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13

In someone's face roughly means in front of someone's face, but it can have an aggressive connotation: in (one's) face 1. Physically in front of one's face. If you stick that dead bug in my face, I'm going to come after you! Can you believe he just slammed the door in my face like that? (TFD) From just tells us the person's origin, so to ...


11

What you have here, I believe, is called a Group Genitive (see Collins). See the third section for more on this. Meaning in Context: From Cambridge, a bloke is "a man, often one who is considered to be ordinary." This is used informally. See sheila. In your case, Harry is saying that he saw Gaunt waving (= brandishing) the ring "in the face of a ...


7

The cause of the confusion in this sentence is that the speaker doesn't recall the name of the person he is speaking about. The person's actual name in the story is Bob Ogden. Let us therefore reconstruct the sentence with that information: I saw him waving it in Bob's face, he nearly shoved it up his nose! This sentence is much simpler. It simply means ...


3

The construction "in the bloke from the Ministry's face" feels awkward because the posessive is so far from the owning noun. If it were "in the face of the bloke from the Ministry" it'd be less ambiguous but it'd feel more stilted. "Waving it in the Minister's face" might be inaccurate if it's a low-level official. For an informal, young speaker like Ron, ...


2

I want to work my way across the USA has two potential meanings, depending on context. One is I want to travel from one side of the USA to the other while working at various jobs along the way to pay for the trip. It is similar to the meaning of "I worked my way through college." The other meaning is I want to travel across the USA without a fixed ...


2

Among many other things, October 1 is Nigeria's Independence Day, marking Nigeria's independence from British colonial rule in 1960. This is a day of celebration, so "living every day like it's the 1st of October" suggests the speaker likes to party, or to treat each day as a celebration of life. Another line from this remix of the song supports this: I'...


2

No, I think you are on the wrong track. The idiom is any the X-er (where X can be certain adjectives or adverbs) means to any degree X-er. It is not particularly common, and any the wiser seems to be by far the most common example. Examples (from the iWeb corpus): But would they be any the happier for that? (Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, 1932) ...


1

It might not be exact, but there’s the expression you have to do what you have to do: You got to do what you got to do One has to do whatever it is that one feels obliged to do. I know I wouldn't ever agree to that kind of thing, but you got to do what you got to do. (TFD) It’s also spoken as you gotta do watcha gotta do. I don’t think it exactly ...


1

There are a few similar English expressions you could use in various circumstances: (It's hard work, but) somebody's got to do it. (~ Jemand muss es tun.) You do what you have/need to do. (~ Man tut was mann tun muss.) X won't Y itself. (The kids won't raise themselves. The bills won't pay themselves.)


1

In Australian English, particularly Sydney street/jail slang, it definitely means something very different; if Mr White got got for his crimes, then Mr White would be bleeding to death on a prison yard somewhere. Full of puncture wounds, probably also badly bruised. And nobody saw a thing.


1

I know I used to be selfish, but I'm not like that anymore. ^ That is correct and sounds natural. I know I used to be selfish, but I'm not such anymore. ^ That is not correct use, it sounds "wrong" but it is intelligible - a listener will know what you mean. You could say: I know I used to be, but I'm not such a selfish person anymore. In that ...


1

I would certainly not say hand to hand, as that implies unarmed combat. However, I also wouldn't say that buying something face to face is a natural expression either. Instead, this would be a far more natural dialogue: "Did you order it from him on the phone?" "No, I bought it from him in person." Alternatively, you could say that something is an in-...


1

No - "hand to hand" has a different meaning, and refers to a kind of fighting, ie hand-to-hand combat. "Changing hands" is a term used to describe the sale of something from one person to another, but is mostly used to describe the sale of businesses themselves rather than goods. The term "second-hand sales" also refers to the sale of pre-owned goods. Any ...


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