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Despite the idiom, "take a bath" still means "bathe one's self." Context usually makes it clear. However, in your case, we would say "took a sponge bath" to differentiate from getting into a bathtub. This unequivocally uses the literal meaning and not the idiom, as well.


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Firstly, the use of "take a bath" as an idiom to mean 'take a financial loss' is not particularly common. I'm a native British English speaker, one who is deeply interested in language and literature, and had never heard it before! I looked it up and you are right, it is in the dictionary, but it is the fourteenth definition, so I wouldn't worry ...


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Yes, you are on the right track. The expression is used to warn against using a difficult or obscure word (a so-called "big word") when a simple one would suffice. Separately, you can refer to a complicated word as a [high value] word (e.g. a 5 dollar word) and a simple word as a [low value] word (e.g. a 5 cent word). I found a blog post that has ...


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"Another nail in the coffin" might be the expression you are looking for


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As this NGram graph hows, out of sorts is a lot more common. The two expressions certainly have a large overlap, but in my opinion, there is a difference of degree between the two. Out of sorts means slightly unhappy, probably temporarily- maybe reflecting your mood today. Down in the dumps suggests a rather more serious an long-term problem.


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I use not to put too fine a point on it ironically because in addition to being blunt I make a number of statements to illustrate the point and will provide a number of examples. I have always felt that the statement not to put too fine a point on it includes being blunt and also brief in your statement and I am usually not brief. In short I am making a ...


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Not an idiom, but a mash-up of two expressions. A sacred cow (from the Hindu veneration of cattle) is an idea or principle that is held to be above criticism, especially one which the author believes is unreasonably so. The NHS has become a sacred cow of British politics, no MP dares criticise it. A sacred cow in English grammar might be "Every ...


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