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47

I think the simplest, yet most idiomatic way to say that in English would be this: Cover her eyes with your hands. Or, as was suggested by brichins down below, the sentence can be made even shorter: Cover her eyes. if it's implied that it is your hands that you're going to use to cover her eyes.


25

It's a pun, not correct English. The proper idiom is "Nice to meet you" but the character is throwing wheat crackers, so he substitutes the rhyming word (meet/wheat) to make a joke.


20

"You are your own biggest fan." This would be an informal way of saying the same thing. It could be used positively or negatively. If used in a negative sense, it is stating sarcastically that the person thinks too much of himself. Here's a link to an Internet search showing how similar sayings are used in a self-affirming sense: Link to search results


19

They are not equivalent. "On the way" means that the location or object is along, adjacent to, or near some route. If we're going to John's house, can we stop by the store to pick up some snacks? It's on the way. "In the way" means that the location or object is directly in the path or blocking that route. You used to be able to see the ocean from ...


16

The difference is somewhat subtle, but the shifting around of the words really does change the emphasis, with that emphasis being on what directly follows the main verb: I'd like something to drink. This emphasizes that you care about the something rather than the act of drinking. This is most often used in restaurants or other situations where you're ...


14

Statements like this typically use your own X: You are your own first supporter. This: You are your self first supporter sounds awkward. Self is not used as a modifier very often except as part of fixed phrases like self service.


13

While you can do things with good manners, it is rare to direct someone to do so in imperatives. Unless addressing children, it is not required to remind people to be polite— a person with good upbringing has good manners out of habit; an poorly raised person cannot tell the difference, anyway. This may reflect a difference of cultural perception, but I ...


13

In Japan, there are many odd (and sometimes unintentionally hilarious) signs with translations of Japanese phrases into English. This is a good example, as "please smoke with good manners" is not at all idiomatic. A more idiomatic version might be: Please be considerate of others when smoking in the area surrounded by planters. or Please be ...


12

It is possible that your understanding of the situation is correct: the speaker knows that Andy did in fact 'chance it'. In this case Luke Sawczak's reading is likely: the would expresses a sort of 'fuzziness' about the speaker's reaction to a known past event. But it is also possible that the would expresses the speaker's inference respecting an uncertain ...


12

Here is a rhetorical question that makes the original poster's point: If you don't believe in yourself, who will?


12

To think in this context is an idiomatic expression used to express surprise or dismay and thus is not constrained by typical grammar rules about infinitives as subjects. As a whole, its meaning is along the lines of "It's surprising that..." or "It's shameful that..." It doesn't mean "Thinking that..." as it would in a sentence like "To think ...


10

This sentence is grammatically correct, and unambiguously expresses your intended meaning. To my (American) ear, it sounds like a nineteenth-century novel. It does not sound natural to me. "As must" is now rarely used.


10

'come' here is not a finite verb, but a past participle used as an adjective modifying 'nightingale'. The original sentence could be expanded as: There's a bird on the lawn that I think must be a nightingale that is come over on the Cunard or White Star Line. The unusual thing about this sentence is the use of the past participle 'come' as an adjective ...


10

The simple answer is that it's perfectly normal English. As others have pointed out, "I feel like eating" isn't really a direct answer to the question, but indirect answers are the kind of thing you can do in any language. The more comfortable you get with English, the more you can play around with words to say pretty much anything: Albert: Are you ...


9

"Put your hands over her eyes" would be most natural to me. ("Over" seems more natural than "on" but I can't really explain why. Perhaps "on" feels like you're saying to touch her eyes, which would be painful.) If you said "blindfold her with your hand(s)", that would be understood perfectly. "Catch her eyes off" makes no sense to me and I wouldn't be able ...


9

None of your examples feel natural to me. As an American in the western U.S., we would simply say "close your eyes," it being implicit that the eyes may need to be covered (by one's hands or something else) to ensure the necessary blindness or surprise. It is a common enough concept in my area that a surprise should be met with covered eyes that I don't ...


9

In this case come is not a finite verb but a participle. If you want to paraphrase the clause it heads as a relative clause you should cast it in the perfect construction: . . . a nightingale which has come over on the Cunard or White Star Line. In grammatical fact, however, this is an adjectival use of the participle. Today we rarely use the ...


9

I don't know about ungrammatical, but it certainly seems unnatural. It would be more usual to have: The pharmaceutical company Avalon was sued for causing Michael's autism. When it's a group or a category or a parameter, then causing X in Y is fine. For an individual, at least for this sort of use, you're right that it seems 'off'.


8

The expression thank you very much is used in this context to keep an imaginary discussion short and curt. It's an emphatic yet not-quite-impolite way of expressing the notion of, "I'm a bit bothered by something you just said; let's not go there." Here are some example uses: Ted: I think you should go out with Linda again. Ed: I think I can make up my ...


8

To my English ear "You must read this book, as must your brother" might easily and naturally be spoken by a parent forcefully emphasising to each sibling individually and without ambiguity that neither of them has a choice... (Looking at one child) "You must read this book,..." (turning to look at the brother) "...as must your brother!"


8

Actually, the expression changes depending on the circumstance, in a job the most senior person is often used to refer to the one there longest, but can also mean the highest in the heirarchy. oldest often gets used, but can be confused with chronological age, usually additional context is provided. oldest tenured employee longest serving ...


7

'On foot' is the more commonly used expression.This also stems from the fact that 'on' is usually used for actions involving body parts. 'By' is usually used to talk about a means of transport (i.e. train, car, boat, plane, etc). They both have the same meaning, albeit with different grammatical structure. We can use say both – with these ...


7

The most common way to express fractions (or ratios) is with "over". 3/4 is three over four 7/15 is seven over fifteen. So in your example: A = B/C A is equal to B over C However your "bulky" way is better for anything other than casual conversation, such as a school report.


7

You can say "something happened to my phone". That tells your listener that the thing that happened, happened in the past. Your listener doesn't know whether there is still a problem. So you'd have to add more information: "something happened to my phone and now I can receive calls but not call anyone". Or, "something has happened to my phone". Now we ...


7

First of all, there would be nothing wrong with using "Let's roll up our shirt sleeves," even if the workers were shirtless. That has become a figurative expression, not a literal one, and rarely are actual shirt sleeves rolled up when people say it. That said, the idiom seems to mean, "Let's get underway," more so that in means, "Let's work hard." I think ...


7

As an American (who has lived in the midwest and east coast), a common phrase I would use is Shield her eyes! to indicate covering their eyes so they cannot see. This has the same meaning as "cover", but the use of "shield" adds a sense of urgency or need to avoid danger. Because it sounds exaggerated, I most often hear this in playful and joking ...


7

You're right, the first two phrases mean the team is winning. It's used here in the sense of 2 b: to or at an ultimate objective (such as a goal or finish line) // fired the puck home (source: Merriam-Webster) The form of his life means that the player is in his best form ever, see the following definition of 'of one's life': Being the greatest, ...


7

It's a reference to the movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knights_Who_Say_%22Ni!%22


6

Ratios are most often notated as a:b, rather than a/b, which is said "a to b". For example, if I have ten bananas and four apples then I could say the ratio of bananas to apples is 5 to 2 (or 10 to 4). So in your situation you could say: Voter turnout is the ratio of votes cast to registered voters. To emphasize that a is a sub-set of b we often use the ...


6

I can't remember ever seeing this exact combination, but I don't think that is what the book is trying to teach. Learners may think that Yes/No questions must always be answered with "Yes", or "No". But if you actually see how people talk, they often don't respond like that. Instead they continue the conversation. So you could have Are you hungry? Well,...


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