130

Often the countable and uncountable versions of an English noun will refer to different things. For example, "hamburger". If you say, I love hamburger it means that you enjoy the actual ground meat, in all its various uses. On the other hand, I love hamburgers means you like the specific use of ground beef in a hamburger, with the bun, lettuce,...


43

Subjects expressing periods of time, amounts of money, or quantities may take either singular or plural verbs depending on whether [they] represent a total amount or a number of individual units. For example, "Four weeks is not enough vacation time" and "Two days have passed since I asked for your response." (Section 2 paragraph 8 of source) In your example,...


42

The latter is correct. If the meaning is essentially There should or must never be any additional uses of nuclear bombs on cities or against people, as occurred in Hiroshima (and in Nagasaki) in August, 1945, it must be No more Hiroshimas. People who use this expression are likely using Hiroshima to stand for the bombings of both cities. Hiroshima then, ...


36

Generally, when units of measure are used as adjectives, or as part of a compound noun, they are singular. When expressed as simple nouns, they are plural. Thus, A ten-year-old boy is sitting on the couch. The boy sitting on the couch is ten years old. The boy sitting on the couch is a ten-year-old. As for the hyphenation, exact usage is a ...


34

Them not only stands for people, it also stands for things since it's the general plural for it. It works like this: — Can I eat those apples? — Yes, eat them all.


32

In this case you are talking about the option you choose in a game. You could read the sentence as The option scissors cuts the option paper or, abbreviated, Scissors cuts paper So while "scissors" is plural and you would always say "scissors cut paper", in this case the word refers to an option within the game (singular) rather then the actual item. ...


28

This sentence has three important factors to consider: it is an existential construction, the displaced subject of the sentence is a noun phrase coordination, and the coordination is a list (more than two items). In this particular case, is would be the safest choice (i.e., least likely to run afoul of any rules), although The Cambridge Grammar of the ...


26

The <new value> is ten times the <old value>. For example, The character's IQ is ten times the character's INT rating.


25

Use brothers in both speech and writing. Brethren is a very old plural which is no longer in use, except in very narrow contexts: in works of fiction which depict historical times, or try to create a similar 'atmosphere'; in religious (or quasi-religious) works which embrace the language of the King James Bible; and in works which allude to uses of this ...


25

Both will be correct, depending upon the context in which you want to use them. If you are referring to the CITY in particular, then it will be "No more Hiroshima". However, if you are referring the incident that occurred there, it will be "No more Hiroshimas".


25

Those people aren't English. They're Australian. In both these sentences English and Australian are adjectives. A singular noun would have a qualifier in front of it: He's an Australian, and a plural noun usually ends in an s: They're Australians. In the English language, each adjective only has a single form, regardless of number (i.e. whether it's ...


24

Both are correct, depending on what you mean to say. "Everyone has their own story" means "Each person has his or her own story" while "Everyone has their own stories" means "Each person has many stories." An individual person can have many things, and a group can collectively have one thing, so the object doesn't have to match the subject: "Dan has many ...


22

The word "police" is rather special: It has no singular noun form. Something like that police over there is securing the scene would be incorrect. One would always construct sentences in the plural form like so: The police are out in force today. Anything done by the police will reflect on them. Other words that take no singular form would include ...


22

No More Hiroshima is what almost happened in WW-2. No More Hiroshimas is what we say to indicate that we don't want that to happen again. At best, the former sounds like a clumsy attempt at the latter.


22

The third-person (that is, neither the speaker nor the person spoken to, but some “third” person) singular pronoun is, unusually for English, broken up into three forms based on the gender of whatever the pronoun refers to. These are he/him/his (masculine), she/her (feminine), and it/its (neuter, explicitly inanimate or at the least non-person).1 It should ...


20

When we cite acronyms, or words or even phrases, we treat the whole citation as singular. A citation is when we mention the acronyms or words but we aren't actually using them in a normal way in the sentence. We could, for example, put the word(s) or acronym in 'quotes', or in italics: AIDS is short for Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome 'Not very tall' ...


20

I don't know who told you that you can't use umpteen before million. M-W's Student Dictionary seems to disagree with that assertion: umpteen (adj) numerous but not fixed in amount : umpteen million things to do So, grammatically, I don't find anything wrong with your translation. That said, umpteen is an informal word in English – note how Macmillan ...


19

SOME of the rules around 1 are: "X somethings" when X is not 1 For 1 and 0 amounts with decimals pronounced "0 point Y" and "1 point Y", it is somethings: 0.5 somethings, 0.1 somethings, 1.5 somethings, 1.1 somethings For quantifications ending on a something, we have half a something, a quarter of a something because it is still relative to 1 (or a) The ...


19

A [plural] Is never correct in any sentence, so the correct sentence is: Who needs dragons? Which means 'Dragons aren't very useful', or: Who needs a dragon? Which means 'Why would anyone want to own a dragon (as a pet)?' The reason it's "Who needs..." and not "Who need..." is because of how this verb conjugates: "I/You/We/They need", and "He/She/...


19

The word "pile" is a countable noun, and "rubble" is an uncountable noun. So you can say "a pile of rubble" and "piles of rubble", but you cannot say "a pile of rubbles" and "piles of rubbles".


18

The correct use changes depending on the sentence: Do you have any idea how to do this? Do you have any idea what to do? Do you have any ideas for me? Do you have any ideas for how to do this? It seems that, if the singular or plural noun (idea) is directly connected by a subordinating conjuction (how / what / where / which / that), you use the ...


18

Police is a plurale tantum, a word with no singular form. The police are here.  ← This is okay. *A police is here.     ← This is not. Most of the time, if you'd like to talk about a single officer of the law, you say a police officer, or just an officer: A police officer is here.  ←  This is okay. Several officers arrived.  ←  This is also okay. ...


18

The general rule (which I am coming up with as I write) is this: In referring to a general state of affairs, when nouns are countable and uncountable (pizza, bread, coffee, etc.), the uncountable noun usually will be used. The countable one is used for a specific quantity. "I love pizza" but "Today I ate three small pizzas". Love is a splendid thing. I ...


18

Both can be considered correct, but I think there are good reasons to prefer "is". If you say "100 apples are [something]", there's an expectation that what you're saying applies to each apple individually. For example, if I tell you "ten children are playing football", you'd expect me to be able to justify my claim by pointing at each of the children and ...


18

First of all note the difference between fearful & fearsome I suppose you could make the jump from singular to plural without anyone noticing, but I'd do it using the comma as your 'jump-point'... The gorilla has often been portrayed as a fearsome animal, but in truth these shy apes rarely fight over sex, food, or territory. Otherwise use ......


17

As snailplane and Man_From_India tell you, your question does not involve adjectives, which never have a distinct plural form, but attributive nouns. The singular form is certainly the ‘default’ for attributive constructions, but plural attributives are not uncommon. Some of these (and probably most of the older ones) come about because the singular and ...


17

The reference is to the US tv show 'The Big Bang Theory', and to one of its main characters Dr Sheldon Cooper. He speaks excellent if highly idiosyncratic English. I listened carefully to a video and he does say 'cuts'. While grammatically 'scissors cut paper' is correct, explanations on the internet of the standard game 'rock-paper-scissors' and the Big ...


17

It's a bit mathematical so I don't know if would work in your case, but you could say it's an "order of magnitude" higher. Orders of magnitude are used to make approximate comparisons. If numbers differ by 1 order of magnitude, x is about ten times different in quantity than y. If values differ by 2 orders of magnitude, they differ by a factor of about ...


16

The subject here (everyone) is singular, so ordinarily you'd expect the the pronoun that refers to the subject to be singular. But English doesn't have a gender-neutral, singular third person pronoun. You can say Everyone has his own.... or Everyone has his or her own.... But except in the most formal writing, it's acceptable to put gender ...


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