word "only", there is a possibility that other methods (eg. taking out a loan) could have kept the shops open.


1

In each of these sentences, "got" is simply an informal way of communicating. "I got bored while watching serials" could be said like this: "I became bored while watching serials." "I was bored while watching serials" is grammatically correct, but it does not mean the same thing as "I got bored while watching ...


0

Instead of "In the following," you could simply say "Next,"


0

In this sentence, "only" is providing the specific reason for why the shops could stay open. If you removed the word "only" from the sentence, it would read "The shops could stay open because the owner paid protection money." This sentence would still be grammatically correct, but it fails to explain why the owner paid ...


0

Since the action is in the future, you need the future tense: "Please tell me if what I will do is wrong." I would suggest using "Please tell me if what I plan to do is wrong" instead. "What I will do" makes it sound like you've already made up your mind to do it, whereas "What I plan to do (want to do, intend to do, am ...


0

In the real world, you don't have to worry about being grammatically correct in direct speech; if you're quoting Lionel, you quote whatever he said, even if it was ungrammatical. If you're writing dialogue using direct speech, you should write what your character would say. That's probably what is grammatically correct at the time of the speech. "Have ...


0

Both present and past tenses could be correct, depending on what you mean. In the first example, when did the lack of answer occur? To use the present tense means there is right now no answer. To use the past tense means there was at that time no answer, but an answer may (or may not) have been given since then.


1

The question asks is "the colour (of her hair)" the same as "her hair colour" Normally these would be equivalent. Sometimes, in context, "hair colour" might mean the same as "hair dye", so it would be possible, in context, for "What is her hair colour" to mean "What brand of hair dye does she have?"...


1

Functionally, it's an adverbial phrase modfiying the main-clause predicate "wreaked havoc on the global jobs market" and introduces the consequence of the action.


1

How will we handle one-on-one instruction while social distancing? This sentence uses "social distance" as a verb, which is a neologism, a new usage. It is awkward, and probably best avoided. A more usual construction would be "while distancing socially". The phrases "social distance" and "social distancing" appear in ...


0

It's a conjunction, but it doesn't mean "so", it means "while". Cambridge "as" conjunction "during the time that: I saw him as I was coming into the building. He gets more attractive as he gets older." Many people are being laid off as employers cut costs.


0

To identifies an intent: target/destination or direction of facing, moving, or progress. Of identifies a connection: relationship, containing, ownership, reason or source. There are of course exceptions, idioms, fixed phrases, and edge cases where the above doesn't apply. It's possible for both of these to apply at once depending on what you An assistant to ...


0

There is no general rule for "when to use to and when to use of". It is an unpredictable property of the particular word involved. Assistant takes to for the principal person or role, not of: there is no way to predict this, you just have to learn it as part of the dictionary definition of assistant.


1

Let us look at some options if the people went on holiday for a week, the whole place would be reclaimed by the jungle by the time they returned This refers to a possible future event. They have not, as far as the speaker knows, been on holiday but if they did then the jungle would come back during the space of the week they were away if the people had ...


0

[1] I hope that [you have a good time with her] and [everything is going according to your plans. [2] [I hope that you have a good time with her], and [I hope everything is going according to your plans. In [1] the bracketed elements are a coordination of clauses functioning within the large content clause beginning with "that". No comma is ...


1

Rather than "independent clause" I'd describe these as two coordinated clauses: you have a good time with her everything is going according to your plans They are equal to each other and joined with the coordinating conjuction "and". A comma is correct, but I'd consider it optional, as both expressions are subordinate to the "I ...


3

Who/what/how/when/where/why questions "What country you are from?" is not a complete question-sentence. It refers to the answer of the question. You can put it in other sentences, including question-sentences: "I don't know what country you are from." "Please tell me what country you are from." "Does he know what country ...


1

The OED, s.v, for (prep., conj.), sense 19, says a. In the character of, in the light of, as equivalent to; esp. to introduce the complement after verbs of incomplete predication, e.g. to have, hold, etc. (see those verbs), where as or as being may generally be substituted. ... b. So with an adjective, as in to take for granted, to leave for dead, etc. for ...


1

Normal usage: If a person does something nice for you, you have to say thank you. [in general, a simple present is used] If a person did something nice for you [specific act at a specific moment in the past], you have to say thank you. [a specific act in the past even if the date or time is not given] If a person has done something nice for you [in the ...


1

I think either one is correct, at least in the US. The former is more common, and therefore sounds more natural. Oddly enough, some different forms sound more natural the other way: "A thousand dollars was spent", but "Hundreds of dollars were spent" both sound natural to me.


0

It should be "keep improving".


2

When talking about an amount of money, a singular verb is required, but when referring to the dollars themselves, a plural verb is required. Five dollars is a lot of money. Dollars are often used instead of rubles in Russia. Subject verb agreement


0

You would have to add in extra elements to make it flow naturally. I stroll in the park and see the small kids playing games and I listen to the birds chirping very melodiously. It does seem a bit contrived though and I would probably split it into two sentences. I stroll in the park and see the small kids playing games. While I am in the park I also ...


0

The meaning of "fly" here is this one: American Heritage Dictionary "fly' intransitive verb: c. To flee; escape. The meaning of "before" here is simply "in front of", that is they were confronted by their enemy, who were pursuing them. So, the phrase "the enemy before whom they would be flying" means "the ...


1

The sentence is correct, and natural, as it is now. You could also use "The procedure for receiving a passport was simplified; for example, the 5 years' residence requirement was lifted." (or was eliminated). I prefer a semicolon to a colon between the two independent clauses, since it's the standard way of relating two complete sentences. I think ...


1

Why isn't the definite article used in these cases although the context is specific? "The is sometimes used with uncountable nouns in the same way it is used with plural countable nouns, that is, to refer to a specific object, group, or idea." (owl.perdue.edu) You can speak about "social justice", as a general and universal concept, as ...


0

"When I was at the Academy" is an adverbial clause. When we put adverbial clauses at the start of a sentence, we normally put a comma between the adverbial clause and the main sentence. The longer or more complex the adverbial clause, the more important the comma. You can use a comma after a leading single word adverb, but it is definitely not ...


1

When will is used in an if-clause, it is restricted to its Deontic sense, which means 'be willing to'. So common politeness formulas with if, like If you will forgive us, ..., If you would allow us to ..., If you will give me a moment ..., mean If you are willing to forgive us, ... etc. That makes more sense in expressing politeness; asking for ...


1

... which in turn causes sea levels to rise, flooding many coastal regions [leading to loss of property and life.] The function of the bracketed non-finite clause is that of adjunct in clause structure, where it indicates a resultant situation. Note that it could be replaced with the less likely reason adjunct: "... which in turn causes sea levels to ...


0

It is a participle phrase, used descriptively or adverbially. Participles are formed from verbs in the "-ing" (present participle) or "-ed" (past participle, which is sometimes irregular). Present participles are "active" so it means that "rising sea levels lead to loss of property and life".


0

It's actually the reverse: an orange is more specific than oranges. An orange specifies a single orange. It could even be paraphrased using that word: A single orange has lots of vitamin C. One orange has lots of vitamin C. Oranges describes oranges in a general sense, not a specific sense. Although the meaning of an orange could be inferred, certain ...


1

Note that "If you will come over here I will tie your shoe for you" is perfectly legitimate English. It's not (necessarily) and "idiom".


1

"If you will" is an idiomatic phrase in this case: Said when politely inviting a listener or reader to do something or when using an unusual or fanciful term. [Lexico] The applicable part of this definition is "inviting a listener or reader to do something." We aren't talking about the first conditional. Instead, we are using an ...


0

This is idiomatic in (formally polite) spoken language. You can think of it as short for "If you will forgive us, we will take our leave, since our lunch is growing cold". The "we will take our leave" part is implied. The "if" is a way of saying -- in theory -- that we will only take our leave if you agree to forgive us for ...


1

With on, they are interchangeable. Staggering around the roof suggests to me that the man was going in a circle round the circumference of the roof (yes, I know roofs are usually rectangular, but you see what I mean).


2

I have no idea what a) is about. For the question about the girlfriend, in the sentence after you've identified her, you should use the pronoun "she": d) His death came about after his girlfriend, Sian Ellis, tragically died. She was due to graduate later that year. In later paragraphs, it might be better to refer to her as "Ms Ellis", ...


1

The most common idiomatic phrade is "Let me in" or the more formal one "Let me come in". Besides this you can use the phrase "Let me inside". Often when guards stand in your way and don't let you pass you can here "Let me through".


1

"Candy strip" is functioning as a verb. A "candy striper" is a volunteer nurse (from the narrow striped pinafores that they traditionally wore), so "Candy-stripe a cancer ward" means "Work as volunteer in a cancer ward".


1

Both these expressions are correct and the mean the same. "Let me in" is idiomatic meaning "let me enter" or "Let me go in". "Let me" can be used with a verb "Let me play", or a preposition/adverb: "Let me through" "Let me under the blanket".


0

No, the "its" sentence states that the people patronize that temple. They are some or all of the temples patronage. (note: patronize has two very different meanings) In the second sentence, it is possible that the patrons are not patrons of the temple, but only if the reader will already know that they were the patrons of some other establishment, ...


2

As you have pointed out, it's usually worded "I love myself" instead of "I love me". In fact, almost always. You ought to use the reflexive in such a case. However, this is not a mistake. Quite the contrary. It's a humorous situation, somewhat in the same spirit as referring to oneself "in the third-person". "because ...


2

A book about Christmas: a book where the topic is Christmas. A book on Christmas: see above; a book where the topic is Christmas. Could also be part of a sentence such as "I was given a book on Christmas Day," which would mean that the book was a Christmas present--here the "on" is relating to the act of giving, not the noun book. A book ...


0

(past) + (present) doesn't work in English. That's why we have the past perfect tense. Therefore, your examples should read: It would have been nicer, if you had come with her. (Or, alternately, "It would have been nicer, had you come with her.") I wonder how it would have been, if she had still been next to me. (Or, "I wonder how it would ...


1

The difference between I might go. I might have to go. Is the following: I might go - Means that there is a possibility that I will go. I might have to go - Means that there might occur a reason for me to go.


0

The sentence means that the man he is speaking of was the best choice (the fittest) to get the army out of its difficulties (to extricate it from its embarrassments) and to lead (to conduct) it to safety. The to-infinitive in that use is an infinitive of purpose. In the present, we could say He is the best man to save the army. meaning that he is the best ...


0

"impressed with yourself" means that Marco thinks he has done well. "enough for both of us" means that Elle contribution is unnecessary. Together they mean that Elle thinks Marco is so impressed with himself that he won't take any notice of what Elle says. The words "yourself" and "enough" are not really linked to each ...


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