46

Feet is the more common, conversational usage in the U.S. Your speaker would say he sat nine feet away from me Yards are often used to describe particular things that are traditionally measured in yards. Sports often use yards to describe distances. A football field is measured in yards. A golf hole is measured in yards. Foot races used to be measured ...


42

I am very much on board with FumbleFingers' comment. Suspecting neither, that most would call it "feet", but rather than being precise would instead say "about 10 feet". Accurate measures are really only used in contexts where they matter.


40

From a computing perspective, I would not perceive a negative connotation to the word “disabled”, as it is a very common term. Part of the negative connotation it has in referring to people is precisely because it is so commonly used in connection to inanimate objects. However, there is a difference in subtext between “disabled” and “not enabled” and it ...


39

If something (or someone) is banned in a place, that thing is not permitted in that place—it is not allowed to be inside the boundary. If something (or someone) is banned from a place, that thing is not permitted to go to that place—it is not allowed to cross the boundary. So only something that can move, or something that can be moved, or something that can ...


18

randomhead's answer explains the difference very well. To illustrate the two meanings: Salman Rushdie is banned in Iran. This means that it is illegal to own or sell the works of the writer Salman Rushdie in Iran. Salman Rushdie is banned from Iran. This means that Salman Rushdie is forbidden to visit Iran.


12

They are dependant on context – whether a feature or property is usually available. For example The password protection has been disabled. Administrator access has not been enabled. So although they appear to be synonyms, there can be additional information implied by the writer, or inferred by the reader.


11

My initial thought was that feet would be much more commonly used. Ngrams backs that up.


10

Either is idiomatic. We tend to like more readily visualizable distances, an inch before a foot, a foot before a yard, a yard before a mile. But we also tend to like smaller numbers and whole numbers. We would be more likely to say 5 feet than 60 inches, but 18 inches rather than one and a half feet. Between three yards and nine feet, I suspect it would be ...


7

In both cases, we have a form of the verb ban plus a prepositional phrase. In both cases, we're using ban to mean “prohibit especially by legal means.” In the case of banned in, the preposition in describes the location of the ban. Banning is done through some rule, law, decree, or so on, and that that act has a limit. The prepositional phrase simply ...


7

Specifically in a computing context, they may differ in meaning depending on the normal default value. However, it's not guaranteed that these implications can be drawn. "Disabled" might imply that the default is enabled, and an action has been taken by someone or something to disable it. Or it may be a simple statement of fact. "Not enabled&...


7

In some contexts "disabled" can also mean "not changeable" or "not available", especially when used with a passive voice ("this option has been disabled"). For example a checkbox can be turned on, turned off or be disabled.


5

I don't think an American would try to be precise as '9 feet' unless it was somehow important. In the context of sitting distance it seems unimportant to me so it's more likely they'd say 'roughly 9 feet away' or 'about 9 feet away' than anything else. Now even more likely is that they round up to 10 feet as then it becomes clear that it's an estimate. If ...


5

I think the negative connotation you perceive is related to speaking about people, which is actually the first meaning on this dictionary. As far as definitions go, enabled and disabled are opposites (see 1c here versus 2 above). As long as we make clear we are not talking about people there is no problem using the word disabled. "Make sure the delete ...


4

Depending on context, yes, disabled can have a negative connotation. In the past it has been used to refer to individuals whom have a physical or mental impairment, but the word has fallen out of favor. As far as computing contexts, disabled and not enabled mean the same thing. Note: I'm aware that some people might want to dispute that, saying that not ...


4

Relatively small distances (such as 9 feet/3 yards) would normally be given in feet, as yards introduce too much "slop" (plus or minus amount) for comfort. 3 yards would technically mean somewhere between 2.5 and 3.5 yards (7.5 to 10.5 feet), which is too imprecise for most people when talking about such distances. 9 feet would be 8.5 to 9.5 feet, ...


3

In my experience, Americans rarely use yards as a unit of measurement in everyday conversation unless they're talking about golf, American football, or distances that are more than 50 feet or so.


3

The on is, in fact, not necessary and leaving it in makes the sentence incorrect as well as awkward. "I don't have a clue how to do this" is a perfectly fine sentence.


3

We use both but in some circumstances only one would do. For instance you ask someone for their mobile number not their phone number to avoid confusion with their landline number. If you are referring to some other function of the device you might call it a smartphone, for instance telling someone that they can take a picture of something and send it to you ...


3

The only correct ones are into or to, and into is far more common than anything else. Think of the translation as being like motion - in fact, the word translate itself comes from the Latin meaning "to carry over". You are not just "within" English, but carrying the work into English from somewhere else, much like the difference between ...


2

In standard English the second would be correct and the first incorrect. Alternatively you could use "What has football got to do with French Gourmet?"


2

I probably would not use either “track” or “track down” here. The first dictionary I looked up confirms my intuition: track means “follow the course or trail of,” so I would not normally use it to describe something immobile like landmines. I would say something like find, discover, map, locate or reveal instead.


2

The character Twain was writing about, Pudd'nhead Wilson, is trying to define courage by giving examples of what it is and what it isn't. Courage IS resistance to fear Courage IS mastery of fear But courage IS NOT absence of fear He goes on to give the example of the flea, a tiny, fragile, creature that lives on creatures that are much bigger and stronger ...


2

Just to add as an interesting point, as a native Australian English speaker, I would have said that it's negative. We use the phrase here almost exclusively in the sarcastic sense. I don't watch much American TV, and I was surprised to hear a person (American) running a follow-along style video tutorial use the phrase as encouragement for the viewers. That's ...


2

This is a special meaning of project: American Heritage Dictionary (Psychology) To attribute (one's own emotion or motive, for example) to someone else unconsciously in order to avoid anxiety or guilt. Merriam-Webster to attribute (one's own ideas, feelings, or characteristics) to other people or to objects The crimes don't have to be completely ...


2

The American measurement system developed in a way that there is a bit of overlap between units. Your example is in one of those regions where either would be appropriate and not unwieldy. There is some dependency on the setting as to which unit of measurement would be more appropriate. Yards are typically used for outdoor measurements where the distances ...


2

Both are acceptable. In the first case, "these people" implies the set of people of which this one is a member. In the second case, "this type of person" refers to the specific person as a representative member of the larger set.


2

This [X] behaves like a [Y]. The above sentence structure is usually very good for most noun-phrases [X] and [Y]. This [NPC from "GameA"] behaves like a ["GameB" NPC]. In general, the above sentence also works for most titles of "GameA" or "GameB". This [NPC from GameA] behaves like [a "The Sims" NPC]. ...


2

I don't think there's many good ways to reformulate the sentence if you want to keep it as "the more X happens, the worse this will become." If you want to keep it that way I think the best way would be to say "The more people that are infected at these superspreaders, the worse the pandemic becomes."


2

The addition of do is not idiomatic here. I think you're thinking of the emphatic do, but the emphatic do can only be used for positive, affirmative sentences, and your example is a negative sentence. For example, the following exchange is how the emphatic do is used: "These books don't give you any peace, do they?" "These books do give me ...


1

There is no real need to repeat "hibernation". And "driven out" goes with "cave" not "hibernation" The hibernating bears were driven out of their cave by the construction workers. You could use "disturbed from hibernation" if you do need to repeat the word


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