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7 votes
Accepted

Is “That store sells watches for one dollar each” grammatically correct? Are there better alternatives to this sentence, such as with “at”?

Yes, "for" is completely fine. I wonder where you heard this rule, because I can't think of any cases where it holds. You can buy, sell, distribute, purchase, or do any other commerce-...
the-baby-is-you's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Correct grammar with "For what kind" questions

The most correct usage would be: For what kind of applications may its use not be appropriate? But since you are asking for a correct answer from a list I'm guessing this is for a test. The second; ...
Elliot's user avatar
  • 315
4 votes

Is “That store sells watches for one dollar each” grammatically correct? Are there better alternatives to this sentence, such as with “at”?

For is the way that it would most likely be expressed. How much did you pay for that? How much do you want for that? I got it for a song [very little money]. They sold their house for nearly $700,000....
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
3 votes

Is "ones" in this sentence grammatical?

In the sentence you mentioned, "ones" should actually be "one's." The correct version is: "In the individual, this cultural context is expressed in terms of one's attitudes, ...
talha2k's user avatar
  • 399
3 votes

as having over / for having over – are both correct? Do the sentences mean the same?

To me, the likely meanings / contexts are different... 1: The article was flagged as [being X] ... implies flagging = labeling in the context of a classification exercise. Every article is assigned ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

When should I use "the" and when don't I need to use it?

Most readers of such formal, technical prose would expect “the code subspace C ” to imply that there exists exactly one code subspace under discussion and that its name is C. By contrast, without the ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes

as having over / for having over – are both correct? Do the sentences mean the same?

I would say that (1) is more idiomatic. You flag something (mark it for attention) as having (because it has) a certain quality. You flag something for a particular person's attention rather than for ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 56.2k

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