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1 vote

Does using "there" a second time matter?

It is still grammatically correct with or without "there". "there" just points out that the doctor is in the hospital, so it makes it more specific to where the doctor is, nothing ...
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2 votes

What is the difference between the prepositions 'up' and 'onto', both indicating 'motion'?

Up shows direction of motion. You can go up the hill from anywhere on it, even from the very bottom. Onto shows motion to a place that is on top of something. The motion itself does not need to be ...
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1 vote

What is the difference between up and upon?

I wonder where you found that definition. It's misleading, I think. As Lexico says, The preposition upon has the same core meaning as the preposition on. However, in modern English upon tends to be ...
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1 vote
Accepted

What is the difference between up and upon?

I don't find We went upon the hill particularly idiomatic. Upon usually describes a position rather than movement. It's far more natural to say We went up the hill but you can say We stood upon the ...
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2 votes

What is the difference between the prepositions ‘upon‘ & ‘onto‘?

"The cat jumped upon the table" introduces a potential ambiguity. It could be understood as "The cat did jumps which started and finished on the table." Now pragmatically that is ...
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3 votes

In the sentence "What are the benefits of earning money?" what part of speech is the word "earning"?

As another answer notes, "earning" is a gerund. If you look up its headword form ("earn") in a dictionary, the part of speech is verb. In your sentence, it functions as the object ...
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0 votes

past tense/present tense... which one is best in this context?

Earlier this morning, I opened the list on my computer to check: A. ...if there was anyone I knew who had made the list. B. ...if there was anyone I know who had made the list. C. ...if ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Preposition help required: which sentence is correct?

What would be grammatically correct and highly idiomatic is Nadeem has been living with his family in Murree for ten years Notice "years" rather than "year." What would also be ...
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0 votes

Why is "sally is a sandwich" grammatical?

There’s a famous book by Oliver Sacks: “The man who believed his wife was a hat”. The author is a psychologist who has treated many extreme cases of psychosis. And yes, the man in question did indeed ...
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0 votes

Why is "sally is a sandwich" grammatical?

When we interpret a sentence, we do so in terms of the meanings of the word in order to understand the sentence as a whole. So why don't we parse this as "The president thought: that sally is a ...
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0 votes

Why is "sally is a sandwich" grammatical?

To add to what James K is saying, this particular sentence is ungrammatical; it should actually be: The president thought Sally was a sandwich. Alternatively, The president thinks Sally is a ...
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1 vote

Why is "sally is a sandwich" grammatical?

I do not view punctuation and capitalization as technically part of grammar because they do not even exist in the spoken language. They are conventions of formal writing specified in style guides. ...
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3 votes

Why is "sally is a sandwich" grammatical?

Sally is a sandwich. Correct grammar. Subject "Sally", verb "is", complement "a sandwich". Sally is a name and must have a capital letter. The president is a tool. ...
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0 votes

Instruction Meeting or Introductory Meeting?

An instruction meeting usually refers to a meeting where one gives instructions and delegates the work to others, while an introductory meeting is where one gives an "introduction" on a ...
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1 vote

Go up/come down: Do both phrases imply the same thing on a fundamental level in the given context?

If we say a number 'comes down' to a value, we mean that it is reduced from some previous higher value. If we say a number 'goes up' to a value, we mean that is increased from some previous lower ...
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2 votes

Carry the luggage for me, _________? A. Will you B. Won't you

Well, either is grammatically correct, but they have different meanings. So, "Carry the luggage for me, won't you?" implies the opposite: you should carry the luggage. It is therefore a ...
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0 votes

Aren’t they vs don’t they

Present simple: for general statements, auxiliary verb do/does Crimes only happen in favelas. Declarative Crimes don't happen only in favelas. Negative Don't crimes only happen in favelas? Negative ...
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0 votes

Aren’t they vs don’t they

The difference is the same as between: Crimes (do) happen. Crimes are happening. The difference is that the former is in the indefinite present tense which implies the crimes happen periodically, on ...
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0 votes
Accepted

Can ‘attribute A to B’ be used as ‘attribute to B A?’

It must be possible to attribute to the individual an intention to actually do something to advance a goal. is a perfectly valid sentence, grammatically speaking. Perhaps it could be rephrased to low ...
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0 votes

Is there a typo in this sentence?

Firstly, the colon right after "certain rights to found families" does not make any sense as the items mentioned after are distinctly separate and not a part of the right to found families. ...
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4 votes
Accepted

Is there a typo in this sentence?

"[L]ife inside the state until the eighteenth century sharply distinguished between a formally unfree population (slaves, serfs, and dependents), on the one hand, and a large smallholder ...
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2 votes

Is there a typo in this sentence?

It is hard to tell. There are four readings, all make some sense. (No typo) The smallholders got rid of these rights (in exchange for something else, (sense 1) (No typo) The smallholders "put ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Is the following sentence grammatically correct and in a correct form?

When dinner time is not correct in standard English (at least AmE or BrE), it should be something like "at dinner time" or "when it is dinner time. we always go through the fact that ...
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0 votes

Is it OK to say "Ask the question to your partner"?

You cannot ask something to someone. It's not correct English. You can ask something of someone but then it would probably be a request not a question. Can I ask a favour of you? (Oxford Dictionary) ...
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0 votes

Is it OK to say "Ask the question to your partner"?

You cannot say Ask the question to your partner It can be the below though Pose a question to your partner The below can be used Ask the question of your partner Another viable option is Ask a ...
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0 votes

Has/ have verb third form today or did the second form today

She has done it today. That is okay if the day is not finished. She did it yesterday. That is correct. Yesterday is finished. We don't use present prefect with specific times likes yesterday, two ...
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0 votes

Has/ have verb third form today or did the second form today

Typically we use the past tense when we add the time or date that we did/heard/observed something. I visited the library yesterday. I saw his plane depart last week. But we often make an exception to ...
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