162

The term is "grand theft" and the category it goes into (based on what is being stolen) is "auto". Grand theft, also called grand larceny, designates theft that is large in magnitude or serious in penological consequences. Grand theft is contrasted with petty theft, theft that is of smaller magnitude or lesser seriousness. What constitutes "grand theft" ...


88

The confusing term seems to be "respecting". This is a somewhat different meaning of "respect", that is still in common use: respecting (prep): in view of : considering with respect to : concerning The first amendment states that Congress shall pass no law related to (or with regard to) the establishment of a (state) religion. This has ...


51

Regarding the primary meaning, there's probably no semantic difference worth noting, so OP's example is effectively tautological repetition for stylistic purposes. In terms of actual usage, note that "to rob" is becoming increasingly less common - so if you're unsure which to use, go for "to steal" by default. The main syntactic difference is probably best ...


39

In English, we can move the head of noun phrase, which normally appears at the end, to the beginning. This helps with the naming systems used in technical jargons and other situation in which we want to put the general category on the left, and the particular category on the right. In writing, we usually put in a comma when this reversal happens. So for ...


34

In the United States, when writing a check, it's customary to write and 00/100 or and no/100 or and xx/100 before "dollars" to indicate that no cents are to be added beyond the indicated number of dollars. Sometimes people also follow this custom when writing a contract. The "/100" refers to cents, since there are 100 cents in a dollar. Sometimes people ...


28

The bolded phrase in your question is expressed in an archaic negative - it is saying that Congress is prohibited from making any laws that promote an Established Religion (which is a phrase commonly used to mean the same thing as “an official church”). If the Constitution were first being written today, it might have been written as “...


27

The earliest reference to the phrase that Google has on hand is from the Los Angeles Police department's annual report in 1936. It makes a lot of sense that this could have been one of the first uses: the Model T had only been on the market for about twenty years at this point in time. Car theft was quite likely a very new crime, and Los Angeles -- among ...


22

One detail you might be missing is that I-70 is the name of a major interstate highway which travels across most of the country. I would say that most Americans are at least somewhat familiar with the route. Another thing that might be tripping you up is the author's use of "just east". "Just" in this case means "exactly" or "directly"- "Just East" can be ...


19

Not only is wherein a more archaic term, but it actually has a different meaning than where. It means "in which", and is primarily used as a flowery term evoking legal language, or a fancy or pretentious-sounding table of contents in a book. (e.g. "Chapter 2: Wherein Christopher Robin Meets a Heffalump and Pooh Does Not") The grammatically correct ...


19

In this case, "respecting" is equivalent to "with respect to" or "concerning": with/in respect to In reference or relation to; concerning: thefreedictionary.com So this phrase may be understood as Congress shall make no law concerning an establishment of religion ... or, more simply, Congress shall make no law about an establishment of religion ...


16

According to the legal dictionary at lectlaw.com, the technical, legal definition of "steal" is that it is the general term for any unlawful taking of another person's property, while "rob" specifically means taking by violence or threat of violence. So I believe @kasperd is correct when speaking in technical, legal terms. By the way, another law ...


15

It sounds like someone forgot to finish the sign... A sign that says that a sidewalk is to be closed "on or about" is probably meant to have someone write in the date "on or about" which the sidewalk is to be closed. In normal usage, the phrase "on or about" is followed by a date and has the same meaning as "approximately." If a sign says that a sidewalk ...


15

The difference is simply location. In the UK, New Zealand and Australia, there are two types of legal professionals, solicitors and barristers. More about the difference between these. Both of these are types of lawyers. In the US, there is no distinction. All legal professionals with a particular degree are called lawyers (or attorneys). A lawyer will ...


14

There is quite a difference, both in the denotation and the connotation, at least in US usage. (Being an American speaker, I can't say for certain what differences might exist overseas.) "Wage" refers to payment in exchange for work for a particular period of time. In most American work arrangements, a person who's paid a wage is going to be paid hourly. ...


13

Heir apparent here is a fixed phrase. It is a legal term and descends from the two or three centuries after the Norman Conquest when laws were written and legal proceedings conducted in a variety of French, which ordinarily postposes its adjectives. Heir apparent does not mean "seems/seemed to be the heir" but "is/was the heir". The heir apparent is the ...


12

"Misuse" has a generally less severe connotation than "abuse." Abuse would usually be something that someone does intentionally or without regard for consequences, while misuse is more likely to be unintentional. The meaning is the same in the humanities, sociology, legal studies, and all other fields.


12

The key here is Heavy Noun Phrase Shift. Here's how it works: First, let's start with the canonical (declarative, affirmative) version: [The person who acts upon this advertisement and accepts the offer]subject puts himself to some inconvenience at the request of the defendants. Then we'll add the dummy auxiliary do. We need this auxiliary for two ...


11

It's not short for anything. It's a direct instruction. When forming a basic imperative, instructing someone to do an action, we just use the verb form directly, possibly with an exclamation mark: Run! Stop! Come back! This is the case whether we are instructing someone specific or people in general to perform the action. But when we construct a sentence ...


11

I would like to instruct you is both polite and formal. Modern English has no alternate pronoun forms to denote politeness, formality or etiquette; it's correct to translate both tu and vous (and their nominative forms as well; you serves both functions) as you. Instead, in English we can use different verb constructions to show politeness, similar to using ...


10

I think in this case prove this otherwise means prove this in another way. I would paraphase the first sentence like this: a purchaser may prove affectation by producing an appropriate written statement And the second sentence like this: the purchaser could prove this in another manner, by directly giving evidence In any case, it's not clear ...


9

The authors of the Oxford Learner's Thesaurus argue that "compulsory is used especially in the contexts of education, business, and employment. Mandatory is used especially in the context of the law. Obligatory is often used to talk about rules and laws relating to safety, for example in sport or the workplace." The authors of the Longman Collocations ...


8

The two can be used synonymously, but there is generally a difference at least of degree between them, and often of intended meaning. To "misuse" is "to use incorrectly". For example, if you take a screwdriver and try to use it to paint a picture, you are misusing it; the screwdriver is not designed for painting, and will not do a good job when pressed into ...


8

Premises means building or property - in this case, the building or property where this theft occurred; see the Cambridge definition here. Press charges, meanwhile, means "to complain officially about someone in a law court" (Cambridge definition here) - the addition of "full" suggests doing as much as possible in legal terms to seek punishment for the ...


8

If you mean something that's determined in court, it would be a finding of fact, or just finding, as opposed to a conclusion of law or a ruling. Findings often involve more than finding of fact - a jury verdict is a finding, even where it's just guilty or not guilty. However, they will always be based on questions of fact, to which the law may have been ...


7

Dictionaries can be confusing. Most of the definitions I found defined the verb grandfather in terms of ‘exempting’ someone from a regulation or ‘excluding’ someone from liability under a regulation. That's not inaccurate; but it doesn't really describe how the word is actually used. As the answers at the ELU question Hellion ...


7

to kill/killing Most basic/versatile expression. to murder/murder Implies the voluntary killing of a sentient being. In US law, there is a distinction between "murder" (intentionally killing someone) vs. "manslaughter" (unintentionally killing a person); murder is considered even worse. Depending on the context, "murder" may have a sense of cruelty. ...


7

The sentence is a question. It is difficult to read, even for a native speaker, so let's consider what it asks, one piece at a time: At the time of your entry to UA, will you have been... The question asks about a condition being true at the time you enter UA. The condition might be true now (at the time of your application) or you might expect it to ...


6

Commuted refers to it being reduced to a less severe punishment. Waived refers to it being changed to not happening at all. This therefore refers to changes in punishment that make it less severe. Lenient punishment means the punishment is less severe but has always been as such i.e. no change.


6

"Compensation" is a payment you make to someone for damage you have caused them. ("Compensation" can also mean a payment for work done, like the salary you are paid by your employer is "compensation".) "Indemnity" has two very distinct meanings. It can mean the same thing as compensation: money paid for damages. But I ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible