21

Both sentences are grammatical, but mean different things. He was too busy working at a factory. means that because he was working at a factory so much, he could not do anything else. He was too busy to work at a factory. means that because he was doing something else so much, he could not work at a factory.


17

That's not how we'd phrase it, no. Most people would say: She chickened out of going there by herself.


16

There's two different things going on here, both of which use the word to, which is probably what's confusing you. The rule your teacher taught you applies to infinitives, in the context of sentences where there are two verbs, like I like to run. The verb following to is in the present tense, as is expected. In this case, to is known as a "particle,&...


14

No, this aspect of grammar has not changed, but the rule you state only applies to one usage of used to. But in fact "used to" has two definitions. When used to is used as a verb, then your grammatical analysis is correct -- it must be followed by an infinitive. This is what you would do when indicating that an action took place in the past (often or ...


14

You could use both. The infinitive form means that you didn't know how to draw, and then she taught you, and now you do know how to draw. The "-ing" suggests that there is a skill called "drawing" and she taught a course in it. Perhaps were already able to draw, but she helped you improve.


13

taking your time means doing something slowly: this is probably not the meaning that you want! The correct expression to use is "taking the time". The gerund works with taking your time: You are taking your time writing those letters- get a move on! But idiomatically the gerund doesn't work with taking the time. The idiomatic version is therefore ...


12

The infinitive or infinitive phrase can indeed be the subject of the verb. So we cannot reject d) on simple grounds. To swim the English Channel is her dream. To succeed requires diligence. To travel from New York to Washington by train takes several hours. However, the infinitive refers to the idea of the action, an action that could possibly ...


11

...looking forward to talking Is correct. Many students were told by their teacher to not put -ing after to. But, to in ..look forward to.. is not an infinitive marker. "Look forward to" is a prepositional phrase and "to" is a preposition here. A preposition needs a direct object. A direct object can be a noun or a noun form of verb (gerund).


10

A good question: Why do some verbs take a to-infinitive and why are some verbs followed by a gerund. The silly thing is grammars don't give an answer to this interesting question. They only give lists. And that does not give an understanding of language. When you study the problem verb + to-infinitive (tinf) or gerund (ger) in grammars you wil find the ...


8

The first sentence is correct. I can imagine just about anyone saying this in the proper context: I want you to go to sleep. The second sentence is gramatically incorrect: I want you going to sleep. There are grammatical rules regarding which verbs can be followed by infinitives, gerunds, or both. The first (correct) sentence acts as a present tense ...


8

Both sentences have the feeling that you do not like smoking or secondary smoke. I can't stand smoking can have two meanings: 1) You do not like to smoke 2) You do not like smoking in general (i.e. either you or other people) I can't stand to smoke only has one meaning, you do not like having a cigarette.


8

There's nothing really wrong with either one. I just maybe suggest Thank you for taking the time to write this wonderful answer! I think that that's more commonly used.


7

A) The telephone is ringing. I'll go and answer it. "And" is often omitted by native speakers, so your impression was right there. B) I feel like going dancing tonight. Sounds nice and natural to me, since we refer to this activity as "dancing". I can see how you might be worried about having two "-ing" verbs adjacent, but it's honestly a perfect ...


7

I want to go to swim. Phrasing it this way implies that your primary goal is to swim. For instance, it would be the proper response to the question "Why do you want to go to the lake?" I want to go swimming. Phrasing it this way implies a desire to perform the act of swimming. It is more of a general intention to go swimming anywhere. It is equivalent ...


7

Neither. The correct sentence would be The goal is to build a cheap SLA printer. Edit: Why "to build" rather than "building"? Both are grammatically correct, but consider My goal is becoming a doctor. and My goal is becoming unreachable. Those sentences are very different. In the first sentence, the verb is "to be" ("is" is the third-person ...


7

"Used to" is a specific idiom meaning 'accustomed to' , and not strictly related to any meaning of 'used'. 'Use to' is incorrect if it is intended to mean the same thing as 'used to' (though it's a common mistake). 'Used to' is an adjective phrase, so "I am used to ..." is present tense, just like "I am happy". The idiom is followed by a noun or noun ...


7

oppose is a transitive verb taking a direct object. I oppose {something}. An adjective can be formed from the past participle of the verb, indicating state. I am opposed to {something}. I am opposed to inflationary economic policies. We have the verb-to-be (am) and so opposed is predicated about the subject, "I". The prepositional phrase ...


6

Here are my initial thoughts, before visiting the link in the comment by CopperKettle: It needs more context. Some suspected what? A conspiracy? An impending crime? Some became suspicious after seeing the guard and the thief together. That's how I'd write the sentence, but you never really tell us what you are trying to say, so my suggestion may not be ...


6

Your first example is idiomatic. I did my best to do this. ... It means “I tried as hard as I could to accomplish this”—regardless of whether you actually did accomplish it. Your second example is not idiomatic, but it is very close to a different idiom. I did my best in doing this. ... It means “This was the best work I had ...


6

Busy + v. + ing He was too busy working at a factory. = He was occupied with working at a factory. (he was actually working at a factory) Too + adj. + to + v.(inf.) He was too busy to work at a factory. = He was occupied with doing something else (not working at a factory) that prevented him from working at a factory.


6

By1) I love singing. 2) I love to sing. Love is one of the verbs that takes after it either a to-infinitive or an -ing form, without any difference in meaning. No doubt, according to grammar, although both sentences should convey the same meaning, the sentence #1 is a bit ambiguous. This ambiguity arises because "singing" is not only a verb (present ...


6

Meaning I love to do that I love doing that In many, if not most situations these two sentences can be used interchangeably. But they can have very slightly different meanings too. When we use verbs like like, love, hate plus an -ING form, it generally means that we like, love or hate something while we are actually doing it. When we say that we like, love ...


6

He's afraid of being debunked in public and have/having his reputation ruined. The coordinating conjunction and connects two gerund-participial clauses: "being debunked in public" and "having his reputation ruined". Both are objects of the preposition of. If we use have instead of having, we will violate the parallelism of this construction. So yes, ...


6

"I want camping" doesn't make sense. "Camping" is an activity, not an object. You can say, "I want to go camping" -- or "I want to camp", your other example. (Similarly, you can't say, "I want eating." You could say "I want to eat" or "I wish I was eating.") Perhaps you heard or read, "I went camping", that is, "went", not "want". That is a common way of ...


6

When what you are listing is a verb or a verbal phrase, use the gerund form. We all have many home-maintenance tasks, such as washing our clothes, cleaning the kitchen, and taking out the garbage.


6

As a speaker of American English, the following sentences are idiomatic to me. Don't go breaking my heart. Don't break my heart. The following has a different meaning from the above: Don't go break my heart. It is difficult to paraphrase nuance. The results are usually very wooden and stilted. The simple imperative isn't nuanced. It is an ...


6

I'm not very sure as to why it isn't grammatically correct, but it doesn't sound very natural to me. I would rather say "I miss swimming". You see, English has a bunch of unwritten rules especially when it comes down to gerunds. "I miss to swim" isn't something we really say. why? like I said, there are things in the language that you'll only learn by ...


6

As I see it, the difference is one of emphasis: Spending more time trying to […] This suggests that you are continually trying to achieve your aim, throughout the whole period of time. Spending more time to try to […] This suggests that you are taking extra time in order to increase your chance of achieving your aim. So the former focusses on your ...


5

Both usages are equally correct. In both examples, you are using a verb (being, to be) in place of a noun. In the first case, you are using the gerund form of the verb, and in the second, you are using the infinitive. The gerund is the more common usage in American English, and is easily identified in most cases by a verb with the -ing ending. Here is a ...


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