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9 votes
Accepted

(How) can I say 'state of the [non-art]'?

The "idiom" you may be thinking of is "State of the Union", an address given by the President of the USA to Congress each year. Many other uses of the phrase consciously or ...
James K's user avatar
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7 votes

to paint someone (other than oneself) "into a corner"

You can only paint someone else into a corner if they're holding your paint pot ;) To paint yourself into a corner is to, by your own action, make it impossible to get out of a difficult situation, ...
DoneWithThis.'s user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Politicians talk too much

This is a joke. "Politicians" are people who have an elected office in a legislature or senate (for example). Their job involves lots of discussion. So they have to talk a lot. Some people ...
James K's user avatar
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3 votes
Accepted

Which one is more idiomatic: "to be able to see out of both eyes." OR "to be able to see with/in both eyes."?

To see is to perceive with your eyes. That could be one eye, or two eyes, depending on various conditions. "See with both eyes" is more likely to be used in contexts where you are discussing ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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3 votes
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I must now take hold myself

The sentence means that the speaker had to stop looking to Jim for help and instead accept responsibility himself to take the problem(s) in hand and resolve it (or them) on his own. What he’s taking ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
3 votes

the meaning of "more or less"

"More or less" idiomatically means that the associated statement is correct within reason or within a reasonable margin. For example, if someone did a quick, rough count of something and ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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3 votes

Any subtle differences in "you don't let great guys get away" vs "go away"?

Don't let them go away implies you need to stop them wandering off, whereas Don't let them get away implies you need to stop them escaping. Both are perfectly credible for OP's context - it just ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes

meaning of "I've been you"

It probably means "I've been in your situation" (and so I know you are lying, because I lied when I was in that situation). Of course it doesn't literally mean "I've been in your ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
2 votes

"get the answer right" what's the part of speech of 'right' here?

That is an adjective. It is a complement in the clause, completing the clause headed by "gets" and describing the answers that they get. It's not an adverb. It doesn't function to modify the ...
James K's user avatar
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2 votes
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Meaning of "raise copy out of me"

'Raise is a verb meaning, in this piece, 'cause to exist'. Raise (Cambridge Dictionary) 'Copy' here is a noun meaning text in a newspaper or other printed item. A newspaper reporter trying to 'raise ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
2 votes
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What does "lose blunt" mean?

It is archaic slang for money. Wiktionary: (UK, slang, archaic, uncountable) money Charles Dickens, chapter 10, in The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, published 1837: Down he goes to the ...
James K's user avatar
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2 votes
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Usage of "to take a chance(on something)"

We decided to {plan to hold the party outside} knowing that it might be the wrong choice (because of the weather). The only difference between "take a chance" and "take a chance on {...
James K's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

You're to stake your pile on Speedy

From Merriam-Webster, usage 4 of 6, meaning 3: a great amount of money : FORTUNE.
Andy Bonner's user avatar
2 votes

Politicians talk too much

As @James K explains, it is a play on Chicago’s nickname, The Windy City, based on its particular weather, and on the metaphor of wind for (excessive) talk. Some other examples of this metaphor, which ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes

Why we say “thank you very much” after good news

It's common to use "thank you" sarcastically to denote that either (i) someone has given you something you didn't want and you don't really feel thankful, or (ii) that someone has failed to ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
2 votes

"Social men" who have entered the real world and experienced lots of social challenges and complexities?

A phrase which matches your description is "man of the world" someone who has a lot of experience of life and can deal with most situations This is not very common in modern talk but does ...
dubious's user avatar
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2 votes

In for a penny, in for a pound

Let's start with the usual meaning of the expression. Pounds and pence (pennies) are the units of currency of the United Kingdom. The penny is the smaller unit, with 100 pennies to the pound, just as ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 105k
2 votes
Accepted

"Premise on" [which] vs. "Premise with" [which]

Either is fine for the premise which acts as a starting point, although "on" is more common and a bit more precise. You're really taking "on the premise" or "with the premise&...
Stuart F's user avatar
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1 vote

to paint someone (other than oneself) "into a corner"

to paint oneself into a corner is the idiomatic expression. To paint [x] into a corner is also an idiomatic expression. BUT: They painted us into a corner. That works too. He painted me into a corner. ...
Lambie's user avatar
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1 vote

Why we say “thank you very much” after good news

McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions includes this entry: thank you very much phr. a (sometimes sarcastic) tag added to a statement for emphasis. (Often used when ...
gotube's user avatar
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1 vote
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Which does "go down" mean, digest or swallow?

Neither. It means be easily swallowed. Note that this construction uses the passive voice, whereas your second proposed meaning uses the active.
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

pinch out vs. peter out

The correct geological term of art is pinch out. Here's some text from some geology modeling software called Seequent: Improved pinch-out behaviour – Previously, if a drillhole did not contain valid ...
TimR on some device's user avatar
1 vote

Combinig past and present tenses together

'Now' can be used used when talking or writing about past events, to describe a new situation or event - the weather became so bad that a new situation arose (further outdoor exercise was now ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar
1 vote

Which do you use to refer to the piled up stuff of a hoarder when you see them all at once: "that all" VS "it all" VS "those all" VS "all those"

I'm going to assume you mean "stuff" instead of "staff". "all that" would be applicable no matter what the pile of stuff included, but "all those" is sort of ...
TKoL's user avatar
  • 141
1 vote

"get the answer right" what's the part of speech of 'right' here?

Eventually, nearly everyone in the class gets the answer right, and the concepts stick with them because they had to find their own way to the answer. In that sentence the word right is an adjective....
Marios Athanasiou's user avatar
1 vote

(How) can I say 'state of the [non-art]'?

A term occasionally used in contrast to 'state-of-the-art' is 'state-of-the-practice'. It would refer to something that has been standardized and in line with 'best practices', as opposed to ...
andorov's user avatar
  • 111
1 vote
Accepted

Is there a phrase like "there is always a tea shop set up earlier"?

To be honest, the entire article is a little stilted, but just about manages to get away with it. Neither quoted sentence is particularly idiomatic, but the overall intent seems reasonably clear. The ...
DoneWithThis.'s user avatar

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