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17

It means "everything is perfect", perhaps in way that is "too good to be true". I've not heard it before, but there are a number of other similar idioms: "everything is rainbows and butterflies" "everything is rainbows and unicorns" It is quite common for English speakers to make up their own version of this idiom, ...


7

You have the gist of it, it is meant to meant that everything is just great, peachy-keen, hunky-dory, etc. Side note: it's kind of an odd pairing. Moon-pies are typically considered a Southern comfort/junk food. So if the author was trying to give this a Southern feel, boiled peanuts would have made a better choice than salted peanuts as boiled peanuts are ...


3

There is the word “invaluable”, which literally means you can’t value something. A common idiom people use is to say you “can’t put a price on” something. For example: Though surrogate mothers are well paid, you really can’t put a price on the risks involved in pregnancy and delivery.


3

As others said in the comments, there is no need to worry about any sexual connotations of "in bed." You're talking to a child and you're clearly using in bed in its normal, literal sense. However, I find most of your proposed alternatives more idiomatic than "don't linger in bed." "Get up now," "hurry up" and "...


3

It means they said it about them. You see this when a quote is attributed to a person, but the quote doesn't specify who or what the quoted person was speaking about. In your example, the quote uses a pronoun "her", so it has to be made clear Trump said it about (or 'of') the federal judge. “Well I haven’t said it was her, but she’s outstanding,” ...


2

Said of her means he said something, and it was about her - she was the subject of the statement. It's a way to connect the reported speech with its subject. So yes, you're right!


2

As the other answers note, it's a reference to an album name from the movie This is Spinal Tap. I add a separate answer only to note: in English, it is not uncommon for an article, publication, etc. in some medium on some topic to refer to some essentially unrelated cultural work. It's not necessary for a reference to entirely "fit" the context. (...


1

Both of those expressions could be used, as could this one: She was drunk enough that it didn't have much impact on her. The expression "not much" means the impact was not great, and that includes the possibility that it had no impact on her at all, though it doesn't state that. You cant conclude that it "often" means "no impact"...


1

According to https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/run%20roughshod it means to completely ignore the opinions, rights, or feelings of others My guess is that the bathroom trolls love gems, and will hurt or dishonour others to get them.


1

"The risk is very high however many women agree to be surrogate mothers.They are well-paid but I think pregnancy and delivery can't be counted with money." I propose 'should not be equated with the money'. Also, 'pay well' as 'pregnancy and delivery' is the antecedent of the pronoun 'they'. Lastly, I add some punctuation signs. My suggestion is ...


1

B is saying that if getting a boyfriend is what is necessary for her not to have to drive, then that is (probably) not going to happen, and so A will still have to ride with B. "If that's what it takes" means "if that is what is necessary."


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