New answers tagged

0

I would say, "I don't like feeling vulnerable." Or, "I was crippled by feelings of vulnerability" (this is an example of where passive voice is appropriate to emphasize that the speaker is being acted upon by something else)


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You’re right about the tense of the second sentence, Joseph; it isn’t correct. If you’re going for present tense — as in ‘she would become happy if you sent this box of chocolate to her now’ — it should be: She would be happy if you sent her this box of chocolate. If you used ‘send’, it would become future tense and you would have to use ‘will’ instead ...


1

The author intentionally left out commas and repeated "and ... and... and" to give the sense that the soldiers had an overwhelming variety of weapons. This is an example of "poetic license" (or "literary license").


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Contrary to what some have said, this is not a matter of opinion. There is, in fact, exactly one right answer to this question, but it's not necessarily obvious without careful examination, even for many native speakers.. To make things easier, let's simplify the sentence a bit first. We can eliminate a few extra bits in the sentence above without really ...


3

That passage is part of a litany describing the variety of things that were carried by American soldiers in the Vietnam war. I don't think you can definitely determine the scope of the adjectives in that list unless you have knowledge of the actual armaments described. I think it should be read by separating it by the "and"s, and considering each adjective ...


3

It's "grain" for all except "tea". That could be a "tea leaf". If it's a little piece of dried leaf, you might call it a "flake".


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To put it simply, the second one is not a question. It is a statement or proposition. It could be the title of an essay that argues that "art" is a "culture" (not sure the concepts fit together, but nevertheless). The form is similar to many argument summaries: "Why movies are a form of art" or "Why painting is like theater." Think of these sentences: "Why ...


0

I don't know whether it's what you are looking for, but they are examples of tautology - saying the same thing twice in different ways - which is an error. If you refer to glueing something, it's superfluous to add 'with glue'; to juice something is, by definition, 'to obtain juice'.


2

You're combining two pieces of information in one sentence, but trying to keep them separate at the same time. "There is a page for creating user profiles, and another for editing them." That might be clearer. The added bit about "filling in blanks" could be omitted. Doesn't all data entry work that way?


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So it will be easier to access it This is OK. So it will be easier to access to This isn't grammatically correct; the closest correct version I can think of would be So it will be easier to gain access to. However, I would probably choose neither, and instead simply say: So it will be easier to access.


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Steve and Kate are right that this isn't really an appropriate question for this site, but I'll do my best to help you out anyway, in brief. On Friday, my father took me to the library and I returned the book I had borrowed. The next sentence is in the wrong tense to fit into the story, but I'm not sure exactly what you meant to say. I ate spaghetti ...


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Both are correct. Likewise, What is the DEADLINE? or When is the DEADLINE? See more examples from LONGMAN • The new Jan. 22 due date also applies to taxpayers in Washington, Mr Keith adds. • The amount and due date will be announced in advance. • It was less than satisfying; and yet as his due date neared he kept on, sometimes all night. • A loan stock ...


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In casual, every day use, both would be fine, but if you want to be strict, you would either say: "What is the due date for this assignment" or "When is this assignment due?" The "what" is asking for a specific name / figure denoting a point in time, and the "when" is actually asking for a point in time - the answer does not have to take the form of a date....


1

(As Michael Harvey indicates in a comment) This is an informal pattern mostly in American dialects. It is standard English to use a to-infinitive with come (and other verbs of motion) do give the reason. "He will come to fix my TV." You can also express nearly the same with two coordinated clauses: "He will come and fix my TV" It is possible to drop ...


0

Yes, so refers to resigned. He is saying, in a very convoluted manner, that he feels more resigned to Lizzy's refusal because he is beginning to think she wouldn't have suited him anyway. BTW, it's Austen with an 'e'!


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'It was a present', because the discussion is about the past transfer of ownership. 'It is a present' is something a giver could say, at the time of giving, maybe to remove doubt over whether payment is required, or whether it is to be returned later.


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1600's may refer to: The period from 1600 to 1699, synonymous with the 17th century. The period from 1600 to 1609, known as the 1600s decade.


1

No, it is not. ‘Minimize’ is a verb, and while some verbs can be nouns, this one can’t. Alternative forms that have a similar meaning and would be grammatically correct in that situation might be ‘minimum’ or ‘minimisation’, so The global minimum has been reached. Or Global minimisation has been reached. Take care that you don’t mix them up, however;...


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Both "threw it into the hallway" and "threw it out into the hallway" are correct and sound fairly normal. There isn't a lot of difference in meaning between them, either, so they're basically interchangeable. When you include "out", you are emphasizing a bit more that you are throwing it for the deliberate purpose of getting it out of your room, but in ...


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This is not grammatically correct. In its current form, you have three (plural) nouns right next to each other with nothing connecting them, which is pretty much never right. You need to start with one noun which indicates the actual (single) thing you are talking about, and then you can modify it with additional adjectives or possessive forms, etc. from ...


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It's extremely unlikely in the specific cited context, but in general, this kind of "do-support" is used to convey emphasis (particularly, emphatic refutation of a claim made or implied by someone else). In speech, the word do (or does, don't, etc.) usually carries heavy stress, which also reflects that emphasis. Thus I do love you could either occur as a ...


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The first one seems more natural. The second seems to imply something the phone itself is experiencing, something akin to tribulations. As in "the trials of drug use" which speak to the problems of drug use as opposed to "the drug trials" which would precede their approval for use.


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As for the specific question being asked, you would be much more likely to encounter "profits show improvement over time", or some other variation using "over" (at least in US usage, I suppose elsewhere may differ).


2

The form you have proposed is not correct and not idiomatic in English. To express the idea behind it, you can say: "How can I decide which book to read fully, and which to read [only] a summary of?" Another possibility is: "How can I decide which book to read fully, and which book to read only as a summary."


-1

Yes, it is! Since you have been doing multiple experiments for each device; and have applied it to several devices; and, how you said, each experiment in each device is composed by more than one algorithm, it make sense to title it with all words in plural tense. However, as you want to emphasize the algorithms of the experiments made over the devides The ...


3

(For context, Sheldon is discussing the famous double-slit experiment in physics.) Using "each" instead of "either" would change the meaning of the sentence. Let's work with a simpler version of the sentence: If either slit is observed, the photon will not go through both slits. In context, "either" implies a choice between two options. During the ...


1

I think you may be overthinking this a bit.. When using reported speech (but not a literal quotation), in general, you should describe the speech based on what is true relative to the current point in time (the point in time when it's being reported, not the point in time when it was spoken). So if the person speaking was talking about something that ...


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All of those choices can be used, and they're all fairly natural. The choice is mainly one of style and feel. In general, the more words you use the less forceful or active it will sound, but other than that there's not much difference.


1

‘The’ is used when what you’re referring to is obvious. If there’s a university across the road that everyone goes to, and the person you’re talking to knows it, you’d say ‘the university’. However, if you don’t want to name the university, or it isn’t obvious what you’re talking about, you would say: ‘she’s at a university’. Likewise — if there’s only one ...


1

Your question is more correctly stated "How can I tell my teacher that I have finished my homework? (I did it in the past.)" The answer is "I have finished my homework" or simply "I finished my homework."


-1

I think the first sentence(She clutches her wound which is bleeding heavily.)is better 'cause it's odd to say the other one.


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This paragraph is very poorly written. If I were the writer's editor, I would reject it and tell the writer to fix the run-on sentences and incorrect punctuation. Furthermore, the speaker in the direct quote rambles from thought to thought without much consideration of whether what she's saying is grammatically correct. I would analyze this as the ...


0

The question has gotten it wrong. A is the correct answer. If the question said Hindus have practised idolatry, then the correct answer would be B. The rule is that the tag question has to agree in tense with the main sentence and therefore use the auxiliary verb that the main sentence uses. If there is no auxiliary verb, then use the form of do that ...


2

These can be confusing. :) Along with several other related meanings, one of the uses of can is to express ability. So, the weather has the ability to change very quickly in the mountains. Could is also used to express ability (also along with several other related uses), but in the sense of possibility or likelihood of happening. So, if you say that the ...


1

Tag questions are used to confirm or check information or yet to ask for agreement. And it's formed by an affirmation followed of a question made by the negation of its auxiliar verb This way, since your question is in the present, option a is the right complement. Hindus (do) practice idolatry, don't they? You just could finish it with haven't they? ...


1

For sentence (1), either singular or plural could be used. It does not matter that "people" earlier is plural, because "people" is actually not the subject of that verb (it is only part of a sub-clause used to set the context for the main sentence). The core of the main sentence is actually: Wearing a medical mask in the community is not recommended. ...


1

I think both should have a comma after "wound". Other than that, they both say the same thing, and I would prefer the version with less words.


1

About playing different sports: - to play basketball, football, volleyball, tennis, golf = that means they do that sport. When a ball is involved, one usually uses the verb play. for athletics, judo, karates or other martial arts, the verb is do. John does karate but Mary does judo. When the body is involved as the main idea, the verb do is used. for ...


1

The context of the statement is Marx's belief that capitalism "would become decreasingly competitive" due to the growth of companies to large size. The author thinks that Marx missed the fact that small companies could flourish among large ones because they could take advantage of new opportunities at much less expense than large ones. An example chosen is ...


0

Looking at your particular examples, "Playing" can take the name of a game as its direct object. "Goes" is used with gerunds (verb forms) describing activities which require leaving home to do. "Does" is used with activities named by nouns, not gerunds derived from verbs. These are observations; there may be exceptions.


2

What is usually used when the number of options or items that we're choosing from is unknown or a lot. As for which, it's used when we're choosing from a limited number of options or items. consider the following sentences: Speaker A) Hey, I want to order some food, you want anything? Speaker B) yeah, what are you having? speaker A) I don't ...


-1

Present simple is used in the following cases: 1- to describe habits, routines and facts. 2- to talk about a schedules future event 3- To tell stories (particularly jokes) to make your listener or reader feel more engaged with the story. I guess your question pertains to the 3rd use. sometimes we use present simple to engage the listener or the reader in ...


1

The bare answer "Neither." in this context is a shortened form of "It is neither the 19th nor the 20th". It is a conjunction. See AHD "neither" 1


0

If someone says that you had better do something, they mean you should do that thing, now or soon. If they say that you had better be doing something, they mean that they expect you to be doing that thing now (or already), and the speaker will be angry (or you will get in trouble, or a bad thing will happen) if you are not.


1

A hot potato is definitely something you don’t want to hold with your bare hands for a long time, because it would burn your fingers. This is a conditional sentence that states a condition that will cause a specific result. Use of the simple present "it burns" states something is happening now, not might/probably/will happen. This if/then construction ...


1

Use a question mark. This is a rhetorical question, we don't expect the person to answer the question. Nevertheless it would normally be punctuated with a question mark. In speech it would also have question intonation (rising slightly). Sometimes an author will break this rule in order to indicate that a particular phrase was spoken with a particular ...


2

Neither is correct. ‘Be’ has to be used twice or it doesn’t sound natural, as in ‘What would the necessary and sufficient conditions be for the distribution of A to be the same as B?’ or ‘What would be the necessary and sufficient conditions for the distribution of A to be the same as B?’ This is because you’re using the verb ‘to be’ to refer to two ...


2

As is often the case with expressions of aspect in English (perfect, continuous), the difference is not in the objective facts, but purely in how the speaker is choosing to present them in time. If the speaker says "She wasn't even bothering", they are choosing to present the period when she might have bothered as an extended period, and positioning the ...


0

It is not a sentence. It is a noun phrase. The main noun is "Motorist" It has a determiner "The" and two adjuncts (descriptive phrases) a proposition phrase and a participle phrase. [The motorist] [in the middle of the road] [lying beside his damaged vehicle.] There is no finite verb, and no main clause. So it is not a sentence. It is not clear if ...


1

fused in the geometric patterns which decorate pottery and carpentry We're talking about patterns that have been found on actual pottery. fused in the geometric patterns to decorate pottery and carpentry We're talking about patterns more abstractly, in this sentence we don't have actual pottery/carpentry in mind. This also expresses that it's possible ...


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