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35

“Society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they know they shall never sit in.” I would say this quote gets across the same meaning. That is it is more important that successes be push forward to future generations, and not just enjoyed by the previous ones.


32

The maxim reminds you that your future is your children … There's the following expression: We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children. According to Quote Investigator, this current form of the expression—which is now commonly use, originated in a different form by Wendell Berry in the book The Unforeseen Wilderness: An ...


5

Though not a proverb, there is a famous attributed to Abraham Lincoln which is along the same lines: "I don't know who my grandfather was; I am much more concerned to know what his grandson will be." So that is to say, the quality of the descendant is more important than that of the ancestor.


4

Western culture in general is less prone to ancestor-worship than the Chinese culture. And at least until recently, the above maxim would not have even been considered. The "English way" has always traditionally been that it is the duty of the children to continue the dynasty of one's father. The more recent tradition where one is now supposed to pour ...


3

Though much less specific, the phrase Pay it forward (in contrast to Pay it back) is in a similar spirit.


3

As a native speaker, I agree with Colin Fine and wouldn't use this. Learn the ropes is defined as: If you learn the ropes, you learn how to do a particular job or task. It isn't really used in relation to a new language/subject. I would say: I’m going to Canada to study and start my learning experience in English, learning experience indicates you are ...


2

I think the descriptions are very clear. Leg pulling is always humorous deception.


2

The offer is to work for a sorcerer. The response is a suggestion that he might provide someone with the sorcerer's flesh for food -- cooked on a hot skillet with beans as a dish -- a very cynical and forceful rejection.


2

A sentiment I have heard is something like Our parents were (factory workers/miners/farmers) so we could be (doctors/lawyers/businessmen), and we are (doctors/lawyers/businessmen) so our children can be (authors/artists/poets). (With all kinds of different potential stand-ins for the various generations, but generally with a progression from “manual labor” ...


1

You keep dropping out.............The line keeps dropping out.


1

An idiom in English is "Hobson's choice" It means "there is only one option available". It is said to have originated from Thomas Hobson who hired horses to customers. Instead of letting the customer choose the horse, he only let them have the horse nearest the stable door (or none at all). We might use it as "The patent law leaves ...


1

As an American English speaker I've heard this construction many times in situations having nothing to do with sexual orientation. However, the usage for all situations seems to be shortened to "come out," and used in a humorous or tongue-in-cheek way, as if the issue being discussed is as "shameful" as coming out as LGBTQ was (or still ...


1

There are possibly a number of idioms, but the one that springs to mind is to "err on the side of grace". This means to overlook errors rather than harshly judge them in situations where you are torn between the two. It is perhaps a corruption of "err on the side of caution", which means to be careful when undecided about a matter. ...


1

A quote from David O. McKay says, No worldly success can compensate for failure in the home. However, unlike the quote mentioned by Jason Bassford, this is not as common a saying, I think. It also doesn't necessarily mean or include secular success.


1

Not being a Brit, my understanding of 'roll on' is based mainly on reading, television, movies, etc. My favorite example is from Raymond Briggs' book Father Christmas. The title character is sitting on a snowy rooftop having a lunch break from delivering presents and listening to a terrible weather forecast on his portable radio - more snow, wind, blizzards, ...


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