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54

The saying "Stop digging yourself into a hole" (or in this case "We should stop digging ourselves into a hole") seems to fit. It refers to someone who is already in a bad or awkward situation, and says they should stop making it worse. See: Wikipedia. "Stop while you're ahead" could be used if the situation has not yet become ...


20

Really, it could mean either. If you're talking about a person, it would mean the person is intelligent (this is the more common usage). But if you were talking about an organisation, it would mean they have many intelligent people. It depends on the context.


16

You might be interested in the phrase Cut your losses. From Oxford Languages (...the Google result): to abandon an enterprise or course of action that is clearly going to be unprofitable or unsuccessful before one suffers too much loss or harm. "an inner voice was urging her to cut her losses and go back to England" In your case, saying something ...


9

There's an idiom if you keep your mouth shut, you won't put your foot in it which means If you keep quiet, then you won't unintentionally say something foolish, tactless, or offensive. To describe a situation that's already awkward, you could say "take your foot out of your mouth". Here's a usage of this phrase in such a context. These come from ...


9

I guess the confusion is the use of the plural "brains". This is casual but idiomatic: Wiktionary gives: *(in the plural) Intellect. She has a lot of brains. So "Long on brains" means "having a great intellect", or "being very intelligent".


6

You can say I am short of time. or I am short on coffee. Be long on something then would convey the opposite meaning. It means you would have a good or large supply or endowment (10). We are long on corn. I think the problem we have is that we are long on generalities and short on specifics. As @James pointed out, "long on brains" means &...


5

The Macmillan dictionary tells you the idiom “You don’t say” has contradictory meanings. used to express surprise. used to express lack of surprise. This is because you can say “You don’t say that, do you?” in the both situations. Maybe you can call it a contranym, just like the word “virtual.”


4

Several good answers, and a bit more wordy sentiment might be: "Better to stay silent and thought a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt."


4

Saying "you're going to be an aunt/uncle" would definitely be a confusing thing to say to anyone other than a pregnant woman's siblings! However, it's pretty common for a child (and parents, in the child's presence) to refer to close family friends as "Aunt (name)" or "Uncle (name)" even when the friend is not actually related ...


4

"Let's call it a day" is an idiom, even a cliché. Meaning "Let us decide to end work now". It is productive enough that "Call it a week" is a natural development. People normally have a break from work at the weekend, analogous to the break from work overnight. It and has plenty of examples on the internet. It would be less ...


4

Good question. Fascinating NGram supporting Kate's comment about back in the day being a recent development. Google Ngram Back in The Day vs Back in the Days To some extent your sentences are not interchangeable. Your second sentence should read something like - Back in the days of paying rent, we had an apartment with a swimming pool. Which is like ...


2

It is commonly taught that the present perfect tense in English means "happened in the past but relevant in the present", but I think this is not quite right, as shown by your question. The present perfect indicates to the listener that you are thinking of the event in relation to a certain time interval, which begins somewhere in the past and ...


2

Another idiom is to "save face". To try to regain favorable standing after something embarrassing has happened; to give or afford someone an opportunity to avoid embarrassment, humiliation, or shame. For example: I was late to the meeting but tried to save face by blaming an urgent call. Though this leans more toward taking certain actions in ...


1

She's the apple of my eye. She's my pride and joy. Or even simply She's my daughter (emphasis on "daughter" rather than "my") could imply all the rest.


1

Does this mean 'be smart' or 'having many smart people? In American English, it’s a personal characteristic. To be “long on brains” means to have a lot of brain power (colloquially “brains”), but it is also part of a common idiom that implies that one is “long” on something (brain power, physical prowess, or some other characteristic) while being “short” in ...


1

"Brains" usually means just one smart brain because English is weird. We might say "Sue's got brains" to mean she's smart. Comparing a smart person to a strong one is "brains over brawn". It could be "brain over brawn" but if you Google, "brains over brawn" comes up more often. Or "ain't got the brains ...


1

The actual context is the 'dad joke'. Stereotypically dads make terrible puns or silly jokes with their kids, that are simple enough ('broad enough' in this context is the exact idiomatic expression) for 5 year olds to 'get' them. The 'Dad' part of it is, they can use those same silly, over obvious jokes on 12 year olds, who will groan and say, "Daaad!&...


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