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2

"In the red" (meaning lose money) or "in the black" (meaning make money), are common idioms. Being "in the red" indicates that you have a debt, but you expect, or hope, to make a profit later. It is normal for businesses to borrow money from the bank, with the intention of making a profit later. The company went into the red during the second quarter, but ...


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"How much are you in the red?" This is because losses are traditionally written with red ink on balance sheets, while "in the black" refers to making profits because positive amounts were written by black ink. "In the green" refers to possessing currency, rather than making profits or losses, as it refers to the color of American money.


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Also Don't send good money after bad You've already spent some money on the project (whatever it is), and you're not going to get it back -- that's the bad money. Don't send any more money after it -- that would be a waste of the good money.


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It's not exactly a proverb, but consider the expression "to cut one's losses," as in: It's time to cut your losses. Here the speaker is suggesting that the listener prevent ("cut") further or greater losses by stopping the activity that is causing them, even though to do so would also eliminate any chance of eventually regaining what was lost.


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Some people are never going to agree with you on this, so it's no use beating your head against a wall trying to convince everyone. I think the sentence makes perfect sense, and "it's no use" is a necessary part. As you have said, beating one's head against the wall is trying so much to do something (fruitlessly). So, it's no use trying so hard to do ...


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Actually, yes, that's what it means and I agree, it doesn't make much sense when taken literally. When this phrase is used it's usually to highlight the fact that nobody else is there to say goodbye to the person. They are alone in their departure and the writer wants to call attention to this fact without saying it literally. It emphasizes the solitude and ...


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The idiom I immediately thought of is look up to. From macmillandictionary.com: look up to someone to admire and respect someone He’s a role model for other players to look up to. You can also consider, view, see, have someone as a role model, or be a role model for/to someone. You're a role model someone follows, or copies, or imitates.


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There doesn't seem to a word which is an exact parallel and addresses all these cases and is in common usage, or even uncommon usage. Your phrase "an obvious example of" may be one of the best ways of conveying your precise meaning, though there are alternatives which would be much more natural in common English but aren't identical in their connotations. ...


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An often used phrase is textbook example or equivalently textbook case: : a classic, perfect case/example // The scandal is a textbook case/example of corporate greed. (source: Merriam-Webster) Of your other examples, typical is a good solution too, picture less so. I'd rather choose model, or the much more sophisticated word paragon: A person or ...


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"let's get down to business." does not indicate any particular friendliness. By expanding the contraction, as: Now, let us get down to business. there is a greater degree of formality, which might suggest lack of friendliness. I can see a lawyer saying this to a group of parties to which s/he is opposed, say. Even greater formality might be achieved ...


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Crossing the Rubicon?? Julius Caesar's return to Rome


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Head in the sky means to me, you're aware and know what’s around you but you don’t care because you're in your own element or just chilling in your own head. Connecting your mind, body and soul.


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Cross-training is when each person is trained to do other people's jobs, not just their own. When done even half-way competently, cross-training has several advantages: Each person knows that someone else can check their work. Work does not stop just because one person is out of the office or on vacation. Employees can relax when they go on vacation, ...


1

Thinking of it and come to think of it are phrases that people use in different circumstances. Taking come to think of it first, I like Merriam Webster's explanation: —used in speech to say that one has just remembered or thought of something Collins English Dictionary offers indicates that you have suddenly realized something, often something obvious It'...


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"Come to think of it" means that you are adding some additional factor to a decision. The standard alternative way of saying this would be "Thinking about it again" (or some variation like "thinking about it some more"). If you decide to take a complete opposite decision, you can also use the standard phrase "on second thought".


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It means what it says. I haven't read the book, but I suspect that the implication is "so that people won't see the syringe marks".


2

One common idiom is to say, It's not written in stone. Obviously, if you have a rule that's literally carved into stone, it's difficult to amend. Also, it's likely that this idiom is based on the Biblical story of Moses revealing the Ten Commandments written on stone tablets, so this idiom is the equivalent of saying, "It's not a commandment directly from ...


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I think this idiom might fit: There's no hard-and-fast rule about X. Hard-and-fast means strongly binding; not to be set aside or violated. However, in the context of contracts and in consideration of leniency, I can't think of one.


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To say it's not so rigid you can say: "You do not need to take this literally." Tied up. You will hear native English speakers using the phrasal verb [tied up] all the time! You can’t take this literally, this has nothing to do with actually being tied up! (Canlearnenglish.com)


3

A single word that describes this idea is placeholder: 1 : a person or thing that occupies the position or place of another person or thing // The bill would empower the governor to appoint a placeholder to a vacant U.S. Senate seat, to serve through the next general election cycle. — John Sharp // The result was that the legislation ...


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Perhaps They were literally at each others' throats (barehanded fighting only) Now they were fighting for real. George saw the glint of the knife and grabbed the first thing he touched: a crowbar.


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Some possibilities include: "Engaged/were locked in mortal combat." "Fought (each other) to the death." "dueled", "clashed" Softer possibilities include "threw down" (which evokes the image of someone removing boxing gloves and restrictive clothing - "The gloves came off"), or softer still, they "had a fight".


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Consider the following idioms. To push one's buttons. Meaning: to do things that create a very strong emotional reaction in one, especially anger, irritation, or exasperation: I hate Mary's new boyfriend, he's always trying to push my buttons, and he's doing a good job of it! To hit/strike/touch a nerve. Meaning: to make someone feel angry, upset, ...


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The sentence contains three clauses: Donald Trump’s desire to nominate Mr Cain had sparked a backlash, even among Republicans. (The main clause) (Who were) worried. (Dependent clause) that the president was seeking to undermine the independence of the central bank by appointing his supporters. (Dependent clause) The subject of the first dependent clause is ...


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The main clause of the example sentence is: Donald Trump’s desire to nominate Mr Cain had sparked a backlash The verb is "spark" in the form 'had sparked". The subject is "Donald Trump’s desire to nominate Mr Cain" and the object is "backlash". The secondary clause "even among Republicans worried that the president was seeking..." explains who was ...


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What you have quoted isn't a clause. It parses as "even among [Republicans (who are) worried that ... ]" Edit: I have been asked to expand this. From what you say, you seem to be mis-parsing, thinking that "worried" is a past-tense verb, and asking what it its subject. It is not: it is a past participle, with adjectival force here. The adjectival ...


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They are usually actually "gravel traps", and are a type of "run-off area". Theese seem to be the technical terms, but they are quite understandable "gravel filled area to trap run-away cars" and "an area for cars to run off the track into".


5

I think the source of that statement was mixing his idioms. I think he meant to say "cut the mustard" (meaning "to be adequate"), but he accidentally confused "mustard" with "cheese", with funny results -- unless he did it on purpose to be humorous.


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As might be guessed from context "cut the cheese" can mean "be sufficient" or "do the job".


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Native speakers looking for this kind of thing use a thesaurus (wikipedia), most often one descended from Roget's 1805 work. An online version of that gives separate 10 Irrelation: Adj. disrelated, disconnected, dissociated, detached, removed, separated, separate, segregate, apart, independent, independent. 15 Difference: Vb. separate, sever,...


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You're so right that translation is far more than simply substituting words. To translate well from one language to another you need to have a reasonable idiomatic understanding of both. My favourite example of how you can't translate with a bilingual dictionary alone is that if you were asked to translate the German term "schraube and mutter" into English ...


3

This is obviously where experience and knowledge starts to really help! One practical way that even native speakers are advised to use to get that knowledge is a decent thesaurus, and then under synonyms or antonyms there should be some useful alternatives - including phrasal verbs. Here is thesaurus.com I have put in 'separate' already. Notice the tabs ...


3

"Come together" can also mean that something is developing or working out as you want it to. In this case, the app is letting you see how the plan gets set up and working effectively. 3 : to begin to work or proceed in the desired way // The project started slowly, but everything is finally starting to come together now. Source: Merriam-Webster.


2

I: Uh huh. Are women’s films actually made for women? I mean, do the film makers sit down and say ‘We’re going to make a women’s film here’? P: Yes, they often make a story which they think women will like. But often it’s the other way round. For example films from classic literature, such as Pride and Prejudice – these could be called women’s films. ...


1

I think the idiom is misused here, because the professor is not actually contrasting too opposites. She (or he) says that filmmakers often set out to write films for women, by casting certain actors or focusing on certain themes. But it's actually stories from classical literature that women end up liking. The problem is that stories like "Pride and ...


1

A US business phrase heard frequently is Let's find a solution which doesn't require boiling the ocean Ie, the solution requires we solve some insolubly-large sub-problem. For the suggestion that loud people are not effective: An empty vessel makes the most sound (proverb) Perhaps one of these fits your circumstance.


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I am not aware of an identical expression. However there are parallels, especially relating to people whose great ambitions lead to their downfall. Among them is the line in Shakespeare's play Macbeth that refers to the protagonist's fatal ambition to gain power at all costs: To prick the sides of my intent, but only vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps ...


2

An expression that comes close to your proverb is: The devil take the hindmost defined by phrases.org.uk as: A proverbial phrase indicating that those who lag behind will receive no aid. And by Widtionary as: everyone should look after their own interests, leaving those who cannot cope to whatever fate befalls them. There is a cycle race - with ...


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1) As you mentioned, all of these statement are very close in meaning to each other. A slight difference in meaning I see is that while 'putting a spoke in his (or their) wheel' always indicates interfering with the plans of someone else, 'putting a monkey wrench/spanner in the works' means that you are fouling up a particular system but not always the plans ...


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prepostion + adj Normally, a preposition can't link an adj / adv. But these examples may be noticed. Your account is far from (being) true. The ancients conceived the world as (being) flat. So "Where can I download music for free?" can be interpreted as "Where can I download music for being free?"


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Your suggestion is a perfectly constructed way to say it It's not as if the sky is falling down. Also It's not as if it's the end of the world.


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The specific phrase "slipped up on" means "made a mistake about" or "made a mistake in regard to. The phrase folloing "on" indicates exactly what the mistake concerned. In this use, on does not imply "during" or 'while" as it can in other constructions. He slipped up on just one detail. One detail was incorrect, althoguh everythign else was right. Often ...


3

Something that is very close to this sentiment—although being a proverb, it's not identical—is every dog has its day: [The Free Dictionary] Prov. Everyone gets a chance eventually. Don't worry, you'll get chosen for the team. Every dog has its day. You may become famous someday. Every dog has his day. Although, if interpreted in its usual sense it's ...


3

I have commonly heard: One man's trash is another man's treasure. It doesn't have the exact same meaning, but it is similar to what you are looking for. Even if you do not have a use for something, it may have a use to other people. It can therefore also mean that even if you don't obviously have a use for something now, it does not mean that it is ...


2

"Letting the grass grow under your feet" is a saying about procrastination, so it does not really fit. "Until the cows come home" does mean a long time, but not indefinitely - the cows come home each day (it refers to them returning each morning for milking after being put out to pasture at night). "Hell freezes over" is normally used when saying that ...


2

Still waters run deep. Originally the proverb implied that silent people are dangerous because their motives cannot be read—they may be harboring hostile intentions. Today, however, the proverb is usually understood to mean that silent people have hidden depths of insight and emotion—they should not be dismissed merely because they don't parade ...


2

Sayings like "there is life in the old dog yet", or "there is many a good tune played on an old fiddle" certainly fit, but they can both imply an element of surprise at the old person's ability to keep up with someone younger as if the display of vitality is uncharacteristic. If instead, you want to portray the older person as fit, strong, and dismissive of ...


1

It is slang, but the meaning is fairly literal: don't act hatefully towards me. It's often said humorously, where hate is a much stronger word than would be appropriate. In this more jocular context, the meaning is more like, "don't be rude."


2

I know the second one as There is life in the old dog yet. As given in The Free Dictionary. One still has vitality or the ability to perform certain actions despite one's advanced age. Did you see Grandpa out on the dance floor? There's life in the old dog yet!


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The author of the story humorously modified the established idiom. Just as the Christian Bible was used for oaths by ordinary people, so railway officials might consider their timetables to be 'holy books' that regulate their activies. You can imagine that English teachers might swear on a stack of dictionaries, or of copies of a well-known grammar book.


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