4

Completely different! Let us try to parse these: [It (subject)] [always (adverb, modifying the verb)] [works (verb)] [for me (prepositional phrase)] Here "works" means "functions correctly". It refers to the machine that may misfunction. [It (subject)] [is (verb)] [always (adverb, modifying is)] [work (noun, complement of "It is&...


3

There are two superficially similar structures: I see her make a cup of tea. I see [that] she makes a cup of tea. (I've put "that" in brackets, because it is optional). So see can take either an infinitive clause or a finite clause. To my ear, there is a slight difference in meaning: the first says that I see the process; the second says that I ...


3

Neither sentence is idiomatic or natural English. They are also not grammatical English, but that is a minor flaw that could be fixed. But even if the grammar errors were fixed, the sentences would be utterly odd and not idiomatic. Do not try to "build upon" such sentences. They are not a good foundation for constructing clear sentences in English....


3

You can use both expressions but they differ in meaning: At or in? In the night usually refers to one particular night; at night refers to any night in general: I was awake in the night, thinking about all the things that have happened. ‘It’s not safe to travel at night,’ the officer said. (Cambridge) Which is probably why Gngram finds much more instances ...


2

In my experience, UK speakers would likely say “loads of work” while that would be less common in the US, where “a lot of work” or “lots of work” are more used. In either case, “much work” sounds stilted and probably wouldn’t be used very often, at least in conversation.


2

The morning - noun used attributively, i.e. operating as an adjective rain - noun "the morning rain" = the rain in the morning clouds (verb) - to cloud - to obscure or cover with mist or to cause the misting or obscuring of something.) Probably a reference to the condensation that appears on the inside of a window pane when rain falls on it. up - ...


2

It's a full sentence. "Clouds up" is a phrasal verb (transitive, with "my window" as its object), and "the morning rain" is of course the subject.


2

Both are correct, but convey slightly different emphasis, this is because of a slightly unusual situation that adjective and past participle are not derived the same way, as such exempted (p.p.) and exempt (adj) are distinct words. Exempt - adjective and verb Exempted - p.p. of exempt Other examples: Open/Opened Legal/Legalized Examples taken from: https:/...


2

The "meat" of your sentence, the subject/verb pair, is I see. The verb to see is conjugated to agree with the subject I. The rest of the sentence is an object phrase. What do I see? I see her. What do I see her do? I see her make a cup of tea. When the verb is part of an object phrase like this, we use the bare infinitive form, as this website ...


1

When we perceive an action (see, hear, feel, etc) we may use the base form (infinitive) of the verb for the action. I see her make a cup of tea. I heard the choir sing in the church. I felt the house shake when the wind blew. Hear, see, etc. + object + infinitive or -ing (Cambridge Dictionary) We can also use the gerund (-ing) form of the verb (e.g. making,...


1

"Be" in this context means "occur" or "happen" or "come about." "For" has the meaning of "until." You are correct that "ages" means "a long time," but in this context it really means "a long time from now." So: The next [opportunity to go] might not occur until [a long ...


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