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32

This is an example of "playground language". It is the sort of thing that boys might say on the school playground, when they think no adults can hear them. It is a childish insult. Saying "something rules" means you think that thing is great. This is a fairly common slang. I love Game of Thrones. I think it rules. On the other hand, to "drool" is when ...


29

While "literally" and "in the true sense of the word" can mean essentially the same thing, they do not both always suit the same situations and are not interchangeable in the same sentence structure. For example, I would probably not say: He's literally a gentleman. This is because "gentleman" has more than one "literal" meaning - one dictionary ...


10

I would use the term independently wealthy, though I don’t think it’s considered an idiom: (of a person) Possessing enough wealth that one does not need financial support from another person and does not require income from employment. -YourDictionary


10

The phrase set for life was the first that came to my mind. It doesn't necessarily imply making a lot of money, but with some additional words you can make some idiomatic phrases. If you make it big on Broadway, you'll be set for life. You'd be set for life if you'd invested in the month after their IPO. Another possibility is to strike it rich. ...


10

spare the rod, spoil the child Said to derive from the Book of Proverbs, here is the King James Version which was printed in 1611. “He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes.” In these more liberal and compassionate times, it's not such a popular proverb as it was maybe 50 or 60 years ago, but I'd say it is ...


6

A word that fits both of your examples naturally and with your intended meaning is "genuinely". In the first case probably more idiomatic is "He's a real gentleman."


4

The idiomatic expression is in your question: His voice has broken. Dictionary definition


4

If it's not one thing, it's another. From The Idioms: if it’s not one thing, it’s the other also if it’s not one thing, it’s another or it’s one thing after another Meaning: everything is going wrong bad things keep happening face many problems in succession


4

It never rains but it pours it never rains but it pours C.E.D. UK saying (According to C.E.D. the U.S. version is when it rains, it pours) ​ said when one bad thing happens, followed by a lot of other bad things that make a bad situation worse


4

I can't address the idiom "make a pile" as I am not familiar with it, but maybe some else can. Here's what came to mind for me: make it (big) infml to become famous or successful: By the time he was nineteen, he had made it big in the music business. (Cambridge Dictionary) make it big To achieve great success and/or fame. My dream is ...


4

I'd use the phrase to make one's fortune, which means to become wealthy. (None of the references spell it out, but I've always heard it in reference to making enough that money is no longer a concern.  Of course, people who make a fortune through their own efforts are rarely the sort to stop working at that point, but I'd certainly assume that to be an ...


4

No, "getting ages" is completely wrong here. If you were asking a group of people to tell you their ages so you could write them down - for example, if you were conducting a survey - and someone asked you what you were doing, you might casually say: What are you doing? I'm getting ages. This is totally different than what you're tying to say. There ...


3

As you say, make a pile simply means that you have made, or are making, a lot of money: it doesn't carry any implications that you don't need any more money. Once you have reached the stage where earning any more wouldn't make any difference to you, you could use the informal expression filthy rich. Note that, while anymore is acceptable as a single word ...


3

Wiktionary gives the translation "orbiter", "A person who constantly hangs around with someone they are attracted to, but too shy to talk to." Alternatively, if I have misunderstood, a "Sugar daddy" is typically an older man who buys gifts for a younger woman. "A man who spends money for the benefit of a relationship with an often younger romantic or sexual ...


3

You original sentence could use some punctuation tweaks. Get a punch-above-your-weight mug for your mother-in-law, Helena! or Get a "punch above your weight" mug for your mother-in-law, Helena! In either case, you are probably suggesting that Helena get a mug that has the sentence "punch above your weight" inscribed on it. In general, the meaning ...


2

While your example: He came down on me on the argument I made against her. would I think be understood, I don't think it is the usual way that idiom would be employed. More likely would be: He came down on me about the argument I made against her. He came down on me over the argument I made against her. He came down on me for the argument I ...


2

F*** You Rich is one used in internet circles. The definition can be described as "So wealthy that you can say F*** You with no cause for concern or fear of financial reprisal". As one comment notes, this is also sometimes called F**k you money. A 2016 article at Money.com reads: In some circles, the wealth required to burn any bridge you want has a ...


2

"Financially independent" is a common term for this. Specifically, it means that you don't depend on anyone else for your money, because you have enough money yourself. The term is sometimes encountered in the idiom "Financial Independence Retirement Early", or FIRE (see this blog, e.g.). That seems to match the exact example you gave, so: "He achieved ...


2

To be 'at a loss' means 'to not to know what to do or say', e.g. 'I'm at a loss to know how I can help you', 'it was unlike him to be at a loss for words'. It is followed by words specifying what the speaker cannot say or does not know, for example at a loss for words, at a loss to explain something, etc. It is unusual to just say 'at a loss' with nothing ...


2

"The devil knows what" is the equivalent of "who knows what" (that is, something whose identity or nature is inadequately unspecified), intensified by using "the devil", a curse—which has already been noted as characteristic Ivan Nikiforovich's speech. Paraphrase: "It is rude of you to offer me something whose value is completely unknown for my ...


2

The closest I can think of off hand to the sort of feeling it sounds like you're going for is: Good fences make good neighbors. It implies fairly strongly that the speaker believes that the best way to get along with other people is to not be too close to them, but also that it's important to try to maintain good relations with those around you. It's ...


2

The first four proverbs are similar and can apply to the situation. The last one isn't relevant, as your link says Absence makes the heart grow fonder When people we love are not with us, we love them even more. I venture some more: A still tongue makes a wise head. A man is known by the company he keeps. Keep your friends close, but ...


2

That is not a bad translation back into English, but I think the meaning is more "to keep track of crime that had been done against ...". In other words they were monitoring communications to pick up on any of their citizens who had fallen victim to the local criminals.


2

By and large is not really a synonym for the other two. It means "generally speaking" or "for the most part." It implies that whatever is about to be said is mostly true over a large number of cases, but there are probably unimportant exceptions. By and large, kids don't like pink lemonade. There are lots and lots of kids out there, and the ones that ...


2

I'm fairly certain it just means a mug with a punch above your weight slogan on it You're also spot on with the meaning of that in this particular case.


2

"Literally" means that while your statement could be interpreted as hyperbole or being figurative, you're saying that you wish to convey the true meaning of the word. e.g. A man blames who blames a heart attack on stress due to problems with his wife might say, "she literally broke my heart!" Your two examples don't really fit, although the gentleman ...


2

"Literally" is misused frequently. More often than the current whipping boy "forte" which means loud. "Fort" is strength. The two lions at the entrance to a certain library are named...? Anyway, literally is not an emphasis word, it's the true meaning of something. Consider: If Bob is not very smart, saying he's "literally a rock!" out of frustration ...


2

Well, if you are aware that something is Indian English, be cautious using it before the English speaking community. Though some InE expressions (such as 'kindly do the needful'; 'picturization of something') are now at least understood if not well accepted, they still have some grey area to improve. Again, you are correct! I want to make friendship ...


1

"Roll on the summer vacation!" is an exclamation where "roll on" is an interjection expressing anticipation. The meaning and one of the possible ways to rephase it is "I can't wait for my summer vacation to begin!" or "(My)Summer vacation, come soon(-er)!" The source. Also, see here.


1

How about: Summer vacation couldn't come sooner. or Summer vacation can't come soon enough!


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