2

Sorry, no, your original sentence is not idiomatic. You're taking slang from video games and trying to use it in another context. Sometimes using terminology from another context like this helps people to understood because it creates a useful analogy, or is clever and makes an amusing metaphor. But in this case, I don't think it accomplishes either of those ...


2

After the verb "to help" comes infinitive: (He helps me do this) You can also use the preposition (to): (He helps me to do this) Your first sentence is the correct one


2

If you mean this https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/48707712 it's a page title, which is similar to a newspaper headline and is not required to be a grammatical sentence. Country names are often combined with other nouns; in the above it indicates that England and Romania are the national teams of those countries. England knocked out by America means ...


2

Jack is correct, but this builds on Jack's answer. The sentence in question was reported in a Reuters article. My read of the context is this: Softbank is an investment bank. So, it owns various assets, like its infamous stake in WeWork. The short version is that WeWork is in some financial distress due to management. The long version is truly a sordid ...


2

I read the article that quote came from, and I think the structure of the sentence isn't quite correct. "Son" is the CEO of the company Softbank. He was previously reluctant to sell assets to raise cash and reduce debt. "Boodry" is an analyst working for a company that watches Softbank. He has said that Softbank's "conglomerate discount" has increased, and ...


1

The first sentence sounds more natural to me (at least in American English). However, if I were speaking, I would probably say, "He always knows how to treat the people he could benefit from VERY well" (with emphasis on "very"). That's because "treat" is a long way from "well". By the time you get to "well" you might need some help to re-direct the listener ...


1

While using “being” before "used" is more grammatically correct in English, most people tend to not use it in casual conversation and writing.


1

The first one is correct. The ‘though’ is necessary if you want to show that they did it despite the fact that it put them in harm’s way; that they were being selfless. Additionally, you need a conjunction between the two clauses Medical workers exhibited their dedication to saving lives and this meant they had to put themselves in harm's way. ...


1

This Beach’s beauty: SUBJECT is: AUXILIARY VERB


1

This is not grammatically correct. In its current form, you have three (plural) nouns right next to each other with nothing connecting them, which is pretty much never right. You need to start with one noun which indicates the actual (single) thing you are talking about, and then you can modify it with additional adjectives or possessive forms, etc. from ...


1

we use "come along" to refer to the progress or state of something, as in "how's the project coming along" (how much progress have you made on the movie?/ what state or phrase is the project in?) so as you can see we need a noun in a question like that (like project, baby, etc) we can make the noun out of a gerund (isolating) or using a suffix (isolation) ...


1

Knowledge is uncountable, and so does not normally take either an indefinite article, or a plural ending. Like other uncountables, it can sometimes be used as countable, when it refers to a specific instance or a particular type (I mention this for completeness: it's not relevant in your example) Means (in this sense) is singular, despite its -s ending. It ...


1

You can't "add to be verbs before verbs". You can form sentences that are [Subject] [be] [adjective]. And you can form sentences in the passive voice [Subject] [be] [past participle] ([by phrase]). However this is Irrelevant to the question. The word "Let's" is a contraction of "Let us" The word "let" is a verb (in the imperative form) and it is ...


1

This sentence is potentially a bit confusing when first reading it. It's combining a couple of different colloquialisms with some potentially ambiguous prepositions. The rest of the passage does help to clarify what is meant, but as a native English speaker even I had to re-read the first sentence when I first encountered it. It should be parsed as ...


1

"This closed-gap solution" isn't an idiomatic expression. I suggest "interim solution", or "stopgap solution, or "temporary solution". While "gap" sort of works, the word "interval", might fit better. As AIQ said, you need to use 'between' with 'and', and not with 'to'.


1

From what I understand, you are trying to explain (or define) your project to someone in the most simplest way possible. Your sentence, although grammatical, is not idiomatic and does not serve your purpose. First, the use of "nutshell" in that manner is quite unusual, if not incorrect. Second, if we assume "nutshell" can be used like that, then the use of ...


1

Level up is a phrase derived from video games and is appropriate to use when talking about things you do in a video game or possibly if you're trying to use video-game terms to relate to others. Outside of those contexts it will sound awkward.


1

No, it's not idiomatic. The way you expressed it in your explanation is much better.


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