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2 votes

Is it necessary to change this sentence?

We didn’t go farther because we would be killed if we got into their territory. We didn’t go farther because we would have been killed if we had got into their territory. Version 1 works in general. ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

Can we usually use the word still in a negative sentence?

She is still not here. She wasn't here. This remains the case. She is not still here. She was here. It is not that this remains the case; in other words, she is not here anymore.
ryang's user avatar
  • 155
2 votes
Accepted

Can we usually use the word still in a negative sentence?

Positive and negative are irrelevant to the usage of the word still. As used in the OP, "still" has a general meaning of "up to the present moment", and can be used to qualify ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
0 votes

food here (without an article)

Food here [in this country] is plentiful. Great wealth brings great responsibility. All is fair in love and war. Money is a necessity of life. mass nouns Mass nouns in general statements don't ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 45.5k
0 votes

Is this usage of "and" correct?

Coordinated structures should be of the same category. In your example, you are combining an infinitive phrase (to + verb) with a complementiser phrase (that + finite phrase).
ishtar's user avatar
  • 33
1 vote

Is this usage of "and" correct?

*She told us [to read the text carefully], and [that we should write a short review of it]. The OP's example has two complements to the verb head; the complements are bracketed. In such a ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

They have gotten the vaccine

Gotten is grammatically correct in your example context. Get is one of those words with several potential past participles, which include 'got' & 'gotten'. Both are grammatically correct but you ...
RadioRaheem's user avatar
4 votes

They have gotten the vaccine

Yes, "they have gotten the vaccine" is fine in American English. It's not especially formal, so an official report might prefer "they have received a does of the vaccine" or more ...
Juhasz's user avatar
  • 9,869
2 votes

What does"hope was all" represent?

The comment above answers this correctly. One could rephrase the sentence as "We could offer only hope..." or "We could offer nothing more than hope". The sense is that we have no ...
Jim Davis's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote

Is this sentence complex compound or simple

Maybe [the mall [where the store was located]] charged a high rent. The OP's example has its subordinate clause forming part of the subject and hence is not a complex sentence. Neither is it a ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

care of or care for

The second one is correct because care as a noun is normally followed by of, but as a verb by for. The expectant parents were taught about the care of a newborn baby. The new parents were taught how ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.5k
4 votes
Accepted

difference in nuance and frequency of usage between "Who'd have known?" and "Who knew?"

"Who knew?" is a "set phrase" - sometimes expressing genuine surprise, but usually an ironic response to some banal observation (similar to "No shit, Sherlock!"). "...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
0 votes

What is the correct reported speech for - She said to me, "When are we going to leave?"

Many get confused by this because as per the pronoun change rule in indirect speech - "The first person in direct speech changes as per the subject of the speech.." But in this case I think ...
James Mathai's user avatar
2 votes

What is the correct reported speech for - She said to me, "When are we going to leave?"

She said to me, "When are we going to leave?" A) She asked me when they were going to leave. B) She asked me when we were going to leave. Edit Collins Dictionary third section, sense (1) ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

My relatives and friends who

There is nothing wrong with it grammatically, but I would understand it to include your relatives among the people who love you. If you wish the description to apply only to friends, you can either ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.5k
3 votes
Accepted

"The teacher came to class and advised the students." Is this sentence simple or compound. Argument for simple is it contains singular subject

The teacher [[came to class] and [advised the students]]. is a simple sentence with compound predicate. A compound predicate occurs in a sentence when multiple verbs apply to the same subject. For ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

‘If you are not looking’ vs ‘if not looking’

Text no if not looking. Your interpretation is right. This isn't a proper sentence. Such notes may be quite common in short advertisement texts and should be understood to mean something like Text '...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

Is 'nowadays' a negator? / does it form a sentence whose polarity is negative?

Compare your sentence with e.g.: "At night, the stars are visible; in the daytime, they aren't as easy to see." or: "In the sea there are many fish; on land, there aren't so many.&...
Ilmari Karonen's user avatar
6 votes

Is 'nowadays' a negator? / does it form a sentence whose polarity is negative?

To test whether "nowadays" is a negator, we can see whether the combo of "nowadays" and a negative polarity item (NPI) is grammatical. One example of an NPI is "at all". ...
Rosie F's user avatar
  • 526
2 votes

Is 'nowadays' a negator? / does it form a sentence whose polarity is negative?

No. Nowadays is a partitive sentence adverb. It is used to give a time-frame to an action or state. It is used to describe both negative and positive actions and states. The inclusion of "...
user81561's user avatar
  • 2,579
5 votes

Is 'nowadays' a negator? / does it form a sentence whose polarity is negative?

I would say nowadays introduces contrast, not negation. Cambridge explains: We can use nowadays, these days or today as adverbs meaning ‘at the present time, in comparison with the past’: I don’t ...
fev's user avatar
  • 9,545
0 votes

"considered to be" and "considered as"

There is a difference between considered to be and considered as. If I say, for example, that I consider birds to be dinosaurs, then I am expressing my opinion that birds are dinosaurs. If I say that ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 7,057
1 vote

can any one explain the grammar in the sentence, especially the clause after than

[1] Her foot lands with such force --- so much more force than [I thought possible from that tiny body]. [2] Her foot lands with such force --- so much more force than [I expect from that tiny body]. ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
0 votes

can any one explain the grammar in the sentence, especially the clause after than

The present tense is often used in stories written in modern times. It was thought to make narrated action seem more vivid. Sometimes the narrator will slip into the past tense when relaying thoughts....
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
3 votes

Doing something vs Going to do something

You have chosen a bad example. "Going to do" is one way of talking about future events. It is often used when we think of the present as leading to the events in the future, as in "...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
0 votes

a mistake in the book or a deficiency?

No, there is neither a mistake nor a deficiency in the book. The passage you quote is pointing out that the perfect tense can be used for both things that are finishing now and for things that are ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 4,517
0 votes

"others took to finish" vs "others to finish took"

The second is wrong. The phrase "...the others to finish took" violates the typical order of constructing phrases involving time and actions. In English, we generally follow a Subject-Verb-...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 103k
0 votes

a mistake in the book or a deficiency?

If we are about to clean a room, preparing to clean a room, a room that has not been cleaned in a long time, we can say "This room has not been cleaned in a long time." And even while we are ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
0 votes

"others took to finish" vs "others to finish took"

The first one, …took to finish, suggests that everyone did finish. The second one, …to finish took, restricts the comparison to omit those who never did finish. Here, to finish could be replaced by ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote

Does this sentence lack a second subject: "This figure rose to 50% in 1991, but fell again by 5% in 2001"?

in your example, it is evident that it includes a compound predicate. We insert a comma between the two of them if the two elements could stand alone—if they are independent. That means it would be ...
KingofSpades's user avatar
1 vote

What's the correct passive form? change into passive

You cannot convert that sentence to a passive form because it is not a SVO sentence. The main verb is "expect", it is complemented by an infinitive clause "to have bought a new house&...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
0 votes

Tense choice| Grammar

At last (i) the train came and (ii) I have boarded it. - (i) "came" indicates the train's past action. (ii) "have boarded" indicates the subject's current state with reference to ...
user81561's user avatar
  • 2,579
0 votes

Tense choice| Grammar

If you are talking at a time that is situated immediately after the boarding you can use either tense; if any significant amount of time went by between boarding and the time when you are talking, in ...
LPH's user avatar
  • 821
2 votes

Tense choice| Grammar

The first one sounds odd to me with its combination of simple past and present perfect. That’s not to say that the two can never be used together: Her letter arrived yesterday, and I have answered it ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

The warm sand but hot water

There is nothing incorrect about "I lay on warm sand" or "I drank the warm water". The word "the" has its usual meaning, of marking the sand or water as "determined&...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
-1 votes

What's the correct passive form? change into passive

"By next month, a new house is expected to have been bought." From grammartop: To make statements with the Future Perfect Passive, use: will have been + Past Participle form of the verb
Amirreza's user avatar
  • 167
2 votes
Accepted

Difference between 'Do' and 'Should' when used in a question

'Should' is used in a question to ask the correct or best thing to do. 'Do' is commonly used in place of this modal verb. In your examples, there isn't any real difference in meaning. The difference ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 103k
0 votes
Accepted

Present perfect usage

last Tuesday I forgot to eat lunch Explicit time given in the past. Past tense for the verb. have forgotten I have eaten lunch on a number of occasions. This is the "experiential" use of ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
1 vote

Do we use a preposition after "use". For example:

No it is not correct. A better way to phrase it would be Grammarly is not allowed to be used in either quizzes or exams
Rohit Gupta's user avatar
0 votes

He hasn’t worked for years?

To summarise the comments: It could be either, the statement doesn't contain enough information to clearly say. Surrounding context would give the information.
Hmwat's user avatar
  • 96
1 vote

Is 'more other' grammatically correct?

"More" here does not modify "other". It modifies "resources". The writer is saying "more resources", not "more other". "Other" is also ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.3k
0 votes

Does using 'the fact that' at the start require a comma in the sentence?

Does using 'the fact that' at the start require a comma in the sentence? The subject is a noun phrase plus a defining relative clause -> {The fact that Julie got help when she needed it} and ...
user81561's user avatar
  • 2,579
1 vote

Does using 'the fact that' at the start require a comma in the sentence?

I wouldn't use a comma. Despite the opening "the fact that", the sentence structure has a simple subject-verb-object structure. No comma is needed. You can see that more clearly if we ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Is there the phrase "have an experience + to do something" correct? Is the phrase "learn about something. from ..." correct?

We learn about things from books. That is, preposition from casts "books" as a source of information. Preposition with would cast them as tools or implements. But your rationale (referring ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
0 votes

The cake expired back on/on December 31st

It's very common to say something like "back in 2010..." (we say in a year, not on) when referring to something that happened a long time ago. It is not just for emphasis - it sometimes ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 103k
0 votes

The Past Simple and Time Reference

"a tense that refers to a definite point in the past, which may be explicit through a time adverb or implicit through the linguistic context" So in "A friend sent me a box of ...
James K's user avatar
  • 223k
0 votes

What type of conditional clause is this?

If you think we are returning to those policies, then that is not going to happen. The practical meaning of this kind of utterance is I'm not going to assume that you think we are returning to those ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
1 vote
Accepted

Recent past action

English verb tenses do not distinguish between recent past and distant past. All the various past tenses -- simple past, past perfect, past continuous -- could refer either to recent past or distant ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.3k
0 votes

The Past Simple and Time Reference

That seems to be a misunderstanding -- simple past just means an action occurred, and is not continuing. There is no requirement of a time indicator. Question: "Did you eat lunch?" Answer: &...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
2 votes

"In which bar shall we go?" vs. "Which bar shall we go to?"

In American English, if you are asking about choosing a bar where you can have a few drinks at a casual get-together: Which bar should we go to? "go to" is used with destinations. If you ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k

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