65 votes

My dad doesn't want me to TOUCH alcohol

It is a form of clichéd hyperbole, but so natural and common that it may not be noticed as such. What the father literally wants is for the child not to drink alcohol. Drinking generally requires ...
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  • 1,267
52 votes

My dad doesn't want me to TOUCH alcohol

Yes, it is perfectly natural. Not to touch something can mean to avoid or reject it.
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  • 29.9k
3 votes
Accepted

What are more natural ways to say that your test scores are decreasing?

I would say it depends on the type of English you're trying to speak and the level of formality you're trying to achieve. American (US) English speakers would probably use "grades" instead ...
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2 votes

Did you spend it with her?

You can speak of spending any period of time in a certain way; the fact that it's someone's birthday makes no difference. I spent an hour tidying the kitchen. I'm spending Christmas with my parents. ...
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2 votes

What does "professor of sorts" mean?

A something of sorts e.g. a professor of sorts , or an artist of sorts, a mechanic of sorts etc is an idiomatic expression meaning the same thing as a sort of professor, a sort of artist etc. It ...
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  • 2,478
2 votes

Meaning of "make" in "Can you make me a copy of this?"

"Me", in your example, is the indirect object. Indirect objects are quite common in formal and in colloquial English. For example, Hand *me* the book. I gave *her* the money. Would you ...
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1 vote

What does the "aura of office" mean?

It's not a known phrase, so you could have perhaps looked up 'aura' and 'office' respectively in a dictionary and found the answer. However, 'office' has many different meanings so I appreciate it ...
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  • 72k
1 vote
Accepted

Meaning of "make" in "Can you make me a copy of this?"

Can you make me a copy of this? Can you make a copy of this for me? Both forms are fine and are similar. These two sentences have the respective constructions: a. modal verb + S + V + NP Dative + ...
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1 vote

Is a noun used for multiple adjectives singular or plural?

The first sentence indicates that each value has only one field (which is described as "previous and next"); that is incorrect, according to what you wrote. The second sentence is correct ...
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