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0

The problem here is that your phrasing makes it ambiguous since we do not know whether the crying is ongoing or whether it is a future hypothetical event. Since lest is a rather uncommon word it might be better to re-phrase it. Give her something to eat so she doesn't start crying. would work or if she is currently crying Give her something to eat to stop ...


1

Both example sentences in the question are perfectly acceptably, even natural, in US English. I do not agree that (b) is "weaker" or that the current non-existence of the cake makes a difference. The true referent here is the task or project of making the cake. This form can be used for both duties The problem is yours to fix. and privileges The ...


5

As answered by Astralbee and by JavaLatte, both statements are correct English. The second would be understood correctly even though the dessert does not yet exist; it is similar to the sentence "the decision is yours to make" which means you must make the decision. The word "yours" may be taken as referring to the mess or cake, but it ...


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What "yours" means is that something belongs to you. In a) this works: the mess belongs to you, so it's up to you to clean it up. In b) it is semantically weak, because it's making the dessert that belongs to you, not the dessert itself. Sentence b) is understandable and might be acceptable in informal conversation, but it would be clearer to say ...


4

From a BrEng perspective, they are both okay structurally, but only the first is idiomatic. I have heard this used many times, and the inference is that the task of cleaning the mess is the responsibility of the person who created it. 'Making a dessert' is not really the same kind of responsibility, nor does the dessert exist until it is made, unlike the ...


2

Your newly created question does not need to question the action, locked the door for example, because the action did occur therefore it need not be questioned. Highway systems were built to connect the suburbs. What things are connected by building highway systems? The built highway systems connect what? He bought some flowers to give to his wife. To ...


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The sentence I don't know what to happen. is impossible. It puts "I" as subject and "what" as an object, but "happen" is intransitive, and I can't happen something. If it said "I don't know what is to happen.", that would be grammatical, meaning I don't know what will happen.


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How does one make object questions for the nouns following infinitives at the end of these example sentences? If I understand correctly, you are looking to question the final noun phrase: Highway systems were built to connect the suburbs. What were highway systems built to connect? He bought some flowers to give to his wife. *Who did he buy some flowers ...


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Good question! When help has an object immediately followed by a complement clause, the to is optional: Please help me (to) unpack these boxes. In the second sentence of your question, the to-clause is not a complement of help, so the to is mandatory. Let and make only take clausal complements without to: Let me unpack these boxes. Don't make me unpack ...


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From https://www.lieder.net/lieder/get_text.html?TextId=25695: "He promised me at parting / to meet me at springtime here." So it could be used, but gives an antiquated tone. As Collins suggests, either "I promised to send the money..." or "I promised her I would send the money..." would be more idiomatic.


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