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1 vote
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What is the history of "break a leg", why It is used in English?

Wikipedia defines break a leg: Break a leg is an English language idiom used in the theatre or other performing arts to wish a performer "good luck". Several dictionaries give definitions ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
0 votes

Should you say "mistake a deer as a horse" or "mistake a deer for a horse"?

You would say: People don't usually mistake a deer for a horse. Meaning that people don't usually confuse the physical characteristics of the two animals (how they look). As doesn't make sense here, ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
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0 votes
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Is the idiom "loads of wildlife" - singular or plural?

'Wildlife' is a collective noun. Collective nouns are used to refer to a group of people, animals, or things, either *as a single entity or as individuals within the group. Collective nouns refer to a ...
James Mathai's user avatar
2 votes

Why is there no 'that' before 'meets' in 'more than meets the eye'?

There's a lot that's "weird" about this construction, so let's look at one that's built the same way but easier to think about. There are more people here than fit in this car. Given this ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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0 votes

Can I use "I'm on the clock" if I'm self-employed?

"on the clock" depends on context. You can be your own timekeeper. It just means the passing time has a monetary value associated with it. If you have three hours to do a job, and it 2 hours ...
Lambie's user avatar
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3 votes
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Can I use "I'm on the clock" if I'm self-employed?

Yes, self-employed people get paid too. If your contract with a client specifies that you get paid more for working longer then you are "on the clock". For example, I might hire a gardener ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
0 votes

Meaning of "Would never have thought"

would never have thought This is a common phrase, and could be considered an idiom. It means that the subject is surprised by new information, that they did not predict it. Here is a EL&U ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
-1 votes

What is the difference between ''on the loose'' and at large?

AmE: Merriam Webster at-large adjective ˈat-ˈlärj : relating to or being a political representative who is elected to serve an entire area rather than one of its subdivisions an at-large city ...
Lambie's user avatar
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1 vote

What is the difference between ''on the loose'' and at large?

I don't know if other speakers have the same sense of the register of these phrases I do, but in American English there's a difference in register. "At large" is something that might be ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
2 votes

What is the difference between ''on the loose'' and at large?

The idiom "at large" is used only for criminals that the police want to arrest but don't know where they are. They might have escaped from prison, or they might not have been arrested yet. ...
James K's user avatar
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