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3 votes
Accepted

"He was 'happily married' with two young children." Can somebody explain to me the meaning of "happily married" in that sentence?

There is no mystery here. Just a little contextual interpretation. Married is an adjective, and you have the definition. In context I would understand "He" to mean the husband, and that &...
James K's user avatar
  • 195k
3 votes
Accepted

How does the phrase "to fall sway to [something]" work synctactically?

To fall sway to X is a very uncommon usage compared to fall under the sway of X... There's no doubt they mean exactly the same thing, but I see there are less than half-a-dozen written instances of ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes

Is there an idiom for "making someone reveal their secret"?

Draw it out of him/her/them is a phrase that can be used to describe the process of extracting information from someone when they are reluctant to reveal it. It somewhat connotes persistent attempts ...
Nuclear Hoagie's user avatar
2 votes

How does the phrase "to fall sway to [something]" work synctactically?

To "fall sway to X" means "to fall under the control or strong influence of X". The collocation is alive and well.
TimR's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Do the sentences "Yes, you did, very well so" and "Yes, you did so very well" have the same meaning?

Sentence 1 is simply wrong. The idion is "very much so", and is explained in the reference given in the comments. Sentence 2 is a valid sentence, but its meaning is slightly ambiguous. The ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

past tense after 'in order that'

[1] His group members tried several recipes and prepared all the ingredients in order that they made delicious sandwiches. Generally, "in order" is followed by either a finite that clause ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 15.4k
1 vote

Is it "a second nature" or "second nature"?

I wanted to say, Driving a car is like a second nature to me. But Google Docs and ChatGPT both corrected my sentence to: Driving a car is like second nature to me. So which is correct, and why do we ...
BigMistake's user avatar
1 vote

Is it "a second nature" or "second nature"?

I wanted to say, Driving a car is like a second nature to me. But Google Docs and ChatGPT both corrected my sentence to: Driving a car is like second nature to me. So which is correct, and why do we ...
BigMistake's user avatar
1 vote

Is there an idiom for "making someone reveal their secret"?

That idea is often expressed in terms of worming desired information out of someone. The somewhat unsavory associations of the word worm as a noun do deliver here some negative connotations (one might ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
1 vote

Is it grammatically correct to say "I don't feel a shred of sleepiness"

It is correct, but it is not a common way to express this sentiment, I'd usually go with one of the constructs afforded by not in the least.
Deipatrous's user avatar
1 vote

What may be said about someone who is a certain type of person, and who only seems to be so?

He is ever the gentleman. (UK usage.) Isn't he ever the gentleman. (...with a touch of irony.) He is quite the gentleman, isn't he? He is such a gentleman. (Informal.) He is gentleman in full. (...
Deipatrous's user avatar

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