68

*"Haley found remark disrespectful" is ungrammatical, so you'd be unlikely to hear a native speaker say it. What you're likely hearing is the "the" being reduced, likely with almost no vowel sound. Sometimes the "th" might sound more like a "d", as well. e.g., a native speaker might pronounce it like either of the following, in casual speech: Haley ...


48

It's pronounced /spel/ in the audio clip. Phonemically, English has two bilabial plosive consonants, /b/ and /p/. Phonetically, these two sounds can be realized in more than one way. The relevant ones to our question are [b] (for /b/), and [pʰ] and [p˭] (for /p/). [b] is voiced. [pʰ] is aspirated and unvoiced. [p˭] is unaspirated and unvoiced. The ...


41

I'm a native English speaker, and we do say the "The" It's true that if you are speaking quickly it will all get blended together, but we definitely don't omit it.


26

"We are going on tour two weeks from now" means "it is arranged that our tour starts two weeks from now". This provides information about how far in the future the departure is. "I'll be gone the entire week" provides information about the duration of the speaker's absence. There is no conflict. A person who correctly understands (comprehends) the ...


18

It is a clear question, and there is enough information to answer it. I'm going on tour two weeks from now This tell you when she is leaving. The tour will start after two weeks. I'll be gone the whole week. This tells you how long someone will be gone. It tells you explicitly that she will be gone for one whole week. Comprehension questions ...


16

Yes, the character says, "Last time I checked." It's a stock phrase that means, essentially: "If I remember correctly..." It's usually said with a least a moderate bit of sarcasm. For example, if someone new at work asked me: What time does our lunch break start? I would not say: Last time I checked, lunch starts at noon. However, if a co-worker ...


12

In my dialect (British, West Midlands), it actually comes out as: "Hayley foun' the remark disrespectful." The D in found is very, very heavily reduced in this sentence. In fact, forcing myself to enunciate the D as well as the "The" seems really unnatural. Perhaps this is why a non-native speaker could miss the different sounds? But regardless, the ...


11

The accepted answer by Damkerng is an excellent explanation, but I think it is also helpful to understand why it is pronounced this way, and as a native speaker of English I'd be happy to explain. In English we always strive for efficiency in pronunciation, and if we aspirated the /p/ as [ph] after such sounds as /s/, it would be rather difficult to do so in ...


9

Being honest, I as a native speaker (seriously) rarely understand more than 50% of the lyrics the first time I listen to a song. What's more, I don't understand more than 80% of the lyrics of even my favorite songs (after listening over and over) unless I look up the lyrics (check genius or songmeanings for generally excellent sources). Again, I'm a native ...


9

It's almost impossible for native speakers to articulate the consonants /k/ /d/ /t in rapid succession with no intervening voiced vowel (even though some might think they do). So in practice it's not worth trying to hear (or reproduce) a difference, because there usually isn't one. Just do the same as native speakers, and rely on context to tell you what ...


9

Native speakers don't "omit" the entire word, but many of them will strongly de-emphasize the vowel sound in the and essentially merge it with the start of the next word. It's not quite an elision of the syllable, because you can still hear it, but it's very fast and nearly omitted. Typically this happens if the following word starts with an unstressed ...


8

By the way I listen to rap musics because I believe they come handy while improving listening comprehension There's a strong tradition in rap music (and other popular music as well) of intentionally mispronouncing, twisting, or even inventing words to maintain the flow of a song. It's technically poetry after all, and poetry bends the rules of grammar and ...


7

I love you. "It's me who loves you." This would be said in the context where you're contrasting with someone else: "He likes you, but I love you!" I love you. You're emphasizing the fact that it's love, rather than anything else. This is also the emphasis you would use if you want to emphasize the whole sentence. For example: "I'm ...


7

Others have already given good answers, but for what it is worth, I'm an U.S. speaker and would naturally say "Haley foun' the remark disrespectful" just like @Psiloc mentioned. But I would guess many Americans would also say "Haley foun da remark disrespectful" where "the" almost sounds like "da" attached to "found".


6

What Liam Gallagher is about to say is Shall I tell you what gets on my tits? get on someone’s tits - to annoy someone a lot (macmillandictionary) ...but because he knows he's on the radio, he balks at coming out with such a coarse turn of phrase, so what he actually says is Shall I tell you what gets on my ...er... thingies? Note that this is very much ...


5

I agree wholeheartedly with J.R.'s answer. I just wanted to explain in more detail the literal meaning of "Last time I checked". Let's say I lock the door at 1:00. An hour later, it's now 2:00. I'm not sure if the door is still locked. Maybe someone used a key to unlock it. Maybe someone picked the lock and broke in illegally. I don't know. So I check ...


5

Lyric sheets online say both, so until I can get home and check my original CD (assuming I can find it) I couldn't say for certain. Listening to now, the first line is sounds to me like: "Teachers leave them kids alone!" and the following: "Hey! Teacher! Leave those kids alone!" The thing is, it doesn't really matter in this context whether it is ...


5

It's much more likely the piece of dialogue is as follows: ... if you think I am really so naive as to be fooled by another one of your tricks! Meaning: ... If you think I am so naive that I would be fooled by another one of your tricks! In fact, I just listened to it and my take is correct.


5

What he actually says is "There are so many great features on phones - on devices - that let us liminate - uh, eliminate - a lot of time we waste on devices." He was speaking quickly and accidentally mispronounced eliminate. He then repeated himself with a correction. The auto-generated closed captions picked the mispronunciation up as "lemonade".


5

If you do a web search for 'lyrics sayonara means goodbye' you'll find a lot of sites giving the lyrics. They all (the 5 or so I checked) have live and not leave. However, these sites are quite often sourced by random internet people - that is, they do not have any 'official' status. The only way to find out, I think, is to find out who the publisher is, ...


4

In my opinion, the television news shows may be too fast paced with too many verbal shortcuts to be good sources to listen to. To start with, you may want to try audio books where what is being spoken comes from a written text. I think that it isn't the accent that is problematic as much as the content and pace of the speaking. There are some British movies ...


4

"Her mum's agreed to help out, just until I get hard". I'll expand on that if you want an explanation.


4

Your hearing of her pronunciation is correct, the words of her song were: If you want it, take it. I shoulda said it before. Tried to hide it, fake it. I can't pretend anymore. But her pronunciation matched "try to" the way that American English speakers actually pronounce the words, almost as one word, try-da. Unfortunately it is very similar to ...


4

"Sesame Street: Bert and Ernie in a Pyramid". Video Clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8yiqGtZXCmQ (0:22) I hear Bert say the following: "This pyramid is...ahh must be centuries...and thousands even of years old, this is great!" The "ahh" is typically written as hmm or um and is considered to be a filler word. To illustrate meaning, it could be ...


4

My experience: Does listening to same clips over and over again help or I should listen to new one once I am done with previous one? As long as you understand a certain clip, move on. The more word patterns and vocalizations you learn, the better. How many times at least should I listen to audio files per day? (How long time should I spend per day?) ...


4

I suspect there are three distinct problems here: The narrator has a British accent. If you are only used to American accents, there are distinct differences. Words beginning with vowels often mush into the word before them. Often-used conjunctions are not enunciated properly. (e.g. "Fish 'n' Chips") Suggestions? It sounds like the narrator is David ...


4

She is saying: "But it takes six to tango I guess in this case." A common similar phrase to get the meaning is: It takes two to tango. See Wikipedia Takes two to tango (idiom): It takes two to tango is a common idiomatic expression which suggests something in which more than one person or other entity are paired in an inextricably-related and ...


4

Normally you wouldn't hear the difference, but a careful speaker might pronounce the 't' as a double consonant, i.e. hold the dental stop a trifle longer for 'walked to' than 'walk to'. Compare the double consonant sound 'n' in 'penknife', for example. If there had been a misunderstanding and the speaker was emphasising the past tense, they might make a ...


4

I also hear "Also could you bring the file on the Rx accounts?" and the information you have provided is accurate. The speaker is making a request. She is asking the secretary for the file "on Rx accounts". I also hear "Rx", but I am not convinced that this is correct. It might be some kind of special business lingo, a surname or a fake company name like "...


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