14

Context, context, context! Briefly: the simple past is used to narrate past events. The present perfect is used to mention past events which give rise to a present state which is of present interest. The children played in the sandbox for a while, then moved to the swings. At four o'clock their mother called them inside because it looked like rain. ...


11

Because the form is imperative + bare infinitive and not present simple. Same as in: “Let him go”. You wouldn’t say “Let him goes”. In both sentences, go and begin are bare infinitives, not 3rd person singular of present simple. Furthermore the adventure is a subject in the example “The adventure begins”, but in the other one “Let the adventure begin” it ...


9

Here are my tips from one learner to another. There are many ways to learn English. Let's focus on your question, which is about learning to write. The best way to learn might vary from one learner to another. It mostly depends on the learner's background, immediate needs (proficiency tests, jobs, etc.), goals (how perfect they want to be, eventually), and ...


8

You need to do the following things: Create a strong context for the language you are teaching. Make it meaningful and important for them before you teach it. Make sure your students get controlled and also free practice of the target language. Build your syllabus around functions, and - as you have already mentioned - skills for independent and future ...


8

Avoid saying "and" in the middle of a number Bob the zealot is correct that you should avoid saying "and" in the middle of numbers. It is common for Americans to include "and" or "'n" in the middle of a number, especially after the word "hundred". American grade school math teachers discourage this, because it is unclear whether the student has stated a ...


7

1. Rewrite other people’s short sentences Take some text with short sentences and rewrite it so it says everything in one sentence. Children's books are a good source of short sentences. (Well-known children's books are excellent ways to learn a language generally, because they provide the mental "landmarks" that shaped most natives' earliest ...


6

It is "have been". It is basically never correct to say "am been", and it wouldn't mean what you want it to mean anyway. One possible, correct sentence is: I have been, for a short time, an employee of that company. Or (this is more natural for me, but arguably less correct): I have, for a short time, been an employee of that company. Either way, it ...


5

Yes, you can be used for both singular and plural. You can ask that way. However, one way of asking their actual names is asking their real names as this term is used here on FOX NEWS. There are many ways and here's the one: What are your real names? or Your real names, please (a bit informal).


5

I know of no such work; and I suspect that if there were such a work it would be of very little value to you. Complex sentences arise because their authors are trying to express complex thoughts, and in the end what drives the shape of the sentence is not the grammar and syntax of English (or any other language) but the relationships between the various '...


4

My short answer: Don't worry. Here is my longer answer. I was exactly in your shoes in the first few years I started to work with people from other countries. Some of them mentioned that I tended to use too many words. My sentences were too long, and so on. And, if I wanted to say something complex, it was too easy that they will not understand my English ...


4

You can't do better than Dr. Seuss in my opinion. "Hop on Pop" is for very young children. "Green Eggs and Ham" is more challenging, and there are numerous other books at this level. You can go to any children's bookstore or library and look through a large selection. I remember getting "McElligott's Pool" and "One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish" ...


4

I have written elsewhere about our "elaborate codes for acknowledging and regretting the unhappy necessity of imposing burdens on our peers". Anglo-American culture is intensely, almost pugnaciously individualistic. Except in an evident emergency, no one is felt to be entitled to demand a particular action of someone else, and we resent such demands, even ...


4

Oxford Dictionaries sense 7.2 gives: 7.2(with object) Predict the result of (a future event, especially an election or a vote) ‘in the Midlands the race remains too close to call’ ‘few pundits risked calling the election for either Bush or Kerry’ The Urban Dictionary gives: To predict something a while before it happens, and then be credited ...


4

A is for Apple Would be the correct common phrase. This is used in nearly every Elementary School in any English speaking country in order to teach the Alphabet to small children. The meaning is pretty basic, namely that "The word 'Apple' begins with the letter 'A'." The word used to teach each letter to small children varies for some letters, but is ...


3

Yes, "you" can be either singular or plural. The conventional way to ask this question would be: "What are your names?" If you were asking only one person for his name you would day, "What is your name?" (There is a small possible ambiguity if the person has more than one name. Like if someone was a criminal who regularly used fake names, the policeman ...


3

Community wiki answer to compile the suggestions. Songs The Days of the Week - MapleLeafHashima Days of the Week (Adams Family) - Michelle Lebowe Seven Days of the Week (I Never Go to Work) - They Might Be Giants Happy Days Theme Song - Charles Fox (score) and Norman Gimbel (lyrics) Rhymes Monday's Child Poem - Nursery Rhyme Techniques Get 7 index ...


3

In my opinion, as much as you can handle but always in relation to something you read or study. However, the most important is to use that vocabulary in writing or speaking.


3

I know from personal experience that, after living and working in Germany for four years (with a good knowledge of the language when I arrived), I read newspapers and books and enjoyed films without translating into my native English. I don't think I had any thoughts in English When I spoke with German colleagues, but it is difficult to be absolutely certain....


3

Three ideas ​1. Read something easier. Legal writing is among the most difficult, confusing, and often painfully ambiguous writing in English. In English, there is a well-known proverb: "You have to crawl before you can walk, and you have to walk before you can run." Translated into a maxim for learning a skill, that would be: "Crawl before you walk, walk ...


3

You're not going to like this answer, because there is no quick way to learn it. You're going to have to read. Read a lot. Read at a higher level than the average news article. I have built up an intuition for the vocab by seeing thousands of examples in text.


3

Some people believe phonics is a good way to teach people to read English. Otherrs, including me, disagree. But it was developed to teach people in English speaking environments to read English. It is not a method designed to teach English pronunciation. So whether or not phonics is a good way to teach English speakers to read English, it is irrelevant ...


2

When I was taking a Legal Writing class towards a Paralegal degree our attorney instructor always recommended the classic sitcom Frasier to help build vocabulary and general use of high level English. The dialogue is expansive and rich, infused with lots of "GRE" words as many call them these days.


2

The answer to this can vary dramatically based on what form of english you are trying to improve: conversational, educational, political, etc... Generally, news broadcasts have wide varieties of speech that would be useful and would run the whole gamut. Many educational youtube 'shows' might also be helpful. Perhaps the various Crash Course series on ...


2

Like the comments say, it'll take time and persistence -- especially if y'all aren't in a country where you're surrounded by 90%-95% spoken English. The best advice I can offer from my own experience learning my second languages is, as soon as she makes an error, correct her on it. It may get obnoxious, but if they're cemented into how she uses English, ...


2

I would start with something on his level. I think if you got him a book he would look at it and then get bored with it quickly (just my opinion with my own son but every kid is different, take it or leave it) www.pbskids.org is a wonderful website. It is a public access station here locally that has educational only programming. Even though it will all be ...


2

My brother is dyslexic and I've read and thought about the issue a lot. I also have experience learning 4 different languages to varying degrees of fluency. Also my dyslexic brother has learned a language with good success. So don't despair. Is there any fundamental reason you need to push through the mud of dyslexia right away. I use that term not ...


2

Most English speakers would say: "What are your given names?" In English, your given name would be something like "John Lee Doe" or "Susan" or "Maria Anne". People take it to mean different things, but you will always get the answer you are looking for. I believe that the given name is supposed to mean your first name (Susan, Mary, John, Greg). We also use ...


2

I found this in Google under "writing diplomatically." I found this under "writing tactfully and effectively." I would recommend you conduct your own searches with these terms and see what comes up.


2

I don't know if companies in whatever country she is looking for a job in require some formal certification. But here in the U.S., the best way to prove her knowledge of English on a CV (or resume as we call it) is to make sure that she uses good English on the CV itself! I've reviewed many CVs with very obviously poor English, like "I working the four years ...


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