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Based on information from police report you are a traitor. Always wrong. Based on information from the police report you are a traitor. Speaker/writer of this sentence expects you to know which police report he/she is talking/writing about. You can't know this just from this sentence, there would have to be earlier sentences or conversation. Based ...


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Well, you could deliberately construct a context where the version with the definite article works: There are two boxes in the room. This box (pointing to one) is big. This is the big box. However, I would advise against making up more context to fit with an otherwise incorrect answer. Since in your title you specify the test as from a textbook for ...


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Property can be a count noun, but in this sense it is not, so as a property doesn't make sense. You could say He treats his dog as property. but it is much more natural to say He treats his dog as his property.


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This is an interesting problem case that you've brought up. I had not previously thought about the ambiguity that could arise when a noun is both countable and uncountable and can be paired with an adjective that has an alternate (negative) form starting with "un". Luckily, I think the main reason I've never thought about this is that I'm pretty sure it's ...


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Definite noun phrases have different uses in English. A general usage is that the speaker uses a definite noun phrase when they assume that the hearer can identify the referent of the noun phrase. Example: I like the movie, Pulp Fiction. The speaker assumes the hearer can identify the referent, that is, the hearer can identity which movie the speaker ...


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If you want to introduce a movie which you think the listener does not know about, a more natural expression would be "I saw a movie called 'Pulp Fiction'". In your case, it should be "I like the movie, 'Pulp fiction'." because 'Pulp fiction' is in apposition with 'the movie' and 'the' acts as a pointer to 'Pulp fiction'. It doesn't alter the use of 'the' ...


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A screenshot is a picture of what is on a computer screen at a particular time, so I think there should be at least an article(the/a) before the 'screenshot'. According to the meaning of your sentence, the most possibly appropriate one should be: "What is the name of the game in the screenshot?", since the speaker is asking about what the name of the game ...


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Many nouns can be both countable and uncountable, depending on context. An uncountable noun refers to an idea or a concept. A countable noun refers to a specific thing. So for example, I might say, "I like chocolate." I like chocolate in general. It's not that I like one particular piece of chocolate, but that I like chocolate in general. But if you were ...


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Words denoting measureable quantities can usually be used as uncountable in some contexts. One such context is after in, as a prepositional phrase qualifying another phrase to specify the property: a drop in temperature an increase in size decreased in number small in area great in value


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It is not a mistake to say "a subscription" but it is not normally what you mean. The first example looks wrong to me. The word "subscription" should be used a countable noun, and so you need some article or determiner. The second is correct. If a person had multiple subscriptions and the meaning was "you can cancel one of them". However this is ...


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