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26

It's an idiom. It means "He knows who each person is". It suggests that Walter knows the importance of the role of each person, not just their name. He knows who is important and who is not important. It is used as the name of a dictionary of important people, published each year since 1860. You'll also hear "what's what" (what is ...


12

As others said, it's an idiom meaning "knows who each person is". It can be understood this way: Who's - an abbreviation for "who is". So the phrase expands to "they know who is who". The thing is, that the word "who" can be used in several ways, signifying subtly different things. We often use "who" ...


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"Consider as", in this sense, is considered redundant. American Heritage Dictionary consider To think or deem to be; regard as: considered his friend a liberal on most issues; considered her contribution essential. See Usage Note at as 1. This is the relevant part of the usage note referred to above: American Heritage Dictionary as As is ...


3

Yes, it's a bit of an archaic phrasing, in my opinion still relatively common because of the rhyme "A friend in need is a friend indeed", i.e. "Someone that's a friend to you when you need help is a real friend". "A friend in need" referring to them as the person in need would be more natural these days, and it still causes ...


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I've never heard "return to the well" used in this way before. I would assume you're right that "the well" is some fictional place or state of being that is specific to the lore of the comic's world. I will note that "return to the well" is a common metaphorical idiom in English, meaning roughly "try to again use that ...


2

It's the shirt you "button up", not the buttons. So "button it up" refers to the shirt (singular) not the buttons (however many or few) there are of them.


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I would say it means Walter knows who every person is "who's" = meaning person "Who's who" = knows the persons name and other details such as saying "we need to identify who's who" said the cop


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The phrase “this much” is an idiom when used in a phrase like “I know this much is true”, so there isn’t a literal parsing that captures the meaning. The definition in the Free Dictionary explains it as: phrase used to indicate a minimal but definite piece of information. We can use it in many different ways—“know this much” and “say this much” are fairly ...


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Not 'exclusively' British Animal Kingdom and Shackleford are little more than the best of a bad bunch of 3-year-old thoroughbreds. New York Times, June 11 2011 Houston Rockets: 1976-95 home The problem with the Rockets' history of jerseys is finding a kit that doesn't look like a promotional tool for a certain red-and-yellow-themed fast-food restaurant. The ...


1

Yes the usage of the word "trap" and the idiom "fall into the trap" sound totally fine to my native speaker ears. See also: https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/fall+into+the+trap+of+(doing+something) and: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fall-into-the-trap-of-doing-something


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If you're sharing a cake with someone and you say "I would like this much", you're telling them how much of the cake you would like. If you say "This much is true", then you're saying that some amount of something is true, probably there's a number of things that might be true, and you're sure some of them are. Hence, "I know this ...


1

No-one has answered your question 'Is that an idiom?' We walk [a]round with this fear is just a way of saying We pass our daily lives fearing that... It has a meaning other than the literal one, so, yes, it could be described as an idiom.


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It's not a typo, she clearly said "round", and it's very common in British English. Fans were milling round the hotel lobby hoping to see the film star. Meanwhile, photographers were standing round chatting to each other. When you read sentences like these you know that the author is probably English or one who favours (pun intended) British ...


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DailyWritingTips has a great article on this right here. From DailyWritingTips: One of the differences between American and British English is the usage of the words round and around. Americans use around in contexts in which most British speakers prefer round.


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Haven't watched the video, but from the quote it would be the same as what Merriam Webster describes as 'flip the script': flip the script informal : to achieve an outcome or adopt an approach that is opposite to or completely different from what has happened or been done previously The tagline to the video on YouTube mentions: Humility, transparency and ...


1

It's flowery language, anthromorphising a meteor by suggesting that (like a royal personage appearing before the crowds) its appearance is graciously granting its viewers a view (with a little wave) before returning back into its private seclusion once more.


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Honestly I've only ever heard like a fish out of water used to describe someone who's not comfortable in a situation. I suppose you could use the opposite and hope people understand the contrast you're making, but "a fish in water" is the normal, usual, non-notable state of things, so it might not be clear what you're implying. Mike is in his ...


1

To say "He died a noun" means "He died while being a noun". So it makes sense "He died while being a poor man" or "He died while being a happy man". You could also say "He died while being a good teacher", but I don't think I would understand what that means. Does that mean he was in the act of teaching when ...


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