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Consider the sentences 1) Storing paper-based books is more difficult than (storing) electronic books. 2) To store paper-based books is more difficult... In this case "storing" or "to store" is a gerund - A verb form (the present participle or infinitive) used as a noun, in this case, the subject of the sentence. But since storing is being used as a ...


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The expression "holes-in-her-purse" is a person. It is a person who Walt believes has (metaphorical) holes in her purse. It is someone who never has cash, a spendthrift or wasteful person. The adjective "old" is being used casually and suggests "someone who we have known for a long time". If you know the series you will know who she is. So the whole ...


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As others have said, it's a phone number, in this case 148-3369. But what I suspect you're really asking about is more of a formulation of X to the Y to the Z to the A In this case, the message on the answering machine is emulating a common way of speaking in rap music (the "yo yo yo" is another hint). Consider Rapper's Delight, widely considered the ...


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It's the person's phone number, without the first 3 digits : 148-3369. Some people still say phone numbers like this, in areas with lots of small towns, where you know that everyone has the first three digits.


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i think its a phone number?? i know phone numbers used to have 3 numbers-4 numbers, instead of today's phone numbers that are 3 numbers-3 numbers-4 numbers.


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It is a fact that there were reports. We would have to use our judgement of the quality of the sources for whether we have confidence that the reports are true. The BBC reports that senior MacDonald's execs are suing for racial discrimination. If you consider the BBC to be a generally reliable source of news then you would believe that the executives ...


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The most common way to ask someone how they slept is the following Did you sleep well? A lover might also tag the following effusion "darling", "my love", "my sweet", "honey" etc. From the ThoughtCo website here are other ways of greeting someone when you wake up in the morning Good morning I hope you had a good night's sleep. I hope you got ...


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It's fine, though from the way you asked the question, it sounds more like you are asking someone directly, in which case: What is it like for you? You could also say: How do you cope? How do you deal with it?


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In your case, at least, it would be understood. So, "I'm going to go Amazon shopping" is well understood in the context of buying something online. Nevertheless, I'm going to shop on Amazon would be more idiomatic. When brands become immensely popular, anything would work! The proper nouns become verbs! In future, who knows, you may amazon something? The ...


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If you're talking about a movie with someone, then "in the movie" and "from the movie" are pretty interchangeable. If you're watching a movie review program and they show one of the movie's scenes, "from" is used much more than "in": Here is a clip from the movie. This is because to show the clip, they've had to take it "out" of the movie, so it's no ...


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Ignoring other Off Topic "proofreading" aspects of my earlier comment, Yes - the sequence lost time and lost money is perfectly idiomatic (and common, as shown by many written instances in that link). It's also common (but not required) to "delete" the second (predictably repeated) instance of lost in such constructions, but no article should be present - ...


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Unlike Astralbee, I do not live where "backwards and forwards" is a common phrase at all. The equivalent to what you are trying to say is "coming and going" or more rarely "going and coming." Because most people know that buses and trams make round trips from A to B and then from B to A, I think you can stay very close to the original and be understood. ...


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It isn't "idiomatic", but I don't really think you mean "idiomatic" either. This is terminology. I believe the correct terminology you are looking for is "assign the variable a value". I didn't assign the variable a custom value yet, don't use it.


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Speaking in the present you would say: This is the first time I've eaten lobster. This is the first time he's seen a homeless person. There is no particular point in the past that you're referring to. Rather, you're referring to the entire period preceding the present. When you write That was the first time he had seen a homeless person. you ...


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He killed himself. [suicide] He was killed by himself is not accurate really unless you are contrasting it to: He was killed by his friend. Even so, it's really awkward and unnecessary as "He killed himself" is what it means. However, one does see the idiom: He died by his own hand. for to kill onself. [not a very happy subject....] dictionary - by one's ...


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The two sentences would be interpreted to mean different things. The first states that he committed suicide or that he died as a result of his own actions if not intentionally: eg: He killed himself by drinking to excess. The second would be understood to mean that he was alone when he was killed - not that he took his own life, as per FumbleFingers ...


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I think you have answered your own question. You have done good research, and it shows that "cigarette butts" is more commonly used than the other alternative. A "butt" is "the part of a finished cigarette that has not been smoked" (Cambridge). Another term for this, but much less common, is "stub". A "stub" is "the short part of something that is left ...


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If you want an exact equivalent (such that whatever follows wouldn't have to be changed to make sense) alternatives could be: There is a chance of... There is a risk of/danger of... (for bad things) Let's say the original phrase is "There is a possibility of rain" (note that rain is a noun rather than a verb). You could add "rain" to those and it would ...


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You can say this in many different ways. A complete sentence would make it much easier to point out other alternatives. You have to look at synonyms of "possibility" to actually build similar expressions. From the top of my head, here are few alternatives: there is a chance that ... there is little likelihood that ... it is quite likely that ... there ...


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Some alternatives for your consideration: "It is commonly held that a good developer must know algorithms." "The general belief is that a good developer must know algorithms." "It is generally believed that a good developer must know algorithms." "Most consider that a good developer must know algorithms." "Most expect a good developer ...


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