4

It is not idiomatic English - unless you are talking about cooked apple as a substance. What kinds of pie filling do you like? Apple is good, but I like cherry best. When speaking about the natural, uncooked fruit, we would always say Apples/cherries/oranges are good.


3

Native speakers learn language during childhood, and it has been recognized that the brain is especially receptive to language at this time. Consider the complex grammar of Russian and German. Or Polish, they have seven cases: nominative (mianownik), genitive (dopełniacz), dative (celownik), accusative (biernik), instrumental (narzędnik), locative (...


3

Could can either have a past meaning (=was able to) or a conditional meaning (=would be able to). For example, in the sentence "When I was younger I could run five miles", "could" means "was able to" and serves as the past tense of "can". As you know, in the Second Conditional, the simple past is used in the condition ...


2

These would all be correct: There are only five slices of bread left in the kitchen for your breakfast. There are only five loaves of bread left in the kitchen for your breakfast. There are only five rolls left in the kitchen for your breakfast. There are only five buns left in the kitchen for your breakfast. "Bread" is not a noun that can be ...


2

"Wants...that..." is a rare, possibly dialectal usage that would sound wrong to a lot of a native speakers. The Oxford English Dictionary has a number of examples of the type "She wants (that) she should be respected" (both with and without "that"). Note that all but one of the OED's examples use the modal "should". (...


2

(1) The following "red" styles are prohibited, but are sometimes applied by LibreOffice Writer automatically. (2) The following "red" styles are prohibited, but they are applied sometimes by LibreOffice Writer automatically. They are both grammatical. It is just a matter of personal preference. Some people prefer (1) over (2) because it ...


2

Honestly, i think there's a better version of both sentences: "I suggest that you point to what A should return and tell the user to match it with the output of B in README." Here are my reasons: 1- when you're pointing to the content, you should use tell instead of say based on the British Dictionary 2- "you" after suggest in this ...


2

I would expect simply "Contact us by 1 June 2021 to get a 3-month free trial." There is no need to say that an offer is involved, the sentence itself is the offer.


2

You wanted your son to see this. That's why you did it to boast about your career and how prominent you were. The above is grammatical. Its 1st objective is to have your son see this; its 2nd, to boast about your career and how prominent you were. That's why suggests that the 1st objective is the main one. This example has a slight different meaning from ...


1

In the UK, a person who makes an application for state benefits is called a 'claimant', because they are 'claiming' what they believe they are entitled to. Your text is saying that the claimants (people who already receive state unemployment benefits) are being paid supplemental unemployment payments as well. There is nothing omitted from the grammar - if ...


1

The first construction is correct. Although the grammar is OK. The sentences are a little confusing. I can't figure out what "it" is is you did. Perhaps you were willing to accept some reward for your son's sake even though you had other reasons not to.


1

It's not idiomatic to say remember about in this context. If this is an imperative, the way to phrase it is Remember to... For example, Remember to plant your peanuts on land suitable for them. Remember about is more often used when we discuss recollecting facts about an event or an object. what do you remember about Stalin's death? I don't remember ...


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