6

Most of your interpretations are correct, but... Dr. Fox had described Elizabeth as having 'an intellect of quite a high order' - that is, as being fairly intelligent. At the time she had wept from disappointment because he had not felt able to say that she was very intelligent (had an intellect of a high order). Now, she thinks it probably was meant as a ...


2

“quite” can be tricky. In BrE (which we’d assume for an Australian author), it usually means “fairly”. So, when his letter of reference for her first job interview described her as “quite” intelligent, she assumed it was an insult (see damning with faint praise), so she wept. However, “quite” can also mean “very” (the norm in AmE), so now she believes it was ...


2

The phrases are not wrong, but I would simply say "there is no hurry". Note that any such statement risks the developers giving the report their lowest priority. The phrase "at your convenience" has been used in military fiction where a senior ranked person orders a lower ranked person to do something, but it is not needed immediately. ...


2

Honestly, i think there's a better version of both sentences: "I suggest that you point to what A should return and tell the user to match it with the output of B in README." Here are my reasons: 1- when you're pointing to the content, you should use tell instead of say based on the British Dictionary 2- "you" after suggest in this ...


2

I would expect simply "Contact us by 1 June 2021 to get a 3-month free trial." There is no need to say that an offer is involved, the sentence itself is the offer.


1

It's not idiomatic to say remember about in this context. If this is an imperative, the way to phrase it is Remember to... For example, Remember to plant your peanuts on land suitable for them. Remember about is more often used when we discuss recollecting facts about an event or an object. what do you remember about Stalin's death? I don't remember ...


1

They're grammatical but they carry a wide range of meanings. "when was he a teacher?" =when (in the past) did he teach as a profession? "when wasn't he a teacher?" Implies that during his entire life, he tried to teach things to people- a calling rather than a profession "when is he a teacher?" NOt a common usage, or smooth. If ...


1

the sentence "Doctor Fox would have got on the plane with the paper serviette still sprouting from his collar" hasn't got if clause, can it be the imagination of Elizabeth and can we write it like this: If he was left to himself He would have got on the plane with the paper serviette still sprouting from his collar? This depends on whether ...


1

Both of the above sentences are alike. They have the same meaning and they mean the same thing.


1

Q. Which preposition precedes the noun "schooling" Is it 1.medium of instruction at schooling or 2.medium of instruction in schooling. A. OF the medium of instruction of schooling Ref Wikipedia If the first language of students is different from the official language, it may be used as the medium of instruction for part or all of schooling. We ...


1

1: Who also sent documents by post? ...isn't a particularly likely utterance, but it would [almost] always be interpreted as requesting a list of people who posted their documents as well as doing something else (filling in the same information to an online survey, for example). 2: Who else sent documents by post? ...would [definitely] always be ...


1

After searching the corpus (millions of English texts), "considered as" (3,000) is significantly less used when compared to just "considered" (108,000). 3,000 uses is not insignificant, so it is difficult to say that it is necessarily "incorrect". I found some theoretical grammar difference, but it is largely not observed and ...


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