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7 votes
Accepted

Does the proverb "having your cake and eating it too" imply hypocrisy?

You can't have your cake and eat it (too) just means ... one cannot have two incompatible things ... one should not try to have more than is reasonable ... you can't have it both ways ... you can't ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
4 votes

Does the proverb "having your cake and eating it too" imply hypocrisy?

Two ways to use the idiom. This idiom can be used in a positive or negative connotation: Ref. Cambridge dictionary have your cake and eat it too. idiom. to do or get two good things at the same time, ...
James Mathai's user avatar
2 votes

Does the proverb "having your cake and eating it too" imply hypocrisy?

Not inherently - that is to say, it isn't what the idiom means. But a context could arise where it is said about a hypocritical person. A hypocrite is one who claims to be something they are not, or ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
2 votes

'fight tooth and nail' - Can it be used for peaceful struggles?

"Fight tooth and nail" can be used metaphorically. A political campaign, a legal battle or a game of chess can all involve fighting "tooth and nail" if they are difficult and ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

What is the history of "break a leg", why It is used in English?

Wikipedia defines break a leg: Break a leg is an English language idiom used in the theatre or other performing arts to wish a performer "good luck". Several dictionaries give definitions ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

What does it mean "to have your feet on backwards"?

"a step backward" phrase meaning. Sometimes in speech, people don't remember the exact phrase and use other words, which would confuse the listeners. It might be a slip of the tongue. In ...
James Mathai's user avatar

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