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The first would be better punctuated as What do you want coffee with? Milk? Chocolate? The second is similar. In both cases the single words are linked back separately to the first sentence. There could be a separate answer for each word. Another form is Do you want milk? Chocolate? If the last example is a question it would follow the same pattern. (Is it ...


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@Peter’s answer covers how this construction might be valid. That said, people don’t always follow the rules, especially in informal speech. For instance, we may start talking before the list is mentally complete and risk running out of items before we get a chance to say “and”, but we can’t go back and unsay the last item to insert it. (If you ever hear “...


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For example, AAVE, which is African American Vernacular English, uses double negatives. AAVE So do varieties of regional AmE such as southern English. And ain't (though sometimes used on purpose by educated speakers) is generally classed as dialectal and often places the speakers in a lower social class though it is considered proper dialectal usage in AAVE. ...


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