12

My suggestion: Use this tag for questions about expected behavior, the correct code of conduct for different styles of martial arts, and communication among martial artists and with others. Why say "interpersonal"? Who but persons are communicating?


4

It is not "standard" English. It is being used as a joke here. Look how the scientist responds: "Science" you? It's clear that he/she doesn't understand what Ava means. So, unless you are making a joke, don't do this. For "Mathematics" the same joke works (so don't use it except as a joke) This problem is hard, so I'm going ...


2

Both are possible, but I feel that, especially in speech, "I got $100 back" is more likely. "Get back" is a separable phrasal-verb. Moreover expressions like "get my wallet back" are certainly possible.


2

The most polite and idiomatic way to ask would be "Please may I get some water". "May I have" is also fine, but it sounds like you're asking them to get the water for you. "Get" makes it clear you will draw the water from the fountain yourself once you've had the approval to do so. It doesn't sound right asking to "take&...


2

"Mass gatherings" refers to multiple events, where each event is attended by large numbers - "masses" - of people. If you just want to have smaller gatherings, you would prefer We should reduce the size of gatherings, for COVID-19 note the use of a comma - it helps make it clear that the gathering isn't "for" COVID-19, as ...


2

How about Use this tag for questions about expected behavior, the correct code of conduct for different styles of martial arts, and interpersonal communication not only among martial artists but also between them and non-martial artists. That removes one of the instances of the phrase martial artists while maintaining the overall meaning (I hope).


2

If this is speech, not in writing, I would only be concerned about how the beginning sounds like you are telling or informing your boss of what you are doing, and not asking. My initial assumption is that the boss has some measure of control and the proper social thing to do is to ask if you may have permission to take off early, due to the listed reasons, ...


2

This really depends on whether there is an acceptance process or not. To sign up means to formally state your wish to join the class. To join means to actually start attending lessons. If acceptance is automatic, then you can probably use these terms interchangeably. However, acceptance may not be automatic. Maybe it's an advanced class that requires an ...


2

Neither of these is wrong. They are different. They mean different things. When you use the word ‘can’ you are speaking of your ability. When you leave the word ‘can’ out you were speaking of what has happened to you. So the person that says ‘I hear it’ indicates that this has happened to him lots of times and during those times he has heard it. The person ...


1

Give me a bite -- grammatically correct, sounds a little like you are demanding a bite. Share me a bite -- this is not correct English. 'Share' does not take a direct object like 'give' does. Let me take a bite -- grammatically correct, a little awkward. It sounds like you're saying that refusing to 'let' the speaker take a bite is somehow unexpected. Can ...


1

They are similar, but no use is stronger than not much use. By stronger, I mean that the probability of success in no use is lower than in not much use. With not much use, the softener much indicates that there may be some possibility of a successful outcome, even it if is still very unlikely. Of your sentences, 1 and 3 are the same, while 2 and 4 are the ...


1

To me, “use the bathroom” is idiomatic to American English, and “go to the toilet” is idiomatic to British English (though it’s also idiomatic and polite to say “use your/the toilet” in British English, for example, when you’re a guest in someone’s home - saying “use” is a way to acknowledge their ownership and what we acknowledge may be seen as our ...


1

The meaning of "feel" is already contained in "miss", so it should be dropped from the first two examples. In the third example, "longing" acts as a noun, so it can be the object of "feel". So, these are natural expressions: I miss her a lot. I'm missing her a lot now. I feel longing for her now. While the third ...


1

In your case, if attending the class requires registration or similar enrollment process, then use I signed up for a dance class. I joined a dance class sounds more abstract. It doesn't tell anything about the class, whether it requires registration or enrollment process.


1

Usually, you speak of putting the vehicle in a particular gear, rather than putting the gear in a particular condition. The latter isn't wrong, it's just unusual. For your sentence, I would say I put the car in reverse, backed out of the driveway, then put it in drive and drove off. That's if the car has an automatic transmission. If it's a manual ...


1

Both of those uses are equally valid. As to which is more common, "atop" is a somewhat archaic word that is not frequently used in modern English. If used today, it is often in a poetic or literary context. The latter use is more poetic. Modern English would say The bird perched on top of the tower or The bird perched on the tower


1

In the context of a PowerPoint presentation, a "deck" is a collection of slides (closely related to a "deck of cards" (def. 4), so if you're referring to a single .ppt(x) file, use "deck" (singular). If you're referring to a set of presentations (multiple .ppt(x) files), use "decks" (plural).


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