89 votes

Can I use "You can" rather than "Could you" in restaurants?

You can is giving permission. If that is the context - they have asked permission for something - it is fine (though you may is regarded as more polite). But when you are requesting something, you ...
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  • 64.1k
44 votes

Can I use "You can" rather than "Could you" in restaurants?

Server: Are you ready to order? a. Client: Yes. Can you give me hamburger and chips, please? b. Client: Yes. You can give me hamburger and chips (NO) 1 b. To tell someone to give you something,...
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  • 22.4k
34 votes

"How many psychologists does it take to change a light bulb?"

Both of these are perfectly correct. You could also say "How many psychologists are necessary to change a light bulb?" or "How many psychologists are required to change a light bulb?" However, as ...
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31 votes

Can I use "You can" rather than "Could you" in restaurants?

This answer is written from my perspective as an American. I think that usually, saying "you can" is likely to sound rude. If you say "You can get me the check," it may sound like you're ...
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  • 4,930
24 votes

Which is the correct question ("Who has" vs "Who have")?

The OP's question involves the topic of interrogative pronouns (e.g. "who" and "what") and the question of whether they could be considered to be singular or plural. In general, the interrogative ...
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  • 4,910
17 votes
Accepted

Who's that book by? vs. Whom's that book by?

Who's that book by? is 100% natural and common. Whom's that book by? I've never heard it, and it sounds terrible to me, though I suppose technically the grammar is good. Whom is that book by? ...
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  • 14.1k
16 votes

How to ask what time the bank opens

The first and the third are correct, but mean different things: When is the bank open? Answer: Monday to Friday 8am to 6pm. When does the bank open? Answer: Tomorrow at 8am. The first ...
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  • 14.2k
16 votes

Who's that book by? vs. Whom's that book by?

The simplest way to ask that question is: Who wrote that book? The original "Who's that book by?" is a clunky, unnatural construction. You've got the who/whom thing going on as well as ...
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  • 572
14 votes

Which is the correct question ("Who has" vs "Who have")?

Who has already read three English novels? Who is the unspecified grammatical subject of the verb that follows and the usage is to have the verb in the singular. I do say it is based on common usage ...
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  • 5,231
13 votes

"How many psychologists does it take to change a light bulb?"

"It takes x to y" is extremely common, and I'm surprised that you haven't met it before. It is certainly not confined to light-bulb jokes! It means "x is necessary in order to y." Here are some ...
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  • 1,285
11 votes

How to ask what time the bank opens

All three are grammatically correct, but they have different meanings. 1) When is the bank open? This is asking for the hours during which the bank is open. Another way to say this is "What are ...
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  • 1,416
11 votes
Accepted

Should I say: "Where do you live" or "where do you live in"?

"Where" is a word meaning place or location. "In" is superfluous when asking about the location that way. It would be necessary if you asked about a town or district because then you need the ...
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11 votes
Accepted

Is using "ed" (2nd form of verb) with "did" correct in "Did she have us figured out all along?"

The base form of 'have' is correct after 'did'. To 'have something or someone figured out' is a complete verb phrase, and you don't alter 'figured'.
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10 votes
Accepted

Which one is correct in "How can I ..."? VS "How I can ..."

I did not get your question fully, but I think you are confused with the structure of a question - How can I Vs. How I can. I'm answering that way. When asking a question, the pronouns should be ...
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  • 64.8k
10 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between "How about" vs "What about"?

There is some difference in usage between how about and what about. If you are planning something with a friend and you want to raise some potential problem, you would only use what about- ...
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  • 56.2k
10 votes

Do I use 'was' or 'did' as an auxiliary in an interrogative clause?

Because you're using "taste", you need to use "did". Did the cheese taste delicious? However, if you omit "taste", you would use "was". I would argue that this form is much more common because, in ...
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  • 25.2k
10 votes
Accepted

Is "how you do you" grammatical?

Yes and no: it is meaningful, but you have to interpret it in a very specific way. The context is about the difference between -something you know (for example, a password) -something you have (for ...
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  • 34.9k
10 votes

Who's that book by? vs. Whom's that book by?

My school (in rural Australia) never once even mentioned that there were times that "whom" would be a better choice of words, but as I started to encounter the word in the wild I figured out ...
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  • 101
9 votes
Accepted

"Do you know what IS IT?" vs "Do you know what IT IS?"

The rule is: Subordinate questions have no inversion of subject and verb as in independent questions. So the following examples are correct: What is it? (Subject placed after the verb) Do you ...
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  • 8,400
9 votes

"How many psychologists does it take to change a light bulb?"

Yes, because "take" can mean "require." If three psychologists are standing in line, it's like taking one out of the line to change the light bulb. "It" standing for the task. It's informal, but it ...
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9 votes

Is using "ed" (2nd form of verb) with "did" correct in "Did she have us figured out all along?"

Usable grammar: Causative have or get have + object + past participle Using have or get this way is called causative: I had my hair cut. She got the work done. We have our house cleaned every week. ...
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  • 35.4k
8 votes

Difference between "What does that matter?" and "Why does that matter?"

The difference is not as much in the expression itself as in the frequency of its use. In most cases that I've encountered, both expressions are used to imply that something (the topic or the subject ...
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8 votes

"How many psychologists does it take to change a light bulb?"

You appear to have misidentified the subject of the sentence. In questions, word order is often inverted. The subject of the sentence is the word "it," not "many" or "psychologists." The verb must ...
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  • 292
8 votes

Is "how you do you" grammatical?

I agree with the first part of stangdon's answer: The context is about the difference between something you know (for example, a password) something you have (for example, a key) ...
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  • 108k
8 votes
Accepted

"Why do you not give" Vs "Why do not you give"

This is a very simple example of subject–auxiliary inversion, and it is required in most interrogative sentences in English. The subject and the auxiliary verb appear in the reverse of the order in ...
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7 votes

Which is the correct question ("Who has" vs "Who have")?

Only option 1 is correct. -Who here has been to France before? -He has. -I have. Maybe both are correct in the other guys' dialects, but certainly in British English, only your first option is ...
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  • 87
7 votes
Accepted

"What do you think …." constructions

When asking a question like this, think of how you would answer the question. Correct: [What do you think] [my name is]? The answer is, "[My name is] Keiki." [How do you think] [it is done]? ...
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  • 1,025
7 votes

"Guys did anyone of you have found my pencil box today in our class?"

No, this is not grammatically correct. Here are some ways you could modify it to make it so: "Guys, did any one of you find my pencil box today in our class?" (note the space between 'any' and 'one' ...
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7 votes
Accepted

Do I use 'was' or 'did' as an auxiliary in an interrogative clause?

TL;DR; You should use "did", because your main verb is preceded by no auxiliaries. There's a phenomenon in questions called 'subject–auxiliary inversion'. You already probably know what a ...
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  • 7,357

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