86

Its English equivalent is ‘he can dish it out, but he can't take it’ defined by Cambridge English Dictionary as: someone easily criticizes other people but does not like it when other people criticize him or her


86

If it ain't broke, don't fix it. (informal) If it isn't broken, don't try to fix it. Edit: You could leave out "try to" (I've heard it both ways), but the point of the proverb is that if you try to fix something that isn't broken, you won't be successful.


60

The expression is not even that dated, e.g. here's a movie from 2020 with exact this title, and there's another one from 2012. In neither case is the title supposed to be a sentence addressed to a male kid. Note that you can also say "Oh, brother" (quote from Daria) even if you don't have one: Daria - (rolls eyes) Oh, brother. Jake - He calls ...


40

In English, we have diamond cut diamond, although I think fight fire with fire is more appropriate in the situation described in the OP. Fight fire with fire: to use the same methods as someone else in order to defeat them. [Cambridge English Dictionary]


37

You can, the "boy" in the phrase is not addressed to the person you are speaking to. (It probably started as a minced oath with "boy" replacing the blasphemous "Jesus" or "God") There is a well known song by Buddy Holly with lyrics "Oh boy, when you're with me...". As slang it is a little dated. Buddy Holly'...


32

"Leave well enough alone." Related, "Let sleeping dogs lie." I've always heard user3169's answer as "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."


31

The idiom I would use is ‘grasping at straws’, for which Cambridge English Dictionary gives two definitions: Grasp at straws: trying to find some way to succeed when nothing you choose is likely to work: We searched all the backup tapes, trying to find the missing files, but we knew we were grasping at straws. trying to find a reason to feel hopeful in a ...


15

In the gaming community, there's the phrase glass cannon. What does “glass cannon” mean? “Glass cannon” is used to refer to characters or objects that are extremely powerful offensively yet are also extremely weak defensively. Obviously, the most common usage would be within action games where you care about the offensive and defensive powers of a character....


15

Both a force is best confronted with a force of the same nature and Using controlled fires to stop a wildfire. Are very directly equivalent to fight fire with fire, as per the existing answer. However it takes someone at the same level as someone else to defeat them isn't really the same idiom in English. Something like set a thief to catch a thief or ...


15

The expression "gilding the lily" means to add needless changes to something that's already of high value or near-perfect. So "don't gild the lily" would perhaps covey what you're looking for. Or, "don't wreck a good thing" might fit, if the proposed changes were obviously going to lower its value. But this is very commonly used ...


14

As you say, притянутый за уши аргумент is an argument that is weak or fallacious. In English you might call it a specious argument, or one that doesn't hold water (i.e. full of holes).


10

This is actually a biblical reference: Iron sharpens iron, So one man sharpens another. Proverbs 27:17 (NASB) So, at least in English-speaking Judeo-Christian circles, the idiom stands as-is and is relatively well recognized as a biblical proverb. It has the expanded meaning that a person of strong faith can help a person of weaker faith grow by relating ...


9

Here are two other proverbs that mean the same thing. "Never change a running system" "Don't change a winning team" Also, the correct proverb is "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."


8

As suggested by @darth-pseudonym, you should split your question into two different ones: one for the idiom and another one for the IBM "deciphering". I'm going to answer the second. According to the Oxford Dictionary decipher Convert (a text written in code, or a coded signal) into normal language. Notice that IBM is not a ciphered, coded or ...


7

In boxing "Glass jaw" is a term that is sometimes used to describe some boxers who may be exceptional fighters, but seem to be knocked down or knocked out more easily than others. The sentiment is that while they may have a respectable record, this likely keeps them from being truly competitive amongst the very top boxers in the world.


7

I would use sharp tongue, thin skin which was a common expression where I grew up in Idaho.


7

Can I say “Oh boy” to a girl? The best way to understand this issue for an English learner. When you utter phrases such as ... "Fuck!" "O-M-G!" "Oh Boy!" "Wow! "Holy Hell!" ... you are not addressing anyone. That speech fragment is not directed to the person you are talking to. They are exclamations. ...


6

Make a mountain out of a molehill. Make a stink.


5

A possible English idiom is to chop logic, which means "to argue, especially in a hairsplitting way" as a verb. You might use it like Howard, aware that he was losing the argument, was reduced to chopping logic to salvage some of his pride.


5

If you want a lighthearted way to joke about someone trying to fix something that they should have left alone, there's "If it ain't broke, fix it 'til it is"


4

In your examples 1 and 2, we would normally omit the "up" (and, thanks @Lambie, "bungle" should take a more specific argument): The builders really botched this room. The builders really bungled the job on this room. In British English at least, these mean pretty much the same thing, and it's not what you're looking for. It means they ...


4

you are in a situation where you experience the lack of proofs and instead of accepting the fact that you're wrong, you are trying to find a very shaky, sometimes even illogical argument in order to factitiously prove your 'correctness'. This can be described as hand-waving — the metaphor is of someone who does a lot of gesturing and emoting in an argument ...


4

The main one that comes to mind is to "go above and beyond", which Cambridge dictionary gives as to do more or better than would usually be expected of someone If you wanted to thank someone directly, you could say: Thanks very much for your help last week. I just wanted someone to pick me up from the hospital, but you got me some groceries and ...


4

Your suggested expressions are not good English; rather, you could say: This/That seems crazy to me. but "strikes" seems to be the best option (although I think you excluded that in your title): That strikes me as a bit crazy. or just (and a bit stronger): That's crazy! This is crazy! (stronger still): That's totally crazy!


4

"The great is the enemy of the good." When you have something that is good enough, do not risk making it worse, just because you are tempted to try to make it great. Variations are often seen, such as, "The perfect is the enemy of the good." See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perfect_is_the_enemy_of_good


4

"Don't reinvent the wheel"


4

I'd probably use the term "my mind went blank" for a generic my brain has stopped working. Free Dictionary It doesn't seem to quite fit your needs, though; it seems you're talking about a kind of mental exhaustion in your first example (dealing with a tough question), and a feeling of being overwhelmed in your second (seeing a fabulous view). For ...


4

From what comes to mind, I'd suggest finger-licking good and lip-smacking.


4

In New York at least, we'd often call such a person a "schlemiel". If that doesn't work for you, then I'd recommend a thesaurus, as Ethan Bolker suggested. E.g., there are plenty of synonyms here: https://www.merriam-webster.com/thesaurus/schlemiel


3

There is such a saying, worded very closely to what you say in your question: "Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today."


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