24

Yes, I let him sleep is correct while I let him to sleep is incorrect. Certain verbs take a bare infinitive, and "let" is one of them. Here's a link that discusses the issue more.


17

It is incorrect simply because the idiom is "Let someone [bare infinitive]". In some situations, a "to-infinitive" is used, and in other the bare infinitive is correct. This is one of those times when only the bare infinitive is used. Compare with the same structure "I made him sleep" or "I helped him sleep" (though in the last one the "to infinitive is ...


4

It's not necessarily grammatically wrong, but the order you've presented is not idiomatic and would strike my ear as possibly archaic. The idiomatic version places the subject between the verb and the negation. Aren't they lovely? becomes Are they not lovely? See a famous version of this from the movie Gladiator: Are you not entertained? Is this ...


3

Both these sentences are well-formed grammatically, but they are not used for the same thing: He wasn't thinking straight.FEATURES: past tense, continuous aspect He hadn't been thinking straight.FEATURES: past tense, perfective aspect, continuous aspect Both sentences’ verbs are in the past tense (was, had), and both sentences are also marked with the ...


2

Regardless of whether we think of data as singular or plural, the word response in OP's example is an (adjectival) noun adjunct / attributive noun usage. Attributive nouns are usually singular, as in He bought a car radio, but in certain contexts, such as They met in a singles bar, the plural form has become idiomatically established. Things get more ...


1

I find it helpful to think of constructions like "to [verb]" as if they were nouns. In this case "to sleep" behaves much like a noun. It could be the subject of a sentence: "To sleep is wonderful." It's very similar to "sleeping" which also acts as a noun e.g. "I like [sweets / the cat / sleeping]" "I let him [noun]" just wouldn't be right, because you need ...


1

No. When you use "does", "did" then verb is not to be changed to past or past participle. The computer does not receive its updates


1

You need to think about what the teacher means by "we". From the perspective of the teacher, "we" means "I and you and the other students". When you report this, you change perspective, "I" becomes "Her", "you" becomes "I" and "the other students" is still "the other students". So the teacher's "we" will become our "Her and I and the other students"....


1

"Wasn't interrupted" is the preterit tense. Its usage here is improper. Since what you're saying is a hypothetical situation that no longer exists as even its condition is in the past (i.e., "would have been"), the pluperfect subjunctive is required. Therefore, the proper way to write that would be: "If this day hadn't been interrupted by a sudden ...


1

Yes, Do you know some writers? could be used in that way, and is not ungrammatical. It is slightly ambiguous, in that "some" can be taken in any of several ways, and this sentence does not particularly indicate any of them more than any other. It could mean "more than one" for example.


1

This answer takes into account the actual use case of collating results and preparing statistics of those results, not solely the English usage. There is some implied information here. You are collecting results (from observations) and from the results you are making statistics to understand those observations. If that statement is true, then the ...


1

the term is response data. The data received as responses to a survey, for example. The data from the response is written as: response data. This is a common phenomenon in English. Results of the tests becomes: test results. These are not formal compound nouns. They are noun phrases using two nouns in order to shorten text. 1) View Survey Data When ...


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