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18

Bend is a much more common word than Bow. There are several related words written "bow" There is is /bau/ rhyming with cow (noun, verb) which is a lowering your body to show humility, for example before a King. There is /bau/ (noun) The front part of a boat. There is /bou/ rhyming with know (noun) a knot made with loops of string, for example to tie up ...


14

The statement in the song is analogous to "no more hellos" where the word "hello", used in greeting, has become the name for such a greeting. It has become nominalized. We say our hellos and our goodbyes. The phrase "I love you" is similarly being turned into a noun that stands for the profession of love, and the noun is being pluralized. No more I ...


11

Not bow! Bow! You are being caught by a homograph. The Bridge does not bow (rhymes with "cow"); it bows (rhymes with "lows"). It bends under tension, like an archer's bow. A bend could be a sharp bend, a graceful bend, a zig-zag bend, anything. It could be natural to the bent item, or it could have been caused by impact, heat, gravity, anything. It ...


9

It's intentional. Eminem is using street language (where the word street refers to “of or relating to the urban counterculture”). Misconjugated verbs are part of street language; in a rap song, the idea would be to use a wrong verb deliberately, creating the impression that the lyrics are being rapped by some tough guy who “don't” care about his grammar so ...


9

Being honest, I as a native speaker (seriously) rarely understand more than 50% of the lyrics the first time I listen to a song. What's more, I don't understand more than 80% of the lyrics of even my favorite songs (after listening over and over) unless I look up the lyrics (check genius or songmeanings for generally excellent sources). Again, I'm a native ...


9

May a flea-bitten dog be your best friend. A dog bitten by fleas. the Heav'n-rescued land The land rescued by Heaven. rescued is the past-participle there.


8

"Drinking", without an object, is usually taken as referring to alcohol. So "drinking the pain away" means drinking so much alcohol that the pain goes away somehow - by being forgotten, being surpassed by some other drunken activity, or some other method of numbing the pain.


8

By the way I listen to rap musics because I believe they come handy while improving listening comprehension There's a strong tradition in rap music (and other popular music as well) of intentionally mispronouncing, twisting, or even inventing words to maintain the flow of a song. It's technically poetry after all, and poetry bends the rules of grammar and ...


8

the flat simply means a flat tire. When you get a flat tire (or just a flat) on your car, there's no air in it and you can't drive (maybe you could but it would be difficult for the car to move and most likely illegal among other things). I guess, the idea here is that a deflated automobile tire actually looks flat in the area where it touches the ground, ...


7

The term "footloose" means free to travel, and by extension free from responsibilities. It is commonly encountered in the archaic idiom "footloose and fancy free," or "free to travel and not tied down by romantic attachment." The song lyric you're quoting is...well, it's a song lyric, which means it doesn't have to make perfect grammatical sense. Nobody ...


7

Repetition of sense for emphasis or ornament is quite common in popular genres, and at one time was admired even in very formal registers: consider cease and desist and full and complete in legal use, or Claudius' disjoint and out of frame. It is particularly felicitous and memorable when it incorporates alliteration or rhyme: tried and true, for instance, ...


6

"Beat it" in the context of the song means "go away". It is something one person would tell another to do, not something you would say you were going to do yourself. You could say, "The cops (police) are coming, (you) beat it!" Or "The cops are coming, let's beat it!" but you usually would not say "The cops are coming, I'm going to beat it."


6

Standard English uses 'I/you/we/they don't' and 'she/he/it doesn't', but there are many well-researched, stabilised varieties of English which don't use 'doesn't' or any other 's' form with 'she/he/it'. One of these is commonly called African American Vernacular English (AAVE), which is used by many African Americans living in large cities. Marshall Mathers/...


6

"Stick your fork in it and see if it's done." To stick a fork into something can have a negative meaning, along the lines of 'I don't like it, it's terrible, it's not good', or, per definition 2 of the link, 'To be completely destroyed or defeated'. Or as in The Urban Dictionary (TUD) entry 3 'Indicating a losing or lost cause'. So, being music and song, ...


6

It means two things: She's from a small town. Think of barns, fields, goats, and a handful of people wearing over-alls who seem to be proud of their drawls. The most exciting thing that happens in a typical week might be when farmer John's tractor breaks down. (This is a terrible and inaccurate characterization, but it's the kind of thought that the phrase ...


5

The way I would interpret black-and-white (when used as a verb) would be: Don't put everything into [two] absolutes when you're talking with me. Two common idioms are: It's black-and-white. It's not black-and-white. When something is either morally right or morally wrong, it's often said to be black-and-white, meaning that there are no shades of ...


5

The whole song is a woman complaining that her boyfriend doesn't act macho and aggressive enough. She implores him to tell her what to do, and to start fights with other guys out of jealousy. She is telling him that he should get angry — it is a command, in imperative mood. Johnny get angry, Johnny get mad Give me the biggest lecture that I ever had ...


5

Lord, I want to be a Christian in my heart is Standard English Lord, I want to be a Christian in-a my heart The "in-a" my heart part sounds like a dialect. According to Wikipedia, this hymn was composed by African American slaves in the 1750's, so it is probably a remnant of their dialect.


5

Lyric sheets online say both, so until I can get home and check my original CD (assuming I can find it) I couldn't say for certain. Listening to now, the first line is sounds to me like: "Teachers leave them kids alone!" and the following: "Hey! Teacher! Leave those kids alone!" The thing is, it doesn't really matter in this context whether it is ...


5

I believe "she freezed" here is a nonstandard way to say "she froze", as in to become frigid (abnormally averse to sexual intercourse — used especially of women, per Merriam-Webster). "On him" is just an idiomatic way to say that something happened to someone, like "the battery died on me." In that case the battery simply stopped working, with no implication ...


4

Part of the meaning of "don't you black or white me" here is likely something like: "do not make me and my personality, style, behavior or my art the object of categorization by race." In other words "Be more concerned with who I am than with whether I'm black or white, or whether I'm 'trying to be white' or 'trying to be black', or whether any aspect of my ...


4

The phrase deepest hour usually refers to the time of our most dire need, despair, gloom, or despair, although it can have a more positive spin (such as the deepest hour of our relationship). The phrase is found several times in books, often specifically referring to the deepest hour of need, or the darkest hour of night. You're welcome to peruse the ...


4

A Superiority Attitude? (Note that the following is not in any way intended to judge any ill intent by the OP. It is only an observation that certain language forms can be received in an emotionally negative way by readers.) I might caution that your enthusiasm regarding "incorrect grammar" and "uneducated speaker" may appear to many readers to be similar ...


4

Well, you as the listener have the ability to decide for yourself how to interpret it. I'll say this, though—as a native speaker speaking from intuition, your interpretation doesn't seem very likely to me. It seems like the song is written with the following sentences in mind: Why does she sing her sad songs for me? I'm not the one to tenderly ...


4

This line is followed by a very similar one, which might help: Swing a little more, little more o'er the merry-o Swing a little more, a little more next to me "Swing a little more" is the singer telling the girl to keep dancing. You can ignore the repetition of 'little more' as that's just poetry. The end of each line is the singer telling her ...


4

I noticed two similar lines in the lyrics: I ended up with pockets full of dust I ended up with pockets full of 'caine (Source.) The song seems to be describing the hardships faced when traveling from town to town. If you're traveling from town to town, barely scrapping by, you're likely to end up in the rougher parts of town. There, you are ...


4

Rock-a-bye has no particular meaning, though it's obviously patterned on lullaby, with rock replacing lull. Light songs and verses often incorporate nonce-expressions (expressions made up for the immediate occasion) and nonsense words and intruded syllables. They're intended not to communicate a 'meaning' but to create a rhythm or a mood or to establish a ...


4

While measuring a length using a ruler or other device with markings, the markings that occur at each 1-foot interval can be talked about using the term "foot" rather than feet. A yardstick, for example, has a 1-foot mark, a 2-foot mark, and a 3-foot mark. A distance contains a number of feet but a point on a line happens at a foot mark, or just foot for ...


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