53

You are absolutely correct. "How do you do" is an old fashioned introduction and is an obsolete synonym of "hello", and consequently the proper response is "how do you do?". Mr Darlington: How do you do, Mrs Windermere? Mrs Windermere: How do you do, Mr Darlington? This exchange is exactly equivalent to the more modern (and at the time, more vulgar):...


42

Ho is pretty much unused in normal speech as a greeting. The two uses you listed are pretty much the only uses I have ever heard. Both are also somewhat archaic and traditional phrases. "ho, ho, ho" is exclusively what is used to describe Santa Claus's laughter. (Or maybe the Green Giant) "[Land] Ho! Ahoy mateys" is exclusively what cartoon pirates say. ...


34

"Ho" isn't used in ordinary conversational English, except as a dialect variant of "whore", and in specific situations, such as Santa's "Ho, ho, ho!" (which I've always interpreted as just being a deeper-voiced version of "Hahaha"). Responding to "Hi!" with "Ho!" isn't a normal thing to do. Just say "Hi", "Hey", "Hello" or whatever other greeting you prefer. ...


31

"Ho" is archaic. It has fallen out of standard use, but is found in older literature and references. It is still used by those who strive to keep old words alive. (Pirate and medieval recreation performers, notably.) According to Merriam-Webster, it is an interjection which is from Middle English. The 'Modern English' equivalent would be "hey". ...


27

Both "dude" and "man" are INFORMAL. Whether or not they are disrespectful depends on whether you are expected to have a formal or informal relationship with the person you are addressing. If you have a familiar relationship already, calling them either term reinforces that familiarity. If I say to my friend "Check this out, man!" the subtext of the ...


22

No. Firstly, "thou"/"thee" is not modern English outside of dialectal usages (which I believe is its context in Uncle Tom's Cabin). Secondly, you're right about the parallels to the two pronouns in Spanish, but "you" is the polite, formal option. Actually, Spanish is a bit more complicated, because it has (I understand) familiar and formal versions for ...


22

I agree with you: "Dear Bob" followed by "Hi, Bob" is redundant. Avoid that as best you can. The best way to start a letter or email really depends on how close you are to the recipient. For instance, if I worked at Microsoft and was emailing the CEO of Apple, I would begin with "Dear Mr. Cook" or simply "Mr. Cook". If I was emailing my own boss, I might ...


20

How do you do? is a bit formal sounding; at least here in the U.S., we'd usually use the more informal How are you? instead. How are you? (or, even more informally, How ya' doin'?) is indeed used as a greeting as often as it is as a genuine inquiry, although there are, of course, some exceptions. If I had been in an accident, for example, and was paid a ...


19

"Dear Bob" is just letter-writing language for "Hi, Bob" so including both of them is redundant. If you're writing a formal letter, saying "Dear Bob" has already said hello, so you don't need to do it again. If you're writing informally, you might prefer to write "Hi, Bob!" instead of "Dear Bob".


15

It's totally fine as long as you're mindful of who you're saying it to, however that might be more of an issue of tone than it is of offending people for using gendered speech. To break it down, you would be totally fine saying something like "are you guys coming?" to a group of guys, to a group of guys and girls, or even a group of girls. If it's just a ...


13

In my region (Upstate NY, American English) it is a little different. We do answer the question, although the answer can vary. The customary greeting is "How are you?" The response: If I wish to be polite and brief, I will say "I am well. How are you?" ("well", "doing good", "very well" all interchangeable here. "Well" is more formal than "good". "I'...


12

There could be many ways and it depends on the speaker. However, I always reply this way Thank you. Same here. Or Thank you. Nice talking to you as well This conveys that your are thankful to the person. And you too feel the same.


10

It sounds as though you're not confused about the actual meaning of the question, but about whether the empathy it implies is sincere. Most customer-facing establishments, like coffee shops, instruct their employees to welcome customers with a friendly greeting, instead of "what do you want?", which is what they really want to know. Whether or not they ...


9

It's called the vocative comma. When you address your listener or reader by name or by a description, written English grammar requires that you set off the noun or noun phrase by which you name your audience with commas. It appears in your example sentence because the speaker is directly addressing his friends. For example, this sentence does not directly ...


8

If you are sending a thank-you card, then it is perfectly OK to be informal and you can say pretty much whatever you like so long as it is polite. If you know the person only by their surname, then maybe you should be a little more formal. Start with "Dear Mr. Jones," and end with "Yours sincerely, your name".


8

"Ho" as a word is a corruption from the French "haut" meaning "up". Related phrases include "Tally-ho!" ("taille haut!", or "Swords up!") or "What ho" ("What's up?") - although both are considered simultaneously archaic and posh affectations - and the nautical "Land ho" (for when land is sighted coming up over the horizon, as an alternative to "Land ahoy" - ...


7

The first one looks like a team hand stack (warning: black hole ahem, sorry, TV Tropes link). It usually involves more than two people, though. (Perhaps that gets hard to photograph?) The second is an arm wrestling handshake, since that is the usual position of the hands when arm wrestling. The third looks like both people are doing a double-hander - see ...


6

All of those phrases are idiomatic meaning Goodbye with different levels of informality. There is normally no additional implied meaning behind these phrases. Here is a list of common idiomatic phrases meaning goodbye grouped by rough formality. (Note that "level of formality" is difficult to measure in any meaningful way - and varies from group to group, ...


6

Howdy is a contraction of "howdy do", which is itself a (primarily south US) contraction of "how do you do", which is a synonym for hello. For this reason, any standard response to "hello" is a valid response to "howdy": hello howdy hi how are you? What's up? how you doin'? (esp. NY) "Howdy howdy" is a jovial form of "howdy", ...


6

It would be a perfectly normal introductory exchange in formal situations in the UK.


6

This is an area of English where it's difficult to give a definitive answer - the situation has been changing over time, and the answer will vary a little in different regions and contexts. Some points: Historically, 'Miss' would have been the correct answer - it was not merely for young girls, but for any unmarried female. Since the advent of modern ...


5

Is this social etiquette the same in America and American people say "Good morning" to their roommate everyday? It depends. Some people aren't morning people at all. They usually don't care for good mornings because it makes them upset that they are awake and still not sleeping. However, as long as the roommates aren't totally awkward with each other, I'...


5

In Britain, the expression good job when used by a superior to a junior is considered patronizing. It is not used as a compliment. I wouldn't use it at all except as a joke, if you knew the person you were speaking to would understand the joke. A simple well done or nice one is much more acceptable and can be used between people of any position. In the ...


5

I will also say that in an informal setting among friends, "dude!" with a certain tone is used to express surprise or dismay at something that a man has done/said. I'll give two examples. Person 1: "I found out today that I got the job." Person 2: "Dude! That is so awesome." Person 1: drunk and knocks over a glass during a party and is becoming a bit ...


5

This is more a question of etiquette and personal style than language. It's polite to acknowledge the greeting somehow. A simple "Hello" is sufficient. If you do wish to engage in conversation, then add a question or a bit of small talk. Examples: Hello, how are you? Good morning. Lovely day, isn't it? Hi, Bob, how's the wife and kids?


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