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1

The question: What other good C++ books are there? is correct. It is a specific form of: What other things are there? where "other things" = "other C++ books"


1

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/save intransitive verb 1 : to rescue or deliver someone 2a : to put aside money b : to avoid unnecessary waste or expense : ECONOMIZE c : to spend less money So, yes, using meaning 2c, one can say "save on the electricity bill" to mean "spend less money on the electricity bill".


3

Words are often omitted when they are clear from the context. I can say I ate at a restaurant yesterday. I don't have to say "I ate food ...", it is implied by the context and the meaning of the word "ate". Similarly "Save on your electricity bill" implies "save money" since a bill is a demand for money and so the context makes it clear. This is not ...


7

It's a reference to the movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Knights_Who_Say_%22Ni!%22


12

To think in this context is an idiomatic expression used to express surprise or dismay and thus is not constrained by typical grammar rules about infinitives as subjects. As a whole, its meaning is along the lines of "It's surprising that..." or "It's shameful that..." It doesn't mean "Thinking that..." as it would in a sentence like "To think ...


2

It depends on what the definition is trying to imply. If you want to say that a peephole is primarily used to surreptitiously "peep in" on someone, then yes, using "in" makes sense. However, peepholes serve various purposes. Many doors have one-way peepholes used for looking out, to check who is at the door before opening it. If you want a more general ...


2

Gibberish is a noun in it's own right, so I wouldn't use it as a qualifier for any other specific language. I would say garbled English to give the sense that the words being used might be identified as English words, but the words are combined in a confused or nonsensical manner.


2

Both examples in the original post are grammatically correct. The original poster's proposed definition is better than the dictionary definition. Peepholes can be made on purpose, or can occur naturally. All peepholes can be looked "through". In America, many houses and apartments have peepholes in their front doors. These peepholes have lenses, so that ...


1

Actually the idiomatic phrase is to take a gamble. Example: He's taking a gamble dating that woman, he's not her type.


2

"He turned out to be an enemy" is fine, but doesn't really explore the numerous words and phrases that describe someone who becomes an adversary of the people who thought they were his friends. For example, there are all the words that more or less mean "traitor": turncoat, renegade, deceiver, betrayer, quisling, snake, rat, double-crosser, back-stabber, ...


-2

Firstly I'd like to mention, "Invited someone over to X" is not grammatical, it doesn't represent a subject and an action. That is, unless you extended it to a sentence like: "Invited someone over to X if you're okay with it," but it's more of a slang (short language) version and would be more professional to use "I invited" in that circumstance. Your ...


3

As when learning any language, past a certain point, it's best to abandon grammar rules and focus instead on the information the writer or speaker is trying to convey. Let's take a related example: Her face momentarily flashed just the hint of a smile. Her face momentarily flashed just a hint of a smile. In the larger context there is likely no ...


1

A Google search currently gives me 184 results---it can be found, but it isn't common. It's more common to collocate two terms that are grammatically similar to each other, such as: Life in the past and present London yesterday and today (implies a broad meaning of 'yesterday' that can cover past decades) London then and now


1

"$20 billion of US bonds" is fine. It's already obvious that $20 billion is the value, so "worth" is not necessary. You can't shorten it further without impairing readability or leaving out some information. You could abbreviate "$20 billion" to "$20G", but some readers wouldn't understand. If you don't care that it's in US bonds, you could just say "$20 ...


0

The specific phrase "slipped up on" means "made a mistake about" or "made a mistake in regard to. The phrase folloing "on" indicates exactly what the mistake concerned. In this use, on does not imply "during" or 'while" as it can in other constructions. He slipped up on just one detail. One detail was incorrect, althoguh everythign else was right. Often ...


0

"Good-looking" is normally hyphenated, as it is an idiomatic expression. It is used to describe someone's natural looks, ie their facial features and perhaps their physique too. When someone is described as "good-looking" you would not expect that to change on a day-to-day basis (although good looks can eventually fade!) It is normally used to express ...


0

In addition to the other answers given, I'd say "He is good looking" implies that he's attractive in general, while "He is looking good" gives a more contrastive impression. As in, "He is looking good" implies that he's looking better than he usually does.


2

Alternatively, keeping "manners" in the title, it could be phrased as: Practice good manners while smoking in the area surrounded by planters. Although "courteous" is what they're trying for with that translation, it is understandable.


0

If you want to maintain your sentence as much as possible, I would simply use job market and qualify it with the appropriate adjective: There was a huge lack of labor in the janitor janitorial job market.


2

A native Japanese. We are so embarrassed that our English literacy is so low despite the mandatory English study span is 6 years in the shortest. For example, a guidance of a community bus of one of the wealthiest district of a prefecture says, Abide by Low. O.K. How can we abide by Low, man! Correct it to Law right now! But towards 2020 Tokyo Olympic,...


13

In Japan, there are many odd (and sometimes unintentionally hilarious) signs with translations of Japanese phrases into English. This is a good example, as "please smoke with good manners" is not at all idiomatic. A more idiomatic version might be: Please be considerate of others when smoking in the area surrounded by planters. or Please be ...


2

A Japanese speaker might offer a better phrased translation, but this doesn’t seem too bad. One can use good manners in other actions. A smoker can be mindful of those nearby and carefully dispose of the remains. That would seem to be good manners. As others noted, “be considerate” would be how one would word this in English, typically.


13

While you can do things with good manners, it is rare to direct someone to do so in imperatives. Unless addressing children, it is not required to remind people to be polite— a person with good upbringing has good manners out of habit; an poorly raised person cannot tell the difference, anyway. This may reflect a difference of cultural perception, but I ...


2

It is not uncommon to see "with good manners". For example see Google and Google Books. You can learn good manners, practice good manners, or keep good manners.


2

The job market relates to the entire pool of jobs available. When formally referring to one particular job (or kind of job) use instead "field": There is a huge demand in the janitorial field That being said, "field" is normally associated with certain white-collar jobs, but overly formal when talking about blue-collar jobs. Instead I would say ...


1

Neither "from this reason" nor "by this reason" are quite right. The preposition usually used with a reason is "for": "People like to be happy; For this reason, they agree to pay for it." That sentence is exactly equivalent to "People like to be happy; That's why they agree to pay for it." Both are idiomatic and sound fine. Other expressions for "...


0

When people talk about their dreams, they almost always talk about dreams they've had: You wouldn't believe the dream I had last night. I've been having these strange dreams lately! So, in your sentence, it would most likely be: You haven't had my dreams, sweetheart. They're exciting and fun for the most part. It would be highly unusual for anybody ...


6

"Your time is up" is a common idiomatic phrase for telling someone they are about to die. The response by Frosty the Snow Chick is snarky and takes the inquiry somewhat literally. A proper response to the question can vary from: Nothing much. (i.e., I have nothing going in my life that's notable.) or I'm doing/going/seeing X Y today or this weekend. ...


2

As James's answer mentions, this is a bit of an abstract concept to begin with, but You haven't dreamt my dreams. might have the connotation that you are seeking. This implies that the "sweetheart" has never experienced first-hand in his/her own dreams what the dreamer has experienced.


4

"You haven't seen my dreams" is the best expression. It is a little weird, but the idea that you want to express is a little weird. In the exact context, I'd probably just say "Not my dreams, they're exciting and fun" In a wider sense, consider "You don't (or can't) share my dreams."


2

The sentence is fine but can be condensed if desired You can condense the wording like this: We should replace all the old NHL goaltenders with younger, less experienced AHL goaltenders to increase the number of goals. This is a matter of style, however, not grammar. As it is, the sentence doesn't sound "odd." In fact, by writing it out as you have, the ...


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