9 votes

Is saying "decrease by two-fifths" grammatical?

It's grammatical, but less natural than the obvious "decreased by 40%".
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

The expression "that's no way to do something"

Your interpretation is correct. "That's no way to do something" means that the action is either disapproved of or that it is unlikely to work (or both). That's no way to treat a lady. That'...
Peter Jennings's user avatar
4 votes

Is saying "decrease by two-fifths" grammatical?

Yes you can correctly say "decreased by two-fifths." Unless they really need to convey precise information, a native speaker would be more likely to round up "The number of people in ...
Judith Jones's user avatar
3 votes

Is saying "decrease by two-fifths" grammatical?

The sentence "The number of men in the room decreased by two-fifths" is technically correct, but it might not be the most natural or intuitive way to express the situation. It accurately ...
S Z's user avatar
  • 31
1 vote
Accepted

What would you say to cover anything for the missing part? | "You're not too fat, you're not too short, you're not too .......... you think you are."

You're not too fat, you're not too short, you're not too whatever you think you are. - This is grammatically correct, but "whatever" feels a little vague. You're not too fat, you're not too ...
Ali E's user avatar
  • 865
1 vote
Accepted

"Who" and "When" next to each other. ---- "I was waiting at the airport when who should come along but Mr Pettigrew!

This idiom is a little old. It isn't used very frequently, but you can still hear/read it. It is generally used with verbs such as see, come, arrive, etc. You can hear it in stories more often. It ...
Ali E's user avatar
  • 865

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