3

Here is one example of acceptable but not elegant usage. "Is the motor damaged?" "No it is not. I have examined it. I have found it working."


2

If the meaning of the original sentence is negative, you agree with it using the same pattern as though it had contained the word "not": I never have breakfast at 8 o'clock. You can respond: Neither do I. Nor do I. Nor I. (Very formal) I don't, either. (Slightly informal) Me neither. (Informal) Me either. (Informal, considered incorrect in BrE [...


2

The author wants to clear the image by stating that 'style'. Probably, it's a pretty common style adapted by schoolboys. Like this -


1

Yes, "schoolboy style" is acting as an adverb modifying the verb "tied". The suffix "style" (sometimes written as two words as here, sometimes hyphenated like "schoolboy-style") means "in the style of", or even more explicitly "in the style often adopted by", so we could reword the phrase as: His ...


1

Formally, as others have said here and in previous answers to similar questions, "you" is the pronoun that determines the number of the following verb, hence: "It's you who have changed." In colloquial usage, "It's you who's changed" is very common, and most native speakers wouldn't see anything wrong with it. NGrams here.


1

Despite their name, adverbs don't have to modify verbs; they can modify other parts of the sentence. Lexico defines an adverb as follows: A word or phrase that modifies or qualifies an adjective, verb, or other adverb or a word group, expressing a relation of place, time, circumstance, manner, cause, degree, etc. You are correct about this sentence: The ...


1

I mean, you can say It was great to meet you, but Nice to meet you Is more commonly used.


1

Present Perfect is normally used when there is a connection with now. "websites I have visited" suggests that you have finished visiting websites, so there is no connection with now. "websites I have been visiting" suggests that you are continuing to visit websites.


1

Both "never" and "hardly ever" have negative force, just like "not", so "Me neither." works fine as an answer. So, "I never eat breakfast." means the same as "I don't eat breakfast." "Hardly ever" is equivalent to "rarely", and could also be answered by "Me neither."


1

All but three of the answers look idiomatic: In the third set, My son doesn’t smoke. — Neither does mine. / My son (doesn’t smoke) either./ Mine doesn't / Mine neither. The answer "My son (doesn't smoke) either." is incorrect without "doesn't", because it lacks the negation. The answer "Mine doesn't" would be used for contrast ...


1

Additional context would be helpful to verify if the sentence is conveying the intended message or not, and if there is a better way to phrase this that is clearer or more polished. I assume the author has determined that something supposedly broken is actually working. Depending on the situation, there are many ways to state this. Examples: "I have ...


1

While the two sentences theoretically mean the same thing, only the first is neutral in tone. The phrase "some woman" in the second sentence has a derogatory sense about it, as if the woman is unsuitable company for the hearer. However "some woman" may also be admiring, more likely as "that was some woman waiting for you". The ...


1

There was some woman waiting for you This usually implies disrespect or disapproval. Example Wife: When I got home today there was some woman waiting for you. Husband: Really? What did she want? Wife: I didn't ask. I told her if it was urgent she should phone you. Note that the wife in this scenario is probably angry/jealous in this situation. She is ...


1

"Some woman" is a disrespectful way of referring to an unknown woman, and may suggest that the speaker disliked or mistrusted her. "A woman" means what it says.


1

Using a gerund is grammatically correct in this context, but the to-form also conveys a sense of purpose, like "in order to", which is more appropriate as a reason. According to this NGRAM graph, "reason than to keep" is about ten times as common as "reason than keeping".


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