14

Context, context, context! Briefly: the simple past is used to narrate past events. The present perfect is used to mention past events which give rise to a present state which is of present interest. The children played in the sandbox for a while, then moved to the swings. At four o'clock their mother called them inside because it looked like rain. The ...


11

Because the form is imperative + bare infinitive and not present simple. Same as in: “Let him go”. You wouldn’t say “Let him goes”. In both sentences, go and begin are bare infinitives, not 3rd person singular of present simple. Furthermore the adventure is a subject in the example “The adventure begins”, but in the other one “Let the adventure begin” it ...


8

Here are my tips from one learner to another. There are many ways to learn English. Let's focus on your question, which is about learning to write. The best way to learn might vary from one learner to another. It mostly depends on the learner's background, immediate needs (proficiency tests, jobs, etc.), goals (how perfect they want to be, eventually), and ...


8

You need to do the following things: Create a strong context for the language you are teaching. Make it meaningful and important for them before you teach it. Make sure your students get controlled and also free practice of the target language. Build your syllabus around functions, and - as you have already mentioned - skills for independent and future ...


8

Avoid saying "and" in the middle of a number Bob the zealot is correct that you should avoid saying "and" in the middle of numbers. It is common for Americans to include "and" or "'n" in the middle of a number, especially after the word "hundred". American grade school math teachers discourage this, because it is unclear whether the student has stated a ...


7

1. Rewrite other people’s short sentences Take some text with short sentences and rewrite it so it says everything in one sentence. Children's books are a good source of short sentences. (Well-known children's books are excellent ways to learn a language generally, because they provide the mental "landmarks" that shaped most natives' earliest ...


6

It is "have been". It is basically never correct to say "am been", and it wouldn't mean what you want it to mean anyway. One possible, correct sentence is: I have been, for a short time, an employee of that company. Or (this is more natural for me, but arguably less correct): I have, for a short time, been an employee of that company. Either way, it ...


5

Yes, you can be used for both singular and plural. You can ask that way. However, one way of asking their actual names is asking their real names as this term is used here on FOX NEWS. There are many ways and here's the one: What are your real names? or Your real names, please (a bit informal).


5

I know of no such work; and I suspect that if there were such a work it would be of very little value to you. Complex sentences arise because their authors are trying to express complex thoughts, and in the end what drives the shape of the sentence is not the grammar and syntax of English (or any other language) but the relationships between the various '...


5

It's being used as a compound, most plausibly as a model of toilet: We have improved our Comfort RideTM toilet by adding a heated seat. This is a common formula for branding an otherwise generic-sounding product. Now introducing our Click DreamTM gaming mouse with twenty-seven programmable buttons. One might well ask whether there's an internal logic to &...


4

You can't do better than Dr. Seuss in my opinion. "Hop on Pop" is for very young children. "Green Eggs and Ham" is more challenging, and there are numerous other books at this level. You can go to any children's bookstore or library and look through a large selection. I remember getting "McElligott's Pool" and "One Fish, Two Fish, Red Fish, Blue Fish" ...


4

My short answer: Don't worry. Here is my longer answer. I was exactly in your shoes in the first few years I started to work with people from other countries. Some of them mentioned that I tended to use too many words. My sentences were too long, and so on. And, if I wanted to say something complex, it was too easy that they will not understand my English ...


4

In my opinion, the television news shows may be too fast paced with too many verbal shortcuts to be good sources to listen to. To start with, you may want to try audio books where what is being spoken comes from a written text. I think that it isn't the accent that is problematic as much as the content and pace of the speaking. There are some British movies ...


4

I have written elsewhere about our "elaborate codes for acknowledging and regretting the unhappy necessity of imposing burdens on our peers". Anglo-American culture is intensely, almost pugnaciously individualistic. Except in an evident emergency, no one is felt to be entitled to demand a particular action of someone else, and we resent such demands, even ...


4

Oxford Dictionaries sense 7.2 gives: 7.2(with object) Predict the result of (a future event, especially an election or a vote) ‘in the Midlands the race remains too close to call’ ‘few pundits risked calling the election for either Bush or Kerry’ The Urban Dictionary gives: To predict something a while before it happens, and then be credited ...


4

A is for Apple Would be the correct common phrase. This is used in nearly every Elementary School in any English speaking country in order to teach the Alphabet to small children. The meaning is pretty basic, namely that "The word 'Apple' begins with the letter 'A'." The word used to teach each letter to small children varies for some letters, but is ...


4

The phrase is a reference to 'Slip Slidin' Away', a famous 1978 song by Simon and Garfunkel. The use of 'slip' and 'sliding' is an example of poetic repetition, common in songs and poems. One action or event is described by two words instead of one. Slip Sidin' Away (YouTube)


3

Yes, "you" can be either singular or plural. The conventional way to ask this question would be: "What are your names?" If you were asking only one person for his name you would day, "What is your name?" (There is a small possible ambiguity if the person has more than one name. Like if someone was a criminal who regularly used fake names, the policeman ...


3

Community wiki answer to compile the suggestions. Songs The Days of the Week - MapleLeafHashima Days of the Week (Adams Family) - Michelle Lebowe Seven Days of the Week (I Never Go to Work) - They Might Be Giants Happy Days Theme Song - Charles Fox (score) and Norman Gimbel (lyrics) Rhymes Monday's Child Poem - Nursery Rhyme Techniques Get 7 index ...


3

I know from personal experience that, after living and working in Germany for four years (with a good knowledge of the language when I arrived), I read newspapers and books and enjoyed films without translating into my native English. I don't think I had any thoughts in English When I spoke with German colleagues, but it is difficult to be absolutely certain....


3

Three ideas ​1. Read something easier. Legal writing is among the most difficult, confusing, and often painfully ambiguous writing in English. In English, there is a well-known proverb: "You have to crawl before you can walk, and you have to walk before you can run." Translated into a maxim for learning a skill, that would be: "Crawl before you walk, walk ...


3

You're not going to like this answer, because there is no quick way to learn it. You're going to have to read. Read a lot. Read at a higher level than the average news article. I have built up an intuition for the vocab by seeing thousands of examples in text.


3

Some people believe phonics is a good way to teach people to read English. Otherrs, including me, disagree. But it was developed to teach people in English speaking environments to read English. It is not a method designed to teach English pronunciation. So whether or not phonics is a good way to teach English speakers to read English, it is irrelevant ...


3

Yes, it definitely can improve your English; however, Harry Potter is a tough book to read, so I'd start out small if I were you. There are very tough idioms and strange grammatical structures in Harry Potter. J.K. Rowling has a penchant for archaisms and odd constructions. I have read some of her Harry Potter books and I can recall her using oddities ...


3

Telling you the best way to learn new vocab would be entirely opinion-based. However, I can suggest alternatives to and offer advice on the standard answer of looking in a dictionary. A dictionary won't tell you how popular or unpopular a word is. If a non-native speaker finds a new word in a dictionary or thesaurus they might even find themselves using a ...


3

The construction "bought [a car] [to somebody]" is not idiomatic. It doesn't really have a meaning. It is idiomatic to say "I bought a car from my sister", which means that your sister sold you a car. This is because "bought" implies that the object comes towards the buyer. But sold means it goes away. So you say "The car ...


3

“Plate tectonics” is correct. The phrase does not describe an object, but a science dealing with a certain kind of geological process, involving the interactions of large chunks of a planet’s crust as they ‘float’ on the mantle.


3

This is a reference to a song, called "The Candyman" From Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory (1971) (and not related to the horror film) Who can take a sunrise, Sprinkle it in dew, Cover it in chocolate and a miracle or two? The candyman! The candyman can. The song has the form of a list of things that the owner of the candy store can do. ...


3

No, that would not carry the meaning you want. Your intention would not be understandable. A "forgiving person" is a person who forgives, not one who is themselves forgiven. You could say: She deserves forgiveness. She is worthy of forgiveness. She deserves to be forgiven. She ought to be forgiven. She should get a second chance. etc.


3

You need to understand that this is an example of irony. It is meant to be ridiculous, and so funny. It is not meant to be understood literally. It imagines, humorously that you will have a conversation like this with your spouse: Spouse: Why are you drunk again!? You: (drunkenly) I am not drunk! Thish ish a sherious schientfic shtudy of the merits of ...


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