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43 votes

"I told you DON´T go" vs. "I told you NOT TO go"

The second sentence is correct, all of the tenses are in agreement. In the first sentence, "I told you" refers to a past event, but "don't" refers to a future event. You could make the sentence ...
fixer1234's user avatar
  • 5,706
38 votes
Accepted

Why does this sentence use "to writing" instead of "to write"?

Both those sentences are grammatically correct, but they have very different meanings, and Hemingway's version is the correct one for the intended meaning. This portion of the quote can have two ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
38 votes
Accepted

Why do commit title sentences start with an infinitive without to?

Commit messages for version control systems often use a particular grammar that's a little different from regular English sentences. As @TimR and @MichaelHarvey said, they use the imperative: similar ...
Dan Getz's user avatar
  • 4,439
25 votes

Why is "I let him to sleep" incorrect (or is it)?

Yes, I let him sleep is correct while I let him to sleep is incorrect. Certain verbs take a bare infinitive, and "let" is one of them. Here's a link that discusses the issue more.
Katy's user avatar
  • 11k
22 votes

When is "seems to be" used instead of "seems"?

Seem used as a link verb can be followed by an adjective,to be +an adjective, You seem (to be )angry with something, noun phrases, She seems (to be) a nice girl. infinitives, They seem to ...
V.V.'s user avatar
  • 7,115
22 votes
Accepted

Is saying "I am excited to eat grapes" correct to imply that you like eating grapes?

Short answer, no. You're right, "I am excited to X" usually means that you are doing X right now or are going to in the future, and that prospect excites you. Now, the whole thing is a bit ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 13.9k
21 votes
Accepted

"On their way to killing". Does it sound right?

Not every "to" marks an infinitive: on their way to the store on their way to victory or defeat on their way to doing something This is the ordinary preposition "to". In general,...
Gary Botnovcan's user avatar
18 votes

"... to apply for a visa" or "... and applied for a visa"?

They are both pretty much fine, but have slightly different meanings due to tense: 'and applied for a visa' suggests that the process was completed, though conversely this may not have been the main ...
MikeB's user avatar
  • 6,340
18 votes
Accepted

Why is "I let him to sleep" incorrect (or is it)?

It is incorrect simply because the idiom is "Let someone [bare infinitive]". In some situations, a "to-infinitive" is used, and in other the bare infinitive is correct. This is one of those times ...
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
17 votes

Why does this sentence use "to writing" instead of "to write"?

I don't like the Merriam-Webster explanation that is given by another answer, because it is completely opaque even to me (a native speaker). All you need to know is that the phrase in question means: ...
user21820's user avatar
  • 1,460
14 votes

"get used to cycle" or "get used to cycling"

No, this aspect of grammar has not changed, but the rule you state only applies to one usage of used to. But in fact "used to" has two definitions. When used to is used as a verb, then your ...
cbh's user avatar
  • 1,759
14 votes

infinitive telling the purpose

I wouldn't say it's incorrect. But it's rather verbose. It doesn't change the meaning. It doesn't add anything to it. I think in order to would make more sense at the beginning of the sentence. In ...
Andrew Tobilko's user avatar
14 votes

If a legatee receives a legacy, what is the legacy giver called? Maybe legateer?

The legal term here is... testator - a person who dies leaving a will or testament in force ...but you'd rarely hear that in normal conversational contexts. Ordinary people don't have a word for &...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
12 votes

"I told you DON´T go" vs. "I told you NOT TO go"

Consider a simpler sentence: I like ice cream. When we want to negate this, in English, we need "do", which is called an auxiliary verb. Just adding "not" is not enough. *I not like ice cream. ...
M.A.R.'s user avatar
  • 7,351
12 votes

"... to apply for a visa" or "... and applied for a visa"?

They're both perfectly valid and "natural", and in most cases they'd be equivalent and interchangeable. But potentially there could be a difference. If it turned out the Chinese consulate ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

"To <verb> a <noun>"

None of those three phrases is a sentence. In those phrases, the word to means that the following verb is an infinitive. It prevents the reader from interpreting the word as an imperative verb. For ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 27.6k
10 votes

"the sun goes down" vs "the sun go down"

In the second sentence, "go" is in the infinitive (the form without "to") following the verb "watch" (I don't know what the proper term for that is). Infinitives are not conjugated to match a subject, ...
Andy Schweig's user avatar
  • 1,225
10 votes

infinitive telling the purpose

He used his disability (in order) to win our votes , which is an evil way to win the election. In many cases, it's optional, and a matter of style, though it is a useful test for determining whether ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
9 votes

When is "seems to be" used instead of "seems"?

STRAIGHT TO THE POINT - SHORT ANSWER - The baby seems happy/comfortable. The baby seems to be happy/comfortable. They both are correct, and there is no difference in meaning. DIGGING ...
Man_From_India's user avatar
9 votes

Use of "have to" vs "am to"

"Be to", oddly enough, means that you have been directed or destined to do something by someone else. I can't. My mother says I am to clean my room. I am to go to London in a fortnight and ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
8 votes

"also has been" vs "has also been"

If the acceptability of the both is taken for granted, I think that the place of also in a sentence will depend upon the context, that is whether it means "like someone already mentioned" (He also has ...
Victor B.'s user avatar
  • 9,555
8 votes

infinitive telling the purpose

I don't think it must be omitted in this case, but I think your teacher's edit constitutes an improvement. Not every correction from a teacher happens because something is "incorrect." Teachers ...
J.R.'s user avatar
  • 110k
8 votes

"On their way to killing". Does it sound right?

To is a sign of the infinitive, but it's also a preposition. Since nouns are the objects of prepositions, gerunds (which take the place of nouns) can appear after to as well. In the phrase the way ...
LawrenceC's user avatar
  • 36.9k
8 votes

Is saying "I am excited to eat grapes" correct to imply that you like eating grapes?

I would agree that being excited to eat grapes may not necessarily indicate you like grapes, although in most contexts it would. It would be a reasonable and usually correct interpretation to expect ...
Nuclear Hoagie's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

"all they did was (to) leave"

If an infinitive is preceded by an auxiliary verb and a phrase ending in do (such as What I did was, All we do is, etc.), the to is optional. From Practical English Usage, 91.5: Expressions like ...
athlonusm's user avatar
  • 1,954
7 votes
Accepted

Why can "to" be or not be omitted in the following?

Good question! When help has an object immediately followed by a complement clause, the to is optional: Please help me (to) unpack these boxes. In the second sentence of your question, the to-...
nschneid's user avatar
  • 5,137
7 votes

If I want to use an infinitive as an adverb in the sentence then I can use an infinitive with any verb as an adverb?

I went there [to drive the car]. When you say 'adverb', I think you mean adjunct. An adverb is a single word like "clearly", "very" "almost" and the like. The expression ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
6 votes

Stop+ Ving and Stop+ to+infinitive?

We use the -ing form after stop to indicate that an action or event is no longer continuing: It’s stopped raining. Let’s go for a walk. (It was raining, but not any more.) We use the to-infinitive ...
V.V.'s user avatar
  • 7,115
6 votes
Accepted

'Help improve Android Studio' <-- Is this grammatically correct?

Biber et al (1999) make this statement: "AmE has an especially strong preference for the pattern verb + bare infinitives although the bare infinitive is more common than the to-infinitive in both ...
Warren Ham's user avatar

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