38 votes
Accepted

Why does this sentence use "to writing" instead of "to write"?

Both those sentences are grammatically correct, but they have very different meanings, and Hemingway's version is the correct one for the intended meaning. This portion of the quote can have two ...
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  • 13.8k
21 votes
Accepted

"He was too busy to work at a factory" - Is this sentence correct in grammar?

Both sentences are grammatical, but mean different things. He was too busy working at a factory. means that because he was working at a factory so much, he could not do anything else. He was ...
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  • 394
19 votes
Accepted

Looking forward to see you vs Looking forward to seeing you?

There's two different things going on here, both of which use the word to, which is probably what's confusing you. The rule your teacher taught you applies to infinitives, in the context of sentences ...
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17 votes

Chicken out followed by an infinitive

That's not how we'd phrase it, no. Most people would say: She chickened out of going there by herself.
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  • 73k
17 votes

Why does this sentence use "to writing" instead of "to write"?

I don't like the Merriam-Webster explanation that is given by another answer, because it is completely opaque even to me (a native speaker). All you need to know is that the phrase in question means: ...
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  • 1,253
14 votes

"get used to cycle" or "get used to cycling"

No, this aspect of grammar has not changed, but the rule you state only applies to one usage of used to. But in fact "used to" has two definitions. When used to is used as a verb, then your ...
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  • 1,739
14 votes

Is it correct to say "She taught me drawing" and "She taught me to draw"?

You could use both. The infinitive form means that you didn't know how to draw, and then she taught you, and now you do know how to draw. The "-ing" suggests that there is a skill called &...
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  • 149k
13 votes
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'Thank you for taking your time writing' or 'Thank you for taking your time to write' ?

taking your time means doing something slowly: this is probably not the meaning that you want! The correct expression to use is "taking the time". The gerund works with taking your time: You are ...
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  • 56.2k
12 votes
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What is difference between 'to publish' and 'publishing'?

The infinitive or infinitive phrase can indeed be the subject of the verb. So we cannot reject d) on simple grounds. To swim the English Channel is her dream. To succeed requires diligence. ...
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11 votes
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Looking forward to talk to you or looking forward to talking to you. Which is correct?

...looking forward to talking Is correct. Many students were told by their teacher to not put -ing after to. But, to in ..look forward to.. is not an infinitive marker. "Look forward to" is a ...
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  • 8,628
8 votes

What's the diffence between "I want you to go to sleep" and "I want you going to sleep"

The first sentence is correct. I can imagine just about anyone saying this in the proper context: I want you to go to sleep. The second sentence is gramatically incorrect: I want you going to ...
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8 votes

What is the difference between "I can't stand smoking" and "I can't stand to smoke"?

Both sentences have the feeling that you do not like smoking or secondary smoke. I can't stand smoking can have two meanings: 1) You do not like to smoke 2) You do not like smoking in general (i....
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  • 65.3k
8 votes

'Thank you for taking your time writing' or 'Thank you for taking your time to write' ?

There's nothing really wrong with either one. I just maybe suggest Thank you for taking the time to write this wonderful answer! I think that that's more commonly used.
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  • 738
7 votes

Which is correct, "go to swim", "go to swimming", or "go swimming"? What are the differences?

I want to go to swim. Phrasing it this way implies that your primary goal is to swim. For instance, it would be the proper response to the question "Why do you want to go to the lake?" I want to ...
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  • 281
7 votes
Accepted

"Goal is building/to build X"

Neither. The correct sentence would be The goal is to build a cheap SLA printer. Edit: Why "to build" rather than "building"? Both are grammatically correct, but consider My goal is becoming ...
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7 votes
Accepted

"Used to" vs "Use to"

"Used to" is a specific idiom meaning 'accustomed to' , and not strictly related to any meaning of 'used'. 'Use to' is incorrect if it is intended to mean the same thing as 'used to' (though it's a ...
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  • 2,916
7 votes
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Which one is correct. I oppose to taking a drug or I'm opposed to taking a drug?

oppose is a transitive verb taking a direct object. I oppose {something}. An adjective can be formed from the past participle of the verb, indicating state. I am opposed to {something}. I ...
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6 votes

"He was too busy to work at a factory" - Is this sentence correct in grammar?

Busy + v. + ing He was too busy working at a factory. = He was occupied with working at a factory. (he was actually working at a factory) Too + adj. + to + v.(inf.) He was too busy to work at a ...
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6 votes

What's the difference between "I love singing" and "I love to sing"?

Meaning I love to do that I love doing that In many, if not most situations these two sentences can be used interchangeably. But they can have very slightly different meanings too. When we use verbs ...
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6 votes

What's the difference between "I love singing" and "I love to sing"?

By1) I love singing. 2) I love to sing. Love is one of the verbs that takes after it either a to-infinitive or an -ing form, without any difference in meaning. No doubt, according to grammar, ...
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  • 26.7k
6 votes

"to be" vs. "being" after adjective (and why)

Both usages are equally correct. In both examples, you are using a verb (being, to be) in place of a noun. In the first case, you are using the gerund form of the verb, and in the second, you are ...
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  • 1,154
6 votes
Accepted

have or having after preposition with two objects

He's afraid of being debunked in public and have/having his reputation ruined. The coordinating conjunction and connects two gerund-participial clauses: "being debunked in public" and "having his ...
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  • 36.2k
6 votes

What is the difference between 'want camping' and 'I want to camp'?

"I want camping" doesn't make sense. "Camping" is an activity, not an object. You can say, "I want to go camping" -- or "I want to camp", your other example. (Similarly, you can't say, "I want eating."...
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  • 57.2k
6 votes
Accepted

"For example" and "such as"

When what you are listing is a verb or a verbal phrase, use the gerund form. We all have many home-maintenance tasks, such as washing our clothes, cleaning the kitchen, and taking out the garbage.
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  • 5,116
6 votes

What are the differences between "sorry to keep you waiting" and "sorry for keeping you waiting."?

Let's say you've been waiting to speak with someone in their office. You're outside in a waiting room. They open the door. Any of these phrases could come out of their mouth: Sorry to keep you ...
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6 votes

"Don't go breaking my heart" versus "Don't go break my heart"

As a speaker of American English, the following sentences are idiomatic to me. Don't go breaking my heart. Don't break my heart. The following has a different meaning from the above: Don'...
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6 votes
Accepted

Is this grammatically correct - "I miss to swim"

I'm not very sure as to why it isn't grammatically correct, but it doesn't sound very natural to me. I would rather say "I miss swimming". You see, English has a bunch of unwritten rules ...
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  • 3,653
6 votes
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"Spending more time TRYING....." and "Spending more time TO TRY....."

As I see it, the difference is one of emphasis: Spending more time trying to […] This suggests that you are continually trying to achieve your aim, throughout the whole period of time. Spending ...
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  • 722
5 votes
Accepted

"remember visiting" vs. "remember to visit"

You've got it exactly right; remember has two different meanings. With the gerund complement remember means recall (a prior eventuality): I remember visiting the Church of the Holy Sepulcher in ...
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5 votes
Accepted

How can I decide when to use “for” + “-ing” or “to” + [infinitive] in a sentence?

This is a very good explanation of the distinction; I have included it reformatted below: For + -ing: function We use for + the -ing form of a verb to talk about the function of something or how ...
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