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35

No, it does not quite get the meaning you want. "Under" could only be used with "water." The way you have your sentence means that there is a limitation of the word "under." That is, the only place you could use "under" would be with "water." That is, you are saying you can't use "under penalty of law" or "under duress" or "under budget." You might try ...


3

It is entirely idiomatic to refer to a "nice answer", or indeed a "nice" anything, to mean 'good according to the relevant criteria'. So a nice answer is clear and helpful, a nice cake is tasty, a nice town has low crime and pleasant buildings, a nice dress has attractive fabric and a flattering cut, etc. In fact, it is so commonplace to use "nice" as a ...


2

Who should I say is calling is asking the name of the person is calling. If you are asking for the name of the person that the person calling wants to talk to, you say To whom do you want to speak?


2

Let's rearrange the clauses in the sentence into a simpler form, and then build back up to the more complicated form you're asking about. Alice is calling - simple statement of an action in progress I will say (that) Alice is calling - an additional clause to describe what I will do in response to the initial action. When I tell someone about the phone ...


2

You are correct. It would mean an unassuming person who keeps to themselves and goes about their life without making a fuss.


2

Your context is important. If you are engaged in an online discussion or email exchange, I think it is fine to say "pre-covid". In a formal situation, such as an academic paper, you could say something like, "Before the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic..."


1

The phrase "leg before wicket" seems to be cricket jargon See: Wikipedia "leg before wicket" "Leg before wicket (lbw) is one of the ways in which a batter can be dismissed in the sport of cricket. Following an appeal by the fielding side, the umpire may rule a batter out lbw..." So, "given out" means the batter was ruled "out", or dismissed from ...


1

To close the stable door after the horse has bolted is pretty much the same as the Vietnamese one you offer. I would say it is slightly stronger than your definition of "doing things when it happened, without preparation" in that it also implies your response is too late to have any effect at all, and therefore ultimately pointless. Without straying too ...


1

I assume that the preceding sentence reveals some new information that should cause you to change your opinion of the topic. Metaphorically, the topic is now dressed in (wears) different clothing, which alters its appearance (aspect). Later: I wrote this answer before the asker added the paragraph in which the sentence appears. I would change it only to ...


1

Yes, you can use it that way. Since "head first" is a metaphor suggesting physical movement, the verb in your sentence could be "dove", staying within the metaphor. "He dove headfirst into his new business."


1

Suppose someone calls on the phone and asks to speak to, for example, Bob. You could yell, "Hey, Bob, someone on the phone for you!" But it's considered polite to give him a little more information. You'd like to be able to say, "Sally is on the phone for you." So you want to ask the caller to identify themselves. Thus you ask, "Who should I say is calling?" ...


1

on the phone, you could use the expression "should I say who's calling" to ask the speaker if they'd like you to announce their name to others (who might be present there.) imagine this scenario someone calls you, and leaves a message for your brother but they they feel like your brother knowing who left the message is irrelevant and unimportant, so in ...


1

The verb bang means to hit something with force, so you are right to think "banged on the hammer" means that he hit the hammer with something, which doesn't make much sense. However, the word on here is not used to indicate the object of preposition (for example chisel), as a matter of fact it's not even a preposition in the fist place, it's an article, so ...


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