38 votes
Accepted

Why does this sentence use "to writing" instead of "to write"?

Both those sentences are grammatically correct, but they have very different meanings, and Hemingway's version is the correct one for the intended meaning. This portion of the quote can have two ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 49.4k
17 votes

Chicken out followed by an infinitive

That's not how we'd phrase it, no. Most people would say: She chickened out of going there by herself.
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 98.2k
17 votes

Why does this sentence use "to writing" instead of "to write"?

I don't like the Merriam-Webster explanation that is given by another answer, because it is completely opaque even to me (a native speaker). All you need to know is that the phrase in question means: ...
user21820's user avatar
  • 1,462
15 votes
Accepted

'Thank you for taking your time writing' or 'Thank you for taking your time to write' ?

taking your time means doing something slowly: this is probably not the meaning that you want! The correct expression to use is "taking the time". The gerund works with taking your time: You are ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.4k
14 votes

"get used to cycle" or "get used to cycling"

No, this aspect of grammar has not changed, but the rule you state only applies to one usage of used to. But in fact "used to" has two definitions. When used to is used as a verb, then your ...
cbh's user avatar
  • 1,759
14 votes

Is it correct to say "She taught me drawing" and "She taught me to draw"?

You could use both. The infinitive form means that you didn't know how to draw, and then she taught you, and now you do know how to draw. The "-ing" suggests that there is a skill called &...
James K's user avatar
  • 213k
12 votes
Accepted

What is difference between 'to publish' and 'publishing'?

The infinitive or infinitive phrase can indeed be the subject of the verb. So we cannot reject d) on simple grounds. To swim the English Channel is her dream. To succeed requires diligence. ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 122k
11 votes
Accepted

Looking forward to talk to you or looking forward to talking to you. Which is correct?

...looking forward to talking Is correct. Many students were told by their teacher to not put -ing after to. But, to in ..look forward to.. is not an infinitive marker. "Look forward to" is a ...
Mohd Zulkanien Sarbini's user avatar
8 votes

What is the difference between "I can't stand smoking" and "I can't stand to smoke"?

Both sentences have the feeling that you do not like smoking or secondary smoke. I can't stand smoking can have two meanings: 1) You do not like to smoke 2) You do not like smoking in general (i....
Peter's user avatar
  • 66.2k
8 votes

'Thank you for taking your time writing' or 'Thank you for taking your time to write' ?

There's nothing really wrong with either one. I just maybe suggest Thank you for taking the time to write this wonderful answer! I think that that's more commonly used.
Mithical's user avatar
  • 742
7 votes
Accepted

"Goal is building/to build X"

Neither. The correct sentence would be The goal is to build a cheap SLA printer. Edit: Why "to build" rather than "building"? Both are grammatically correct, but consider My goal is becoming ...
Michael Lorton's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

"Used to" vs "Use to"

"Used to" is a specific idiom meaning 'accustomed to' , and not strictly related to any meaning of 'used'. 'Use to' is incorrect if it is intended to mean the same thing as 'used to' (though it's a ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 4,211
7 votes
Accepted

Which one is correct. I oppose to taking a drug or I'm opposed to taking a drug?

oppose is a transitive verb taking a direct object. I oppose {something}. An adjective can be formed from the past participle of the verb, indicating state. I am opposed to {something}. I ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 122k
6 votes

What is the difference between 'want camping' and 'I want to camp'?

"I want camping" doesn't make sense. "Camping" is an activity, not an object. You can say, "I want to go camping" -- or "I want to camp", your other example. (Similarly, you can't say, "I want eating."...
Jay's user avatar
  • 63.1k
6 votes
Accepted

"For example" and "such as"

When what you are listing is a verb or a verbal phrase, use the gerund form. We all have many home-maintenance tasks, such as washing our clothes, cleaning the kitchen, and taking out the garbage.
John Feltz's user avatar
  • 5,126
6 votes

What are the differences between "sorry to keep you waiting" and "sorry for keeping you waiting."?

Let's say you've been waiting to speak with someone in their office. You're outside in a waiting room. They open the door. Any of these phrases could come out of their mouth: Sorry to keep you ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 122k
6 votes

"Don't go breaking my heart" versus "Don't go break my heart"

As a speaker of American English, the following sentences are idiomatic to me. Don't go breaking my heart. Don't break my heart. The following has a different meaning from the above: Don'...
TimR's user avatar
  • 122k
6 votes
Accepted

Is this grammatically correct - "I miss to swim"

I'm not very sure as to why it isn't grammatically correct, but it doesn't sound very natural to me. I would rather say "I miss swimming". You see, English has a bunch of unwritten rules ...
Kaique's user avatar
  • 3,727
6 votes
Accepted

"Spending more time TRYING....." and "Spending more time TO TRY....."

As I see it, the difference is one of emphasis: Spending more time trying to […] This suggests that you are continually trying to achieve your aim, throughout the whole period of time. Spending ...
gidds's user avatar
  • 1,047
5 votes

"Does that mean to kill" or "does that mean killing", Which one is the proper one, and why?

The word ermorden is an German infinitive. In English, you make a verb into an infinitive by putting the word "to" in front it, and you make a noun (Ermorden with a capital E) or an active participle ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.4k
5 votes
Accepted

I like knowing / to know things in advance

As the link you quoted says, it is a very small difference. It's not really a difference in meaning, but in implication. Try this example: I like eating ice cream. Emphasises the action or ...
wysiwyg's user avatar
  • 179
5 votes

Using past continuous to refer to past habits with adverbials of frequency?

They're all grammatical. You could say In those days, I was taking the train to work every day. In those days, I took the train to work every day. In those days, I would take the train ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 122k
5 votes
Accepted

Can I use an infinitive with the verb 'recommend'?

All of those examples sound somewhat strange to me, and several of them contain other grammatical errors that suggest they were not composed by a native speaker. The recommend you to... construction ...
iafisher's user avatar
  • 221
5 votes
Accepted

it ~ to vs it ~ ing

From M.Swan's PEU: Infinitives are forms like (to) write, (to) stand. Unlike verb tenses (e.g. writes, stood), infinitives do not usually show the actual times of actions or events. They usually ...
Michael Login's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

negation of "the need"

The common negation of this expression would be: No need for (any) tester programming. Examples: Although it is an important component of the design, there is no need for catastrophic failure ...
Andrew's user avatar
  • 88.2k
5 votes
Accepted

"consumers choosing to rely" vs. "consumers to choose to rely"

This is a complicated sentence: Signals that are related imperfectly to actual quality will mislead those consumers choosing/to choose to rely upon these inaccurate signals. Let's simplify: ...
whiskeychief's user avatar
  • 4,027
5 votes
Accepted

Difference between 'try to do' and 'try doing'

They are both perfectly grammatical sentences, but mean different things. You could try to phone his office. This implies "phoning" might fail. It's like saying "Try to jump over the stream." You ...
Sam's user avatar
  • 9,525
5 votes
Accepted

Is it correct to say "I saw Tom opening the door"?

Yes, it's grammatically correct, but whether or not it correctly conveys your intended meaning is another matter. The issue isn't one of being grammatically correct but being correct in meaning as ...
Benjamin Harman's user avatar
5 votes

Please help identify subject/noun/verbs?

Recognizing and pursuing only your interests results in a selfish, collapsing world order. At the most basic level, this sentence has a very simple structure: [Subject] [verbs] [object]. But the ...
randomhead's user avatar
  • 21.1k

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