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6

It all depends on the context in which you use this term. 1) Trap Queen might refer to a song by Fetty Wap She my trap queen And in that case Trap is a place where drugs are sold. 2) A girl with large trapezius muscles. Look at that girl hitting the gym, she's a real trap queen 3) the person is a queen for traps, with traps meaning boys dressing up ...


4

This study refers to them as casual smokers or social smokers: We investigated how adolescents define different smoker types (nonsmoker, smoker, regular smoker, addicted smoker, heavy smoker, experimental smoker, casual smoker, and social smoker) using multiple indicators of smoking behaviors, including frequency, amount, place, and length of time ...


4

According to the idiom dictionary: from the top From the very beginning. Used in reference to the performance of something, especially a song. No, no, no—you're still coming in too early with that high note, James. Let's take it again from the top, everyone! I think this is a much fuller definition. "From the top" sounds like it ...


3

get up (one's) nerve (to do something) - To muster or draw upon one's courage or resolve to do something. The Free Dictionary In your context, the mother doesn't have the courage to tell her children what is on her mind (presumably because it's bad and she doesn't want to upset/disturb their play). Fairly common idiom (at least in BrE). Edit to answer ...


3

The "is a" portion used in the first example indicates that "pre" is a noun, and I am inclined to think you are correct that it is short for "prerequisite". Of course, the example also includes "(Must)" which should indicate the same thing, so there is a lack of internal consistency. In the second example, however, the "pre" category is contrasted with "...


3

In brief, use "numerous" for "many", and "innumerable" for "too many". Numerous means there are many: I own numerous pairs of socks Innumerable means "so many that they can't be counted". "Innumerable" is used for larger numbers than "numerous" There are so many beetles in the world that they are innumerable. This second word is often used for ...


3

The expression up in the air is a good example. Depending on context, an alternative could be: At a crossroads From Vocabulary.com: crossroads (n.) a point in time when a critical decision must be made For example: We are at a crossroads and don't know which path to take as the potential results are uncertain.


3

I think the term 'bragging rights' is pretty common and most native English speakers would know what you mean. Playing for bragging rights means that the only thing the winner will get out of winning, is to say to everyone that they won. They are playing for the right to talk highly about their winning.


2

This phrase is exclusively used as slang (slang from AAVE as far as I can tell), so it's exact meaning can be hard to define. urban dictionary has several entries, and a lot of them have somewhat opposite meanings. In general though: A witty or street-smart female, usually with an urban flavor or appeal, who is loyal (potentially to a fault) and ...


2

To "keep something/someone in the know" means to have information which is not accessible by everyone. So if you are reading a book about programming, then keeping your objects in the know would mean, that you probably should keep their information secret from the outside, but known to each other. Source.


2

Merriam-Webster has an entry for the idiom keep tabs on: informal : to carefully watch (someone or something) in order to learn what that person or thing is doing // We are keeping tabs on their movements. // The magazine keeps tabs on the latest fashion trends. It does not have an entry for keep a tab on. Google Books Ngram Viewer also indicates ...


2

"well worth the ride" can be used in regard to any metaphorical journey. I have seen it used with the classic metaphor of life as a journey: A fulfilled life is well worth the ride. Such a use is not a mixed metaphor. (Not that there is anything wrong with a mixed metaphor when it communicates well. "To take arms against a sea of troubles, and by ...


2

"Nerve" has the meaning of "courage" in this example, as noted in the answer above. My mother was feeling very bad as she sat on the couch looking at all of her children, but she didn't have the courage to tell us what was on her mind.


1

As an American, yes, I would consider the phrase to be associated with both BE and out of date. We might even use it when doing an impression in jest of an old British gentleman. I think in this case it's being used to denote that what follows it is something which should not be said (because it's rude, scandalous, improper, impolite, etc.), but is being ...


1

It's not unnatural to mix metaphors. It's just a questionable writing choice. For example: If we want to get ahead we'll have to iron out the remaining bottlenecks. This is a mix of "iron out the kinks (wrinkles)" and "work through the bottlenecks", that doesn't make literal sense, but nevertheless the intent is obvious. It's better when ...


1

You need to study hard, many years; it’s a long way up, but well worth the ride I think this is another idiomatic way of saying well worth your while From collinsdictionary.com: worth your while - If an action or activity is worth someone's while, it will be helpful, useful, or enjoyable for them if they do it, even though it requires some effort


1

I feel it's something people 50+ would be more likely to say. To me it means "experience", but at least one person in New Zealand who heard me use it thought I was referring to prostitution...


1

"Pull one's weight", or in some cases, "do one's share" is a relatively informal and common expression. It's perfectly natural in a casual conversation about the relative efforts of various members of a team, who work together on a common task. It can be used as a "buzzword" (or "buzzphrase", I suppose) when talking about an employee's individual effort. ...


1

"Reconstruction" is probably the most accurate term, or as a verb "reconstruct". "Rebuild" is a close synonym. If you are not building again you can say "development". Redevelopment tends to be used for the new development in a poor, but not destroyed area The reconstruction of Mosel after the Iraq war included the rebuilding of the Great Mosque of al-...


1

It's a little specific, but 'regenerating' is currently the most used phrase in this sort of context, particularly when you are talking about residential areas. 'Gentrification' is similar, but with heavy negative connotations.


1

Used that way, "come to" is an idiom, that is an expression whose meaning is not immediately obvious from the dictionary meaning of the words. This idiom is used for emphasising how bad a situation is and how shocked or upset you are about it. e.g. "You wonder what is has come to when children are starving in our country". Not all English phrases are ...


1

"Pocket money" is the small amounts of money that parents give to their children, to give them independence to buy snacks or toys. Jonny got £5 pocket money a month, and he had been saving it up all year to buy himself a new computer game. You seem to mean that the person is using their savings: After he quit his job, Jonny had to live off his savings ...


1

You are looking for the phrase "Out of Pocket" I have to live out-of-pocket for two years just for a reason that doesn't sound logical to my family members and whoever knows me and my background.


1

"I have to pay out of my own pocket..."


1

Many people will probably think they mean exactly the same thing, but personally I think adjectival well-to-do best carries the specific allusion to OP's request for a terms that includes "comfort and luxury, with all needed facilities at hand". To my mind, the similar term well-off is much more tightly focused on actual wealth. It's worth citing this ...


1

The common phrase is "a rich family". You might also say "a wealthy family" or "a prosperous family". They mean the same thing.


1

In the specific example where you make a reasonable request to someone with the power to help you, but, while the person does not actually refuse the request, neither do they act on the request in a timely manner. When you ask them why, they give only useless or evasive answers. In this case, we would call this a stonewall or stonewalling: stonewall (...


1

I suspect the phrase you are referring to it singing along Examples I am singing along with the song He is singing along with the song They are singing along with the song. I sang along with the song (past tense) They sang along with the song


1

To be "right (or not right) in the head" is almost a set expression. "Messed up in the head" also works, but in general I can't think of other adjectives that can be combined with "in the head" in this way. "In one's head" is a prepositional phrase which constrains the action of the sentence to the realm of mental thought. You described it pretty much ...


1

"Saving your reverence" was specifically an apology for using taboo language in front of a high-ranking priest, and the other similar forms were for using such language in front of some other person who might be supposed to be especially offended. I recall it being used in novels from the 1920s, and put in the mouth of a character with rather old-fashioned ...


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