73

Whether you say a or an is determined by the pronunciation of the next word, and nothing else. If the next word begins with a consonant sound (not necessarily a consonant letter!), you say a, and if it begins with a vowel sound (not necessarily a vowel letter!), you say an. So yes, you are correct: if you write or read "SP", you would say "an SP", because "...


24

These are actually called acronyms or initialisms. The few editing guides I checked (like this one from the American Psychological Association) say to use this guide: The general rule for indefinite articles [before acronyms] is to use a before consonants and an before vowels. The trick here is to use your ears (how the acronym is pronounced), not your ...


14

PoP in the context of DNS means "Point of Presence". Anything beyond that is a computer tech question, not an English usage question. Good luck. Here's an article that mentions PoPs (and SuperPoPs!) http://www.dnsmadeeasy.com/dns-made-easy-expands-network-infrastructure-in-hong-kong/


11

I've left a comment already, and the OP has already selected the accepted answer, but I feel compelled to leave a full answer of my own because it feels like there are a number of loose ends. First, it's well established that the use of a vs. an is determined by the sound that comes next, not necessarily the written letter. The Chicago Manual of Style (...


6

I'm a (British) English native speaker, involved in the technology sector, here. Haven't heard that acronym, and would be forced to look it up if I did.


5

It's a valid, though uncommon, acronym. I'd suggest that if you were to use it, that you provide its meaning upon first use. For example: We developed a Persuasive social network for physical Activity (PersonA) that combines automatic input of physical activity data, a smartphone, and a social networking system (SNS). For an overview of this space, ...


5

Citing only my own experience as a person living in Chicago and working in the online sector, I can say that this initialism is not in use at all in the US. I have heard: “social” as an adjective attached to pretty much anything “social networking” as a general concept referring to all social sites collectively “social networks” ditto In my experience, if ...


5

In networking, POP means Point Of Presence. Another one is Post Office Protocol. Point of presence (POP) is the point at which two or more different networks or communication devices build a connection with each other. POP is primarily the infrastructure that allows remote users connect to the Internet. POP mainly refers to an access point, location or ...


4

I have only heard aiso pronunciation in AmE. The numbers can be read different ways, but instead of saying "colon" you should say "part, section, article, etc.", depending on how those sections are indicated in the document


3

If you pronounce the letters individually as "Ess En Ell" (which would be common), the first sound is a vowel, and we would say "an SNL skit." If we speak the words "Saturday Night Live," the first sound is a consonant, and we would say "a Saturday Night Live skit." In print, since you wrote SNL as an acronym, the reader is most likely to "hear" the letters ...


3

In this context, POP would refer to Point of Presence, as noted in other answers. More specifically, a POP is a physical location where servers are located. Generally this is within a Data Centre, and most of the time it refers to dedicated hardware such as a leased server. Services with smaller requirements might be able to use a VPS as a POP, using ...


3

If they are synonymous and the terms are regularly used interchangeably, it's probably fine. This term seems to have many different names. An electric vehicle charging station, also called EV charging station, electric recharging point, charging point, charge point and EVSE (Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment), is an element in an infrastructure that ...


2

The 'rule' would be that you treat the acronym exactly like any other noun. If in any given sentence the full form requires a determiner, then the abbreviation does, too. ... magnetic field (MF) ... (first instance) The magnetic field from a cable can be read by a magnetic sensor. The MF from a cable can be read by a magnetic sensor. ... Kalman Filter (KF) ....


2

MRS is a fairly common logistics name: Brazil and is also the Mexican Railroad System Page 5 of here contains a similar contract to yours, it is asking the buyer for 50% up front against a bank guarantee, and 50% after delivery and installation by the logistic firm involved. In your case the logistic firm is M.R.S..


2

The short answer is that any name and any initial are capitalised. Also, there must be a space between any name and any initial, and some people use a full stop/period after any initial(s). (I don't.) [EDIT: clarification - some people and some publishing companies don't space two (or more) initials together, with or without a full stop/period - J.K. Rowling,...


2

The question asks if it is okay to write "electrical vehicle charging apparatus (EVSE)" when the EVSE is an abbreviation for "electrical vehicle supply equipment". The question overlooks one important point: a parenthesized text doesn't have to be the abbreviation of the noun that comes before it. For example, consider: The North American Telemark ...


1

The only difference between an acronym and an initialism is how it is pronounced. If you don't know how it is pronounced, then you don't know if it an acronym. You may be able to find the abbreviation in a dictionary which will tell you the pronunciation. Note that there is often variation in actual use. You will hear "Lol (laugh out loud)" ...


1

An abbreviation shortens one word or a short sequence of words to one or a few letters. A few random examples: misc. for miscellaneous (abbreviation) Dr for doctor (contraction) HTML for HyperText Markup Language (initialism) sonar for sound navigation and ranging (acronym) etc. for et cetera Sat. for Saturday LOL for laughing out loud John F. Kennedy (or ...


1

Usually in English, a person's father's or mother's name are not relevant for a person's own name. The usual way a person's name is built up in English is as follows: A person has a family name, or surname. This is usually the same as the surname of the father - but it can be the mother's as well. A common surname is, for instance, Johnson. Then, a person'...


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