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13 votes

I would like to submit an opinion letter arguing that my sentence should also be considered correct

Sorry, your sentence isn't grammatically valid. It's not even a sentence! The original was quite complex, so let's demonstrate with something simpler. This light and this switch show whether the ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 15.7k
3 votes

I would like to submit an opinion letter arguing that my sentence should also be considered correct

Unfortunately, you're almost certainly wrong. "Whether" is an interrogative subordinator/complementiser that introduces a clause. I.e., [whether + noun + verb phrase]. This is the ...
ishtar's user avatar
  • 664
1 vote
Accepted

Frequent vs often, before vs after

As noted in the comments, you're comparing the adjective frequent with the adverb often, which is why the word order is different and you feel the tension of swapping them. One way to help understand ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
1 vote

Which sentence is the correct one?

It depends how the sentence is used. If one is recording, i.e., quoting, colloquial conversation, either might be heard. In formal English, as mentioned in other comments, neither is acceptable. Two ...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

"He neither texted me nor did he call me". "He neither texted me nor called me". "He neither texted me nor he called me"

Stylistically speaking, since the neither occurs immediately after the sentence’s subject, it is in the position where one (prototypically) expects to find a verb phrase. For that reason, each of the ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote

Why does spell & grammar check flag 'himself' as incorrect in this sentence?

This is a complex sentence with a subjectless content clause being the subject of the main clause. The referent of the reflexive has to be deduced from the meaning of the sentence. Is there any ...
ishtar's user avatar
  • 664
1 vote
Accepted

Can the past subjunctive express things other than counter-factuals?

Yes, that is a natural sentence. I think there is an implied conditional "If that director saw this kind of movie, they would hate it". Alternatively, it might be an epistemic reading of the ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 76.3k
1 vote

Can we use "unless "with a Verb in negative form in the same clause?

Yes, it would be wrong. You cannot use unless with a negative verb, because the word itself implies a negative. 'You cannot use unless to talk about a situation that results from something not ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 57.5k
1 vote

Whats the apropriate way to express this?

The first is more correct. The second contains several spelling and grammatical errors. The most important is that "do" is wrong. "My English isn't native level, I make mistakes that ...
Pete's user avatar
  • 186
1 vote

I would like to submit an opinion letter arguing that my sentence should also be considered correct

I think you may have misunderstood the meaning of the sentence. Hence, the performer’s level of skill and the complexity of the skill itself will determine whether an audience helps or hinders ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
1 vote

Do you find these sentences grammatical (concerning the verb "expect" and its complements)?

And yet what they expect is students of the language to buy their book. That (clumsy) sentence would fly in most AmE conversations. With for, compare: this and this
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
1 vote

When to use “tomato” and when to use “toma­toes”?

Tomato or tomatoes is irrelevant. Tomatoes are fruits. Your statement, as written, refers to the fruit - not the plant. If you want to refer to the plant or plants then say it: "... as­so­ci­ated ...
ArtK's user avatar
  • 11

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