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We are going a-whaling

This form of a- apparently comes from Middle English prefix meaning “up’, “out”, or “away”, and was used to produce new verbs like arise and await and secondarily to signal intensified action. It isn’...
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We are going a-whaling

I cannot find a suitable derivation or definition, but the addition of "a" in front of a gerund does not change the meaning. It is more common to find it in songs and poems than everyday use....
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3 votes

Confused about if there's any difference among these sentences

They all mean the same thing. The only difference is that native English speakers would only use the first one in natural speech. And maybe the second one. But very rarely would anyone use the third ...
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1 vote
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on a level so far as nearness to truth is concerned

The apparent meaning - 'different outlooks are not equally near truth' - seems clear enough, but the use of 'on a level' (Lexico - MW) to mean on a par with: Equal in importance or quality to is ...
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Does the word "THAT" in this sentence need to be replaced by the word "WHEN"? "Not a week goes by that I don’t wish I was never born."

Not a week goes by [THAT I don’t wish I was never born ___]. That bracketed expression is a relative clause in which "that" is not a relative pronoun but a meaningless subordinator ...
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2 votes
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Future or future continuous

You use them according to what you want to stress. If you simply want to convey an information in a neutral way, simple future is fine. If you want to stress that it is a continual process, or if you ...
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1 vote

It sounds very wrong to use the present perfect tense with 'while' or with a 'participle phrase', but is it grammatically wrong?

There is nothing wrong with the grammar of your sentence. Are you suggesting that the improvements to the amenities might have resulted in the loss of the trees?
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since 1980 vs from 1980

The word "from" could be used with an end-date as described in the answer by Yash Laddha. Or "from" can be used with "onwards" or "until now" to specify the ...
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2 votes

Is "I don't care about learning the stuff but rather if they would hire me" grammatically accurate?

While it sounds awkward, and I would add a comma, I believe it's correct to say: I don't care about learning the stuff, but rather if they would hire me. However, it would sound better if you made ...
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0 votes

If I had done it tomorrow, I would have cried

It's perfectly acceptable to say: If I had developed the photos after going back to my country, I would have cried the whole day. However, you cannot say: If I had done it tomorrow, I would have ...
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0 votes

Same...with construction

In the first example, if you mean that you and he went to the same school, the answer is No, that is incorrect. You have to say: He went to the same school as I did. He went to the same school as me....
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1 vote

Is "I don't care about learning the stuff but rather if they would hire me" grammatically accurate?

Yes, it means: I don't care about learning the stuff, but rather I care about if they would hire me. Using "about being hired" is also good
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3 votes

Up from yonder cottage goes a sleepy smoke

up from yonder cottage goes a sleepy smoke. What does it mean? A column of smoke is rising slowly from the chimney of that cottage, over there. "cottage" is used without an article ...
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2 votes

What type of structure is 'will not' used in?

The "will not listen" is present tense. It is a particular and idiomatic use of "will", and in this sense, it doesn't indicate the future. It is closer to the original meaning of &...
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Look out into the sky

'Look out to...' denotes looking far outwards, to the horizon, for example. It isn't idiomatic to use it with 'the sky'. We would normally say "*look up to the sky". But if you are trying to ...
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1 vote

role of the word (that)

During this paksha, Moon is ahead of sun by an amount [that is between 0 and 180]. This is a relative construction. The bracketed expression, "that is between 0 and 180", is a relative ...
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1 vote

role of the word (that)

M-W says that as a pronoun, that is used as a function word to introduce a restrictive relative clause and to serve as a substitute within that clause for the substantive modified by the clause the ...
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3 votes

Regarding the "whether... or ..." grammar structure, what informs the decision to use "whether it is..." or "whether they are..."?

I wouldn't use either. Using "it is" for something plural doesn't really make sense. However, the problem with "they are" is that (as xorsyst points out in a comment) it also ...
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Rule of this sentence with some other examples?

@James K may be correct in an extremely strict sense that what you are asking for is impossible. However, I'm guessing that someone set you those examples and is expecting you to find an answer. With ...
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1 vote

Regarding the "whether... or ..." grammar structure, what informs the decision to use "whether it is..." or "whether they are..."?

Something I feel some people missing is that there is an ellipses happening. The sentence can be expanded a bit to: Young people love testing and using different types of things, whether [the [type ...
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Is it wrong to write 'It is enough'

Please be careful: A general statement may begin with: It's enough to wash that car before driving it. It's enough to pay for the dinner. You don't need to do anything else. Enough of the money was ...
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3 votes
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Can you connect two questions with a comma?

Only when you make a list of more than 2 items can you use commas, but you must use 'and' to join the final two items. For example: What time does it start, where is it, and do I need a ticket? Just ...
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0 votes

Is it wrong to write 'It is enough'

"It is enough" (or "that is enough") is perfectly idiomatic. You are right that 'enough' can go before a noun, for example "enough water". But the word 'it' refers to ...
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1 vote

Is it possible to use the Past Simple Tense in the that-clause after the word 'suggest'?

"She suggested that I train as a teacher" is perfectly good and valid. It means the same thing as "... should train ...". The fact that "she suggested" it makes it a ...
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1 vote

Is it grammatical to say "effects of children's lives getting boring"?

There is no error and you could create a sentence such as Bad behaviour and a lack of respect are some of the effects of children's lives getting boring.
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1 vote

How do you mention a night between 2 days?

If you want to avoid misunderstandings (at a cost of creating a more wordy expression) the "The night of the 23rd/24th" or "23rd to 24th" are possible. Generally this isn't needed,...
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8 votes

Regarding the "whether... or ..." grammar structure, what informs the decision to use "whether it is..." or "whether they are..."?

With respect for @MarcinManhattan's answer - which I have upvoted - I would tend to use it, simply because it sounds more idiomatic to me. But then I'm British and it may not be the case with all ...
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How do you mention a night between 2 days?

"The night of the 23rd" is correct. If you mention any other night, it will sound like you're talking about two nights, not just one. Although technically nights both begin and end days, we ...
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7 votes

Regarding the "whether... or ..." grammar structure, what informs the decision to use "whether it is..." or "whether they are..."?

It seems to make the most sense to consider "things" to be the antecedent of the pronoun. Because "things" is plural, the pronoun should be plural, too: Young people love testing ...
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7 votes

Why are present participles used in this way? Do both passage convey the exact same meaning?

No, the two versions have different meanings. The original version can be re-written: Extreme heat also depletes the oil’s additives sooner, which alters the oil’s chemistry and prevents it from ...
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1 vote

The use of "such"

Let's start by rewriting the sentence in question into a more standard order without the interjection: The number of particles needed to make up a human being is of such an order that huge numbers of ...
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to understand vs to understanding

What may be confusing you is that we can say the key to understanding the world. The reason is the noun key, which can take a to- phrase. So this is the key [to [understanding the world]] where the ...
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1 vote

Grammar tenses in the past

As Kate says, both are fine. Which you would use would probably depend on what you intended to say. You are more likely to use the first as it stands, without adding anything to inform the reader more ...
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to understand vs to understanding

understanding the world is a gerund (it doesn't include "to"). The gerund can stand on its own as an object. If you want to use the infinitive (a different use of "to"), you need ...
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1 vote
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What does "Though few, if any," mean?

It is not "Though few, if any, figures" which you should Parse. The Parsing is "Though [few, if any], figures". Here we may take : "few, if any" = "some small ...
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What does "Though few, if any," mean?

You are partly right. The sentence that is puzzling you doesn't refer to 'him' (the prison escapee) at all. You don't give the source of the quotation, so the connection between the two sentences isn'...
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3 votes
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How to use the present tense when the story is in the past without seeming to look like it is a grammatical mistake?

Your rewrite sounds even better than the example from the book: I am sitting in the park, reading a newspaper, when all of a sudden this dog jumps at me. Provided sufficient context is provided, ...
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1 vote

Do my sentences have to be symmetrical when using the "not only...but also" grammar structure?

There is nothing grammatically wrong with what you wrote. What you received is stylistic advice. I myself would probably write Video games have a negative effect on children, not only on their social ...
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What kind of bounded sentence is this?

It would perhaps help you understand if the sentence were better punctuated. Were I writing it I would put a comma or an em-dash after "us". The main part of the sentence with an indicative ...
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0 votes

Title with apostrophe

It is often said in my workplace (the single largest employer in my country) that a person's job description is many times more important than their job title, which can often be very generic. It is ...
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2 votes
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Find out which part of the given sentence has an error?

The term "put up" is kind of old fashioned. It means to be placed in accomodation. So, it is not something you can do to or for yourself. Somebody else must do it for you. The hotel manager ...
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9 votes
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Is this way to use "unrequited" correct?

'Unrequited love' means love that is not reciprocated (ie you love someone, but they do not love you back, at least not in the same way). You've explained that you know this doesn't make sense with a ...
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1 vote
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Part this place = leave this place?

No, you can't speak of parting a place. You part from another person, or two people part when they leave one another's company. This is standard, current English but, as your dictionary says, the ...
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Can I use the definite article 'the' in this sentence?

You can use it if in the particular question you are considering there is usually a matter of confirmation involved and if you do so you are speaking about it as this determinate thing that people ...
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Rule of this sentence with some other examples?

I don't think what you want to do is possible. The construction "based on" has a passive participle "based". The (implied) subject of the participle is the grammical object of an ...
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3 votes

Confused about "he might have gone"

You're thinking about things in the wrong order. Here is the "right" way: Take two sentences. "He will go there", "He might go there". The first is about a certain ...
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  • 152k
2 votes
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Can the phrase "I think I got it thanks" offend people?

No it does not! I read it and found no sarcasm or evidence that this could possibly offend someone. This response can be used in many cases when one understands what someone is trying to say. There is ...
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1 vote

Can the phrase "I think I got it thanks" offend people?

That's a perfectly good response in informal English. It means "I believe that I understand" and (if you are being asked to do something) "I will do it." There is no sarcasm. I ...
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Explanation of "did was [verb]" structure

Your question was how to explain the verb structure of this sentence: "All I did was hand someone a bag." I think essentially there is something that resembles a syllepsis. Take a look at ...
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1 vote
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They were split into half or halves?

Many people in the comments have given great suggestions: they were (all) cut in two they were (all) split in two they were (all) split in half they were (all) cut in half they were split into two ...
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