30

Further information: This is the subjunctive mood. It expresses things that aren't real: possibilities, hypotheticals, wishes, that sort of thing. (The "normal" mood, for things that are real, is called the "indicative".) "Would" is a modal verb, used instead of "will" to mark the subjunctive. In this example, Natasha can use the indicative to talk about ...


23

"Rabbit" can also mean "move quickly; run away". It would seem in this context that Loki fled. See the third definition for this verb in the Oxford dictionary.


10

Fred was funny. What does the "was" imply? For starters, it could mean that Fred is no longer funny: Fred was funny, but now he's just a bitter old man. Or it could mean that Fred is no longer with us: Fred was funny; too bad he died last year. It could mean that Fred was funny at a certain time, with the mutual understanding that Fred is ...


10

"I'd" means "I would". So that would surely mean "I would sit this one out if I were you, Cap." If she needed to simply say that she's not getting into the fight, she could've just used "I will" instead of "I would". Besides, Steve replied to her with "I don’t see how I can." ( meaning he can't), clearly pointing out that she was suggesting him to stay ...


8

While I agree that context is important, I do not believe it is always external context. Without an external context to indicate otherwise, I would assume the second sentence is what was meant, not the first. The reason why is that, at least in my variety of English, "may" generally defaults to its permissive sense if possible. Since "slurp" is an action, ...


7

Not necessarily. Let's say Fred is a comedian. We went to his show, and we really enjoyed it. So as we walk out of the show, I say to you: Fred was so funny! This doesn't mean Fred isn't funny anymore. If you say Fred was funny at that time, it definitely implies that he isn't any funny anymore, but it doesn't have to mean he isn't funny anymore. I ...


7

If you check the Cambridge Dictionary, you will see that heart can also mean "courage, determination or hope". Given that Hawkeye was the only person still standing (apart from the stranger), determination or courage is probably the intended meaning in this context.


7

I think your claim is that the statement "either there is a professor of linguistics or there isn't" is a tautology and therefore not a supposition at all. And I think you're right. Unless we want to dive into the philosophy of existence, "X exists" is a true or false statement. If we call that statement P, then from a standpoint of ...


5

Joss Whedon, who wrote The Avengers, also wrote the sci-fi TV series Firefly. There he describes the term rabbiting as "Hightailing; running; fleeing" for the spaceship. (check under the heading "Frontier Life") in the linked webpage. He uses the same term here to mean that Loki flew after impaling Coulson with the Scepter. In a way, this is like a hidden ...


4

As StoneyB said, it's all in the context. If a customer near your table at a restaurant learns over and says "you may slurp your soup loudly", and with a particularly harsh tone of voice, you might consider it rude. 'May' is like any other words-- when written without context (like that), it's impossible to tell. When the word is spoken, you may be able to ...


4

I didn't see any indication on the linked page that that presupposition has anything wrong with it. The page simply points out that a presupposition is implied by the question, and will be recognized by the hearer of the question. It is a yes/no question.


3

British people often express a probability as "betting odds". In Britain, and some other countries, it is legal to place bets on whether some future event will happen. The event could be a particular horse winning a race, a football team winning a match, etc. Events are not restricted to sporting activities*. You can bet on. e.g. whether snow will fall ...


3

This could be easily a synonym of: You have courage. It simply could mean (one of the meanings from Cambridge Dictionary): courage, determination, or hope


3

A connotation can just be an idea that we associate with another word, phrase or sentence. So for example the phrase bucket and spade will have connotations of beaches, sunshine, childhood, seaside holidays and so forth. If you're writer and you want to talk about a grave-robber stealing a body from a cemetery, you probably won't want to say: He picked up ...


3

The first thing to be careful of is "our old man" can mean "our dad" in some British English dialects. With that said, let's look at the bit of your example you gave: Our old man is going to buy something for dinner That sentence doesn't necessarily mean that he's buying something for us as well as himself, but it is ambiguous. Here're a few examples ...


3

The other answers have the word covered, but do not really explain the context: when Loki says “You have heart”, he is admiring Hawkeye’s strength and resilience, and deciding to put it to work instead of just killing him. In this case, the phrase “You have heart” Is a way of explaining to the viewer why Loki uses the scepter to brainwash Hawkeye instead of ...


3

"Natasha told Cap that she would not join the fight between Thor and Iron Man, it's his (Cap) turn to do so." This is definitely NOT the message of the fragment presented. “I’d sit this one out, Cap,” she said. with the same meaning as: "I would sit this one out if I were you, cap", Natasha said. (your own guess - which is correct) Judging the ...


3

"A bag full of cats" is an Irish expression for a bad-tempered person and that does seem the closest definition to what is intended here. However, that isn't widely known and I'm not sure that is what influenced your quote from Avengers. Not all metaphors and expressions are out of a book - some are made up on the spot! I think the writer just thought that ...


3

There's nothing weird about "security features" as a security system can be made up of many things, a camera, sound systems, all sorts of things.


3

You are correct. This is a variation of meaning number one. Wiktionary has some definitions that help: on the clock [prepositional phrase] (sports) In the official time remaining in a game or other sporting event. With only three seconds on the clock and the Knicks about to win, 102-96, in their playoff opener against the Philadelphia ...


3

What's being presupposed in addition to the polarity Considering the intent of that particular example, I believe that this sentence is simply explicitly highlighting the trivial, perhaps tautological presupposition to illustrate that even though we might not think about it, such sentences imply the polarity and if we want to be careful, that should be ...


2

Implications and connotations are linked but not synonymous. Let's start with some definitions: Implication: the conclusion that can be drawn from something although it is not explicitly stated. Connotation: an idea or feeling which a word invokes for a person in addition to its literal or primary meaning. An easy example of an implication is when someone ...


2

Lyrics like poetry, are open to interpretation. The room is loud because with no one else in there, you can only hear your own thoughts. There is no distraction "Them" is (imo) referring to those loud thoughts. I agree, "it" refers to (lost) love. "Hold on", probably means, it will get better, do not give up, there will be another love and friends to ...


2

I personally disagree with P. E. Dant's comment, as it would probably get misinterpreted quite often - see below. In my opinion, it's not really OK the other way around - the phrase carries with it a stern implication, such as in your example. If a student said "Can I have a word with you?" to their teacher, the teacher would probably find it to be mocking ...


2

I have ridden a rollercoaster and now I am dizzy. The only things wrong with your example sentence is that roller coaster is two words, and there should be a comma after them. This is to separate the two independent clauses. Otherwise, the grammar is fine. Contextually, most folks would connect the two clauses as cause and effect. That is not the best way ...


2

This answer is the answer: " Stark : The next building is gonna say "Potts" on the tower. "This building says "Stark" on the tower. The next one is going to say "Potts" on the tower" They're talking about the "next building" after Stark Tower, aka the Tower that has Stark written in big letters outside. So yes, he's saying let's have the next ...


2

I haven't watched that movie recently so I'm not sure about the scene but I think that the quoted answer provided by @virolino may be not correct. As you have written, according to the Cambridge Dictionary lease a legal agreement in which you pay money in order to use a building, piece of land, vehicle, etc. for a period On the lease is not an idiom, ...


2

"I’d sit this one out, Cap," Natasha said. My friend believed that it means : "Natasha told Cap that she would not join the fight between Thor and Iron Man, It's his (Cap) turn to do so." I believe that this is a suggestion as : "I would sit this one out if I were you, cap", Natasha said. You are right and your friend is wrong. The ...


2

It is a pun, or wordplay. It plays with the double meaning of "intelligence" meaning both "spies" and "cleverness". The second "intelligence" basically means "cleverness", and, in context, it is probably Tony talking about himself.


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