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The options with both yelling and shouting should be excluded, because the meanings of the two words are too close. That leaves the options that included screaming; that is more intense than yelling or shouting, so it should come second, to avoid anticlimax. That leaves 1 and 6. They are very close, but 6 sounds more natural to me.


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This reads as if the vet is being humble or perhaps ironic. The vet is, we assume, an expert in animal health, and the woman is doubting his/her ability to diagnose the dog's condition. He seems to be ironically saying "I have some experience with animals" to mean "I have a great deal of experience with animals, (and so you shouldn't doubt me)...


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It's natural except for the words a certain experience: when experience is used as a countable, it generally has the meaning of "a particular event of sensation that has been experienced". For the sense you want, it is generally uncountable: Trust me, miss, I do have some experience with this. Or I do have experience or I do have relevant ...


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Yes. This usage is perfect and means exactly what you said.


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This isn't a natural usage of receive. First of all, receive is too formal in the context of the rest of the language. But I think the main problem is that receive is usually used for guests or visitors, and it means 'greet' or 'welcome'. I don't think you will be welcoming them. In your sentence, I think it would be more natural to say: I'm just a little ...


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You won't notice the difference in spoken language, but another option is to separate colours with a slash, for example "green/yellow" or "black/white" to denote those combination of colours. This is very common when describing objects in product listings or technical specifications, less so in more literary uses.


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Particularly for those of us who learned colors from Crayola crayons, the hyphenated form usually represents a blend of the colors — yellow-orange is a single color, of a hue somewhere in between yellow and orange. Different distinct colors used in combination are usually listed out, in contrast. The Austrian flag is red and white, the FC Barcelona jersey is ...


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It's interesting to compare the usage of both orders in the Google Ngram Viewer. In almost all cases, white comes last: Black (about five times as often): Blue (about two times as often): The only exception I could find was yellow, where it's about equal: Roughly, the order seems to be red > black > blue, green > yellow, white In general, the ...


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Yes, they are equivalent. They express that you are stating the crux of some issue.


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If you’re talking about a situation where the person is asking if they really paint paintings, as opposed to just painting walls or whatever, for example, then “actual” is much more idiomatic in my opinion. You’d usually hear something like: What, like, actual paintings? Or: What, actual paintings? This kind of expression is quite modern and has a bit of ...


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If you knew for certain it was broken, you would say “you broke it”. Other common expressions, given that you’ve already described the problem/state (i.e. the car won’t start), would be: My car won’t start - you’ve done something to it! My car won’t start - what have you done to it?! This basically avoids the presumption inherent in saying “you broke it”, ...


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No matter what [...] and No matter why [...] are stock phrases that mean "in any case" and "regardless of cause" respectively. They really add little meaning to a sentence. No matter how [...] is also a stock phrase normally meaning "without regard to manner or means." No matter how, we need to get to New York by tomorrow. ...


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There are a few problems with this, in my opinion. Firstly, the phrasal verb chase after is usually used in literal situations where someone is actually pursuing someone else. I chased after the pickpocket who stole my wallet. The dog chased after the cat but couldn't catch it. If you want to use 'chase' figuratively, you can use chase + Noun. For example: ...


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They are almost equally natural, with a possible variation in meaning, depending on the wider context of the discussion. "leave" refers better to the situation when disappearing from the restaurant is the desired final outcome. "go" might fit better if leaving is just a side effect, while the final outcome is getting (going) to a specific ...


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Agree that "it's going badly" is best, because that describes pretty much any process which is proceeding towards failure, with the adverb "badly" modifying the verb "going." "It's going bad" implies that a particular item, especially food, is becoming inedible.


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It’s generally acceptable, especially in speech, but does have a bit of a slang vibe to it; it would sound more proper to say “badly”. Notice that “going that good” also doesn’t sound right, and should be “going that well”. If you just google “going that bad” you should see a lot more results and get a good idea of when this would be used, but it is fine in ...


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These are not cliches. A cliche is an expression that has been overused to the extent that it loses its original meaning - but some expressions bear repetition and their meaning does not change. You wouldn't say that "good morning" is a 'cliche', and yet people say it every single day. "Get well soon", and your other examples, are ...


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In a sense, it depends on what you want to express, and not on idiomatic language. So yes, both look idiomatic, and can be followed by a that-clause. HOWEVER: I can tell ... ( most likely to mean - ascertain); I can sense ... ( it literally means I can sense; it may bear some metaphorical meaning );


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