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0

Bu saying that you are not taking someone’s word at face value, it can be done in efforts to protect oneself. If you do not truly know this person and they have not proven to be trustworthy, then you may not take their word at face value because there is that chance that they have not spoken the truth in their story. With that being said one might expect ...


1

"To sneak around with someone" means to be dating with some amount of (and motivation for) secrecy. It might be an extramarital affair, or a relationship of which some others might disapprove.


1

To poison a well means to render it permanently (or for a very long time) unusable. So to use it an idiom in the example you give, it means "you must decide if the situation has been damaged or compromised beyond repair".


0

I think it means: That you have lots of things to think about in launching a business; and this is one of those many things that you don't have to think about. *PS---(I am not a teacher nor an expert, so don't really count on that answer).


-1

Free your mind. As a Christian, loose yourself means, leave the things that are causing hindrance to your relationship with God.


-1

The expression "holes-in-her-purse" is a person. It is a person who Walt believes has (metaphorical) holes in her purse. It is someone who never has cash, a spendthrift or wasteful person. The adjective "old" is being used casually and suggests "someone who we have known for a long time". If you know the series you will know who she is. So the whole ...


1

It is a fact that there were reports. We would have to use our judgement of the quality of the sources for whether we have confidence that the reports are true. The BBC reports that senior MacDonald's execs are suing for racial discrimination. If you consider the BBC to be a generally reliable source of news then you would believe that the executives ...


1

As a BrE speaker I might use the following phrases (although they have slightly different connotations, and other meanings): Bread and Butter - The day to day repetitive tasks that are easy to do. Grunt Work - The slog, or non-thinking part, that just needs to get done. Gravy - The easy work that gets the money.


2

It is the opposite of what people mean when they say “count me out” or “I don’t count”.


10

It means precisely "When you count the dreamers, you have my permission to include me."


0

I emailed Charles Harington Elster, the author of numerous books on the English language, and Kathy Watson, who is also known as the Ruthless Editor. They both said that all the choices are fine, but Mr. Elster added that [ for the sake of caution] and [ for caution’s sake] sound stilted, but not wrong.


25

An alternative phrasing would be "you can number me among". That is, the speaker is one of the named group, with the (often rhetorical, as here) implication that a large number of people or things is being divided into separate, mutually exclusive groups, and being counted. E.g. "Senator X is counted with Trump's supporters".


13

It is definition 4 here: "to include in a reckoning; take into account"


13

I can understand it so: "you can count me with the dreamers." = "you can think about me that I'm a dreamer." "you can count me with the dreamers." = "you can think about me that I'm one of the dreamers."


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