Hot answers tagged

4 votes
Accepted

Using "beyond the pale"?

There is a similar sounding expression "beyond the veil" meaning "in a mysterious or hidden place or state". It seems to me that this author is mixing up "beyond the pale&...
user avatar
  • 154k
2 votes

Do recursive stories exist in English?

I'm aware of a short cyclic story (no idea of the original source): It was a dark and stormy night and the sailors said to the Captain, "Captain, tell us a story" and so he began, "It ...
user avatar
2 votes

Do recursive stories exist in English?

We have songs that end where they started: a cycle song The most famous is probably: There's a Hole in the Bucket "A circle song is one that comes back to where it started and begins again. It ...
user avatar
  • 36.1k
2 votes

Is it correct to say "our plan to go public" vs "to be out for public"?

Our plan to make our services available to the public is ready. Our plan to make our services available to the market is ready. Our plan to sell our services to the public is ready. Three options. ...
user avatar
  • 36.1k
2 votes

Using "beyond the pale"?

beyond the pale Origin The origin of “beyond the pale” goes back to the 14th century in England and Ireland. The four eastern counties of Meath, Louth, Dublin, and Kildare were the “obedient shires” ...
user avatar
  • 36.1k
2 votes

Meaning of "within a period of not more than one month preceding the date of expiry"?

'A period' is a certain length of time - here dictated as 'one month'. 'Not more than one month' means pretty well 'one month or less'. 'Preceding' is coming before, and October is preceded by ...
user avatar
  • 482
2 votes

what's the meaning of "hang on like a loose garment" in the context?

Loose clothing is a poor fit. And it is easily taken off and replaced with some other clothing. It also shows that the wearer has taken little care in selecting the clothing. The author is saying that ...
user avatar
  • 425
1 vote

confusion over the meaning of 'shock, horror'

Apparently the phrase is British slang, but I'm British and I rarely ever hear it so do not worry. From what I can gather, "shock horror" is an idiom that basically points out kind of ...
user avatar
1 vote

confusion over the meaning of 'shock, horror'

Many things can be said sarcastically. This is not a special feature of English, the same is true in your language. When something is said sarcstically it has the opposite meaning to its literal ...
user avatar
  • 154k
1 vote
Accepted

What does "Though few, if any," mean?

It is not "Though few, if any, figures" which you should Parse. The Parsing is "Though [few, if any], figures". Here we may take : "few, if any" = "some small ...
user avatar
  • 516
1 vote

What does "Though few, if any," mean?

You are partly right. The sentence that is puzzling you doesn't refer to 'him' (the prison escapee) at all. You don't give the source of the quotation, so the connection between the two sentences isn'...
user avatar
  • 32.6k
1 vote

Using "beyond the pale"?

A pale is a stake or a post — it comes from the same root word as “pole” and “impale” — and it came to mean any area separated off by a fence. The phrase “beyond the pale” means “beyond the bounds of ...
user avatar
1 vote

"less than" with math symbol?

If you are writing an academic paper, use the mathematical expression Y=X-D. If you are talking relatively casually you might say "Y" is "D" less than "X", or "The ...
user avatar
  • 154k
1 vote

"less than" with math symbol?

How about literally transcribing the equation? Y is/equals X minus D And if you're writing an academic paper, the readers shouldn't be surprised by seeing formulas. You don't always need to 'type ...
user avatar
  • 14.6k
1 vote
Accepted

"less than" with math symbol?

If each variable represents something, you should refer to what it represents. For example: Suppose every item on sale has a designated discount amount for VIP customers. If X represents the ...
user avatar
  • 2,823
1 vote

Is it correct to say "our plan to go public" vs "to be out for public"?

To go public is definitely right. Cambridge defines it as to make something known that was secret before: We will not go public with the results until tomorrow. OxfordL's definition is also helpful ...
user avatar
  • 8,308
1 vote
Accepted

"What was all that about" usage

As a British English speaker, I find "What was that all about?" perfectly normal, after something said or done that I find inexplicable, either as a direct question to the sayer or doer, or, ...
user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible