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In standard English usage, the verb say can have as its object either a literal utterance, a noun phrase, or a subordinate clause. But even in the last two cases, the object must refer to at least a figurative utterance. Four examples: 1. He glanced up and said, "No thank you." [an utterance] 2. She lowered her head and said grace. [a noun ...


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All of those are acceptable. There are subtleties about when you would use each though. These are not comprehensive or absolute, but below are examples of how each might be used. I will give you some water. If you have some water in your possession. I will get you some water. If you need to leave the person to retrieve some water. I will ...


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Here it's important to note that chosen can refer both to a state, like being happy. Or it can refer to the prior action of being chosen. "How many of you are being chosen?" Refers to a future action, so you talking to a group that hasn't yet been chosen, but want to know how many expect to be chosen. "How many of you are chosen?" Refers to a current state....


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Differentiate and distinguish share one synonymous meaning, but each word has other meanings that aren't synonymous. For example, it's possible to use differentiate intransitively (example from Google) without a between structure: the receptors are developed and differentiated into sense organs but you can't substitute distinguish here. Also, using ...


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I would say it's perhaps slightly incorrect for the context, as you haven't actually stated that you want John to have a say, you've just asked if he does have a say. Your phrasing might also be heard in a context where some plan is going to go ahead, but someone feels that John really ought to have a say before proceeding. In that context, it would be ...


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None of those expressions is idiomatic English. I want someone doesn't do something would have to be "I don't want someone to do something" If you were requesting another person to pass on the message, you could say "I ask you to ask him not to do it."


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I don't think any of them are correct. They are certainly all very awkward. The contraction let's means "let us." So the first one should be "Let's do that." Meaning "Let us do that." Or possibly you mean to say "Let us agree that I will do that." It is not clear what you intend. The second one confuses me. I think you want to say "Let us agree that ...


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Both of your sentences my friend are grammatically correct. In your first sentence, the word 'read' functioned as a noun. Hence, the adjective 'interesting' described it. In your second sentence, the word 'read' functions as a verb. Thus, it is in future tense implying that you might find the book interesting if you would read it.


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The word you emphasize indicates the opposition you have met or expect to meet: I will say it is better. [since you claim it's someone else who says it's better] I will say it is better. [since you claim I won't say it is better] I will say it is better. I will say it is better. [since you claim it's actually worse]


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They are two different questions. What is your life like in two words? Here you are being asked to describe your life, its qualities, your subjective experience of it, etc. Given that you're being asked to do it in two words, the questioner is likely expecting some kind of snappy, creative, answer, almost like a headline. What is your life in two ...


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passed / past If you are referring to a distance or a period of time before now, use “past”: “the police car drove past the suspect’s house” (distance) or “the team performed well in the past” (time). If you are describing the action of passing, however, you need to use “passed”: “when John passed the gravy, he spilled it on his lap,” “the teacher was ...


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The common news idiom “footage surfaces” means that video has come to public attention, usually online through social media. For example, somebody can record video of a newsworthy event like an attack or a demonstration. They might then take days to upload it to social media (eg: YouTube) and then it can take weeks to come to the attention of news outlets. ...


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Increase is not a countable noun, so you can't say how many increase. "How many of the increased number of jobs go to Americans?" (How many refers to jobs)


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Neither are correct. You need to use: What increase in the number of jobs goes to America? Or (depending on your context/meaning); What increase in the number of jobs is attributable to America? “An increase“ is a single concept, with a particular value, and you cannot refer to “many increase” as if it was a plural. Notice that the question focuses ...


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You can't use the first one. It means How many pieces of timber (each one metre long) do you need to build a cabin? However it is an un-idiomatic way of asking that question. The correct way is How long do you need the timber to be? Now, unless you are a very strange person, you don't just walk up to someone and ask this question. So let's imagine ...


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Do you interest something? is a perfectly grammatical sentence. It often doesn't make much sense, but that's simply because of the meaning of the verb interest. interest transitive verb 1 : to engage the attention or arouse the interest of 2 : to induce or persuade to participate or engage https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/interest ...


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Tom died 15 years ago. He has 3 sons. Even though Tom has passed on, Tom still exists in this sentence and in at least the memories of his sons. Use of has is appropriate. Tom died 15 years ago. He had 3 sons. This sounds like his 3 sons are no longer alive or so distant that their status is unknown (i.e. you haven't seen the sons in 15 years and don't ...


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Yes, most definitely it is grammatically incorrect.


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I don't think so. I actually don't know what you intend by it (which is an indication that it is not idiomatic in English). This use of as ... so ... (which is rather literary) is for drawing a parallel between two different things. Without the so, it is a normal English construction, with a sense of "since" or "because": As she went to McDonald's ...


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<tl;dr> It's something else, namely a contributor to Wikipedia writing himself into a corner and then trying to use a punctuation mark to free himself. The basic confusion is the writer's. The participial clause is a nominative absolute. Nominative for any subject of the participle that might be present, and absolute meaning independent of the ...


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The basic unit of English grammar is the clause. Generally, speaking a clause has a subject (roughly the person or thing that the clause is about) and a predicate. The predicate contains the verb (roughly the words telling us about the state of or the action taken by or applied to the subject). The predicate also contains complements, those elements needed ...


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The possible answers are: A: I want to buy all books, two for my brother and the other for me. B: I want to buy both books, two for my brother and the other for me. C: I want to buy three books, two for my brother and the other for me. You are correct that with A it should be "all the books", not just "all books". Although you could say "the ...


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You've kind of answered your own question - answer 'A' doesn't fit without changing the question. If you have to change the question to make your answer correct, then your answer is wrong. "The other" can only refer to one book, because of the definite article and the singular "other". So if there are two books for your brother plus one for you, that makes ...


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"There is a school near my home" = common noun. "He is a teacher at Newtown School" = proper noun (not because both speakers know the school, but because it is the school's official name). School in a different sense (a school of porpoises) is a collective noun.


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The rules governing English articles are convoluted, but generally speaking, the definite article the modifies a noun to distinguish a particular member of the set of things covered by the noun's definition. When a name uniquely identifies a person, the name already distinguishes the member in question, making the article superfluous. So you would say ...


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For all "standard" varieties of English, only before he came is valid. But you will sometimes hear come in similar "Past Tense" contexts in the UK... 1: We were in the pub last night when this guy come over and picked a fight with us It's worth noting that although the first highlighted verb there looks like an "Unmarked Infinitive" (the non-inflected "...


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I think you'd likely hear this kind of thing: For all safety questions, please go to John. For all safety-related questions, please go to John. For all questions on safety, please go to John. I'm struggling to make sense of the first part of your question. For that specific context, the person who was questioned might just answer something like:...


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About part number one of your question: I've just searched for sentences like these in literature and found no one with "come" but with "came" found some examples: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sense_and_Sensibility : "Did you see them off, before you came away?" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maia_(novel) : "Did you know Occula before you came to ...


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In the context of buying/selling things, I believe "outlet products" here is referring to "products which are sold in an outlet store"


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First implies that it is literally the first question that you ask them. At first could mean that you ask it quite early in the conversation, or soon after having met them.


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