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8

Cambridge doesn't consider it as a set phrase, but it gives an example of it used in the literal sense under the entry of scab as noun: a hard covering of dry blood that forms over a cut or sore: Don’t pick at your scab! Urban simply states that it can be used figuratively, too. The phrase seems to be used more recently. Here is an example found in A ...


3

The phrase "hell of a (something)" only works in the singular form. When it comes to things like glasses or trousers, you have to make them singular in the same way you would if saying "one (something)." Specifically, you have one pair of glasses or of trousers. So: That's one hell of a pair of glasses.


3

Not a common expression, but an adaption of one. Saying "he has nothing between his ears" means "he has no brains" or "he is stupid". These girls have "nothing but cowslips", and the cowslip is a simple country flower. I'd understand this as meaning that these are simple country girls. They aren't idiots, but they ...


2

It means that they have something other than brains in their heads (they have flowers between their ears). In effect, she is saying that their idea is stupid.


2

Attributive modifiers of this sort are extremely common, though the ones in your examples are not headed by past participles - there are no corresponding verbs with the same interpretation: *We blood the veins. (make so that they have blood in them) *We billed our snowman. (made our snowman with a bill) *The composer noted his melody well. (make so that it ...


2

It is indeed just fine. Unless one is trying to be sarcastic this tells them that all will be well, or as perfect as can be expected. It does not mean adequate or barely sufficient.


2

"Having a high X game" does not sound idiomatic to this US English speaker. We usually say someone's game is strong, not high. For example, 7 Tips to Keep Your Selfie Game Strong This Actor’s Cartoon Game Is Strong (although this is also a pun on the fact that her last name is "Strong") My Girl Scout Cookie Game is STRONG We should ...


2

This is a special meaning of project: American Heritage Dictionary (Psychology) To attribute (one's own emotion or motive, for example) to someone else unconsciously in order to avoid anxiety or guilt. Merriam-Webster to attribute (one's own ideas, feelings, or characteristics) to other people or to objects The crimes don't have to be completely ...


2

I'm British, and I believe I have an ear for UK regional dialects, and I had never heard 'hoot' used in this way. I was ready to declare this, and be done, but a little imp said 'Google hoot speaker phone bank'. Industry is a TV show set in the finance sector. Mickey Down and Konrad Kay, the show's writers, were a bank analyst and an equity salesman ...


1

Verbs and nouns that collocate, like "have a shower" or "offer an apology", aren't considered idioms, so they don't get mentioned in dictionaries. The verb "pick" collocates with the noun "scab", so it's natural to use them together, but a dictionary wouldn't list the collocation. To "pick a scab" means to ...


1

As a native American English speaker, I think of the idiomatic adverb phrases just fine and perfectly well as near synonyms — both of which mean something like adequately or satisfactorily: Why use a big word when a small one works just fine? Why use a big word when a small one works perfectly well? Why use a big word when a small one works adequately? Why ...


1

I’d say they’re used interchangeably, but if you analyze them, they’re slightly different. To “leave someone hanging” I feel is more about walking away and leaving them to wonder while “keeping someone hanging” is more for when they’re holding on, waiting anxiously for an answer or something you’re withholding. I don’t think most people would analyze this, ...


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