5

"They" is a subject pronoun and, as the name implies, is used as a subject. "Them" is an object pronoun and is used as a direct or indirect object. This is an example of grammatical cases which are a feature of many Indo-European languages: some sources describe English as having subjective, objective and possessive cases. The impact of these cases is ...


5

Offhand I can't think of any contexts where more doesn't carry strong (but perhaps implicit rather than explicit) connotations of "comparison" (with something / someone else that's less). Unquestionably, the cited example states how ambivalent Plato was by comparison with Photius and John Tzetzes. But all it says is Plato was more ambivalent than them - he ...


2

The passive in English is always, whatever the tense, conveyed by the so-called past participle, usually following a part of "be". (Colloquially, it can follow a part of "get" instead"): He is heard. He will be heard. He got heard. Most verbs form their past participle with -ed: loved, liked, appreciated, angered, buried, created. Some form it ...


2

Your sentence raises several questions. As you suggest, we talk about cups of tea and not cup of teas. It's hard to know what today refers to, whether a day, a year or merely the modern era. Whatever the case, 800-billion is a vast number of cups of tea that would require much of the earth's population to spend much of its time drinking tea. And, as Kate ...


2

No, they do not mean or imply the same thing. It is a sporting reference often used as an analogy. Professional sports tournaments are normally organised into leagues, pitting similarly performing teams against one another. When a team reaches the very top of a league, they may be promoted to the next league up; likewise, when they hit the bottom, they may ...


1

"I rushed to the class, and when I arrived I found that nobody was there." sounds more natural. I would only use "was rushing" if something happened while you were rushing.


1

It looks like you want to treat "they" as the subject of the infinitive phrase "not to recognize you". Under a traditional analysis, infinitives do not have subjects -- ever. The traditional parts of the sentence are these: Subject: I Verb: want Direct Object: them Object Complement: not to recognize you Verbs that take both direct objects and ...


1

I think you may be having trouble with with past perfect continuous tense because you are thinking too logically about it, or want it to say too much. Your answer to "Which is the particular time in the past which stops her from giving lectures?" is correct in this case, but it is not necessary to state such a time, or even for there to be such a time, to ...


1

You should understand that quite a large percentage of the American public cannot write well. Writing well is far more difficult than conversing well because, in conversation, tone of voice, emphasis, hand gestures, and opportunities for questions facilitate mutual understanding. Obviously, the sentence as written is nonsense: a complaining customer is ...


1

“Keeping the complaining customer satisfied” refers to a process whereby things are continually done, or effort is made in some way, to make sure the customer is satisfied. To me the statement sounds a bit odd, as the customer is already said to be dissatisfied (complaining), though they are likely referring to customers who are prone to complaining, and it’...


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