Hot answers tagged

35

Oxford lists three primary meanings for the word grow. The first two reflect what we often immediately think of when we think about growing: grow (v.) to undergo natural development by increasing in size and changing physically grow (v.) to become larger or greater over a period of time; to increase It’s the third meaning, though, that provides the ...


32

Grow and smaller aren't linked the way you are interpreting it. The sentence is saying that fish that used to reach a certain size in adulthood aren't growing that big in a warmer ocean, they are smaller than their predecessors.


13

You are correct and I would say it's a trick question. The passage only talks about lead instruments replaced by guitar in the 1950's, but this does not mean that the guitar was not used at all in the 1940's. Please tell your tutor that I said he needs to work on his critical reading skills.


10

As well as the common usage of grow to increase in size it can also be used to indicate a gradual or progressive change of state for example As night fell it began to grow colder. Having said that using the phrase 'grow' smaller is probably best avoided as it is a bit ambiguous as it is not clear whether it means they actually shrink or they just grow ...


6

This question doesn't really have anything to do with the weather when you come down to it. I wish it was warmer today. "Warmer" does not mean "colder" if the temperature is above a given definition of "warm." It means that the temperature should be higher than it currently is. If the person wants warm, but not hot weather while on a hot day, they might ...


6

Identify unnecessary or vague ‘filler’ words. Are you defining the idea behind the process? —It appears that what you are really doing is describing what the process does. What does common mean here? Common to what? —it appears to mean that it includes the outer ends of all the lines. Pin down what's left that needs to be defined in detail. In ...


5

It does sound rather odd, but it is actually correct. Imagine that you are using a car to travel through the desert. On most compact cars (in the US, anyway) the fuel tank is 10-12 gallons (~37 - ~45 litres.) Generally speaking, this is enough to travel ~350 miles (560 km.) Thus, the maximum amount of fuel will take the car a certain distance. But let us ...


4

An expansion: Jo Counsell ... concedes that such [highly ambitious] parents exist. "But because we are a support organisation, [such parents] don't tend to approach us. Most of our parents [i.e., the ones who do approach us] are quite the opposite [of the aforementioned such parents] - embarrassed to be calling us at all." She's saying that highly ...


4

I agree with BobRodes that this is expressed with colloquial looseness. But I think that what has happened is that Ms. Counsell has omitted the polar terms in the “opposition” she discerns. What she probably means is something like: Most of the children we see have parents of a quite different sort. They tend not to approach us; if they call us at all, ...


4

Since your condition matching is either...or case, the given three sentences can be merged as follows: The idea behind the process is to find a common envelope which should either be going through the longest line's outer end or accommodate all the lines' outer ends on to that.


4

These questions about English dates and times come up very often. Unfortunately, unless the sentence specifies an exact date and time, the correct answer is always going to be, "You have to ask to be sure." Technically, yes, midnight December 10 is one second after 23:59:59 on December 9th. However, in practice most people consider the day to "end" ...


4

Note that this question might be off-topic here as it is also about logic, though personally I think the question is fine staying on ELL. The question asks Which of the following is an error of reasoning contained in the argument? It asks you to choose from the options a statement that describes a fallacy in the original text. You seem to be looking for ...


4

It is correct as written. All the tests came back with negative results showing that there was no infection, save for three alone which came back positive indicating that there was an infection in those three. A positive virus-testing result means that the virus was detected. A negative virus-testing result means that the test for the virus failed to find ...


3

Many natives are firmly convinced that "if" and "whether" are interchangeable, which is not true. Some natives only use "if," which is wrong. Word to the wise: there are lots and lots of native English speakers out there; not all of them are geniuses. Some of them are pretty ... uh ... but I digress. A wether is a castrated male sheep. The word you have in ...


3

Generally speaking, you need a separate "negative polarity" element in your sentence (or your multi-sentence thought) to trigger the use of nor. These would be words such as No, not, never, nothing, or neither; a negating prefix like ir-, non- or de- is not enough to make a nor show up in standard use. So you could say A is irrelevant to either B ...


3

This question can be answered logically. A is irrelevant to B and C. or (more awkwardly): A is relevant to neither B nor C.


3

I think there is a difference between the two sentences. When you use or you mean one of them, but when you use and you mean all of them. It depends on your situation which one of them you need.


3

Since you mention "syllogism" I'll treat this a sentences in formal logic, rather than natural language. "All policemen are not honest" is equivalent to "The set of policemen is a subset of the set of not honest things" or, since "not honest" and "honest" are mutually exclusive, it is equivalent to "the set of honest policemen is empty" In regular language ...


3

Gene is definitely a countable word, as it says in the dictionary: gene /dʒiːn/ noun [countable] The paragraph says the gene, so it means that there is one gene which is responsible because gene is singular, and the statement in the question says one less gene because there was one. Everything is consistent about the paragraph and the question. If ...


3

A seller has to buy or make what he/she sells to others. If the seller buys his products, he will want to buy them at a lower price than what he sells them to others, the difference being his profit. So I am understanding this: Suppose buyers in the used-car market value good cars—“peaches”—at $1,000, and sellers at slightly less. to mean that if a ...


3

"Better sooner than later" is already an abbreviation of the full phrase, so it's more common to use it in an abbreviated sentence where the context is already known: I told him better sooner than later. Otherwise if you have to explain the context, it's more natural to include more detail: I told him, if you're going to send that letter, then sooner ...


3

The answer is false. The passage of text talks about the piano or saxophone being the lead instrument, but then says they were "replaced or supplemented by the guitar in the middle to late 1950s." If it only said "replaced", then you could make an argument for "not given", because the piano or saxophone being replaced by the guitar as the lead instrument ...


2

I would advise more on the usage of the first one. Since you are finally going to use only one algorithm for your search (as depicted by "using a search algorithm") you'd be using or in your sentence. On the other hand, if you are choosing/providing a list, using and will be correct in that situation. For this, the construction should be something like ...


2

Argument may be either plural, if you are distinguishing several arguments, or singular, if you are speaking of a coherent presentation (which may include many subpoints) tending to a single main point. Only propositions may be true or false in this sense. An argument is usually valid or invalid, and a position or viewpoint or the person holding it is ...


2

There is a subtle difference between 'given' and 'due to'. It depends on where you want the emphasis: A sentence structured as: 'due to this, that happens' puts the emphasis on this.A sentence structured as 'given that this happens, that happens' puts the emphasis on that. You can't really use 'being' here in any sophisticated way, so you should stick with ...


2

There are two main meanings of correspondence that come to mind: two things exacty lining up messages exchanged between two things The first case includes things like "His rise in blood pressure exactly corresponded to when he eat salty pretzels." (So "there is a correspondence between his rise in blood pressure and when he eats salty pretzels.") "The ...


2

As oerlekens says, it means that the speaker's ugliness is less than or equal to that of your sister. It's an unusual comparison to make. I suppose if the other person had just said, "Wow, you're even uglier than my sister", this would be a response that makes sense. A more common phrasing would be, "I am not as ugly as your sister" or "I am less ugly than ...


2

Unfortunately, English does not always work in an entirely logical way, especially with 'logic words'. From a logical standpoint, "3 is not a factor of m or of n" should mean 3 is not a factor of m, OR 3 is not a factor of n. 3 might be a factor of m, and it might be a factor of n, but it is not a factor of both. and "3 is not a factor of m ...


2

The opposite of "C did it" is "C didn't do it." By contrast, the opposite of B's seconds statement, "I know C did it" is "I don't know whether/if/that C did it." It is possible that C did it but B did not know about it; therefore, C can be guilty while B's second statement is false.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible