13

"that I be" is a good use of the English present subjunctive (which is what I believe you meant when you said "imaginary format"). In this "mood" the verb is always the same as the infinitive: that I be that you be that he/she/it be that we be that they be If you want to use it with "go", it's still the same as the infinitive: that I go that you go that ...


8

In the case of your question, it is interesting that your sentence can actually mean BOTH options. Consider a son talking to his parents about going to college. He doesn't want to go to college, and his parents are trying to convince him otherwise: Parents: A college education will open so many doors for you! It's crucial for getting a job. Son: So ...


5

Well, I think the simple answer is that the author probably made a mistake grammatically. Instead of as if it is somehow inferior, it should be as if it were somehow inferior. In casual English, it's not considered a big error. Frankly, I think a lot of native English speakers don't even know to use were instead of is for hypothetical situations -- or they ...


5

This is an irrealis use, what traditional grammar calls a 'subjunctive': specifically a "condition contrary to fact". The speaker did not in fact see the men laughing but speaks of what he would have done if he had seen it. If I would have seen is not acceptable in formal registers, which does not allow ordinary modal uses of will/would in if (condition) ...


4

Yes, to state a contrary-to-fact (irrealis) situation, native speakers would say as if it were or as if it was. The former is more formal (and sometimes taught as the only correct form). The thing that signals the irrealis here is the use of a past tense, whether were or was. Another example of using as if it was for an irrealis is Live Each Day As ...


3

The difference is the tense used. The second conditional refers to a present unreal event - "If I were you, I would look for a new place to live." The third conditional refers to a past unreal event - "If I had been there, I would have run from the dog."


3

1. Who sent those flowers?- I'm not sure. It could have been your mother. The above is correct written form. There's a lot of latitude with speaking, of course. Here are some alternatives: Who sent these flowers? Couda' been your mother. Who sent these flowers? Maybe your mother? Who sent these flowers? Could be your mother. <- not likely but ...


3

This is annoying, because "Yes, yes" can either mean added emphasis, or dismissal. It's a context and tone thing, which is really difficult to discern in writing; it's much easier to figure out which is meant when you're speaking with someone aloud or in person. Punctuation can help: "Yes, yes! Let's do it!" -> "I am so excited about this I had to say ...


3

No, it's not a plural; it's the simple past subjunctive of "to be", which is "were" for all persons. See my article from earlier today: Subject inversion in the correlative comparative construction, and my article from November 23rd regarding the subjunctive: "If you explained what you ___ trying to achieve, I would ...". Here are some examples ...


1

It's a kind of variation on the third-conditional / hypothetical. It describes a past situation that didn't happen, and the potential consequence if it had happened. Here's how it could be phrased as a standard example of the third conditional: If her father had sold the bows, it would have given the government the idea that her father was arming the ...


1

The instances here are imagined, not real. For imagined situations, "would" is used instead of "will". This is the irrealis or subjunctive mood.


1

It seems to be the subjunctive mood, especially since it's not known as a fact that "you" loves/loved "me". This becomes more clear if you read the sentence instead as: You would support me if you loved me. This page has some nice examples that help understand the different verb moods, and this excerpt seems most relevant: The subjunctive mood can ...


1

This has the form of a past perfect, but it is not actually a past perfect. Keep in mind that the so-called "past tense" form of a verb has two uses: it may express actual past tense OR irrealis ("unreal") modality. But the "past tense" form cannot express both of these: an irrealis "past tense" form expresses present unreality: If Tessa were here now, ...


1

Both sentences are clunky, as you can't "bid" after you've paid someone. I think a better way of saying it is: Once you have won an auction, you must pay within 7 days of the auction closing. If you have not paid for your order within 7 days of the auction closing, your order will be cancelled.


1

Would is used to express verbs that have a conditional meaning. While conditional statements often have signal words like if, then, when, etc. this isn't always the case. Would have, would include, would have all express an action that would exist only if "a guild implies an organization with membership rolls" is true. Must works here and can be ...


1

Since the fragment talks about a hypothetical guild (not a specific one), it uses subjunctive to show the hypothetical characteristics. "Must" is a stronger verb suggesting some kind of higher order, duty of sorts. "Would" indicates a suggestion, a supposition about something that doesn't exist in reality.


1

1 - If + Past tense, subjunctive (irreality) If I had* the necessary money I would buy a new car. (But I don't have the necessary money.) 2 - If + Past Perfect tense, subjunctive (irreality referring to past time) If I had* known how difficult Latin is I would never have begun studying it. In 1 you speak of now, in 2 you speak of something in the past. ...


1

Here's the rules for past perfect. Generally, the concept of past perfect is that you are emphasizing/signifying something happened before something else. If you don't specify that "something else", the listener/reader is expecting to have been told that from earlier sentences or get it from future sentences. They don't change with subjunctive mood. So ...


1

Consider this sentence: If all party-goers were to be sober before being given their car keys, why was K. allowed to drive off without being given a sobriety test? The construction "all were to be {adjective}" expresses a requirement that each and every member of the set "all" had to satisfy. Put an "if" in front of it, "if all were to be sober", and ...


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