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It means A=B approximately (very approximately), and the error is "within 20%", in other words "less than or equal to 20%". The exact expression defining the error is not stated, but 20% is a lot. It could be, as you speculate, |A-B|/B less than or equal 20%, or it might be |A-B|/A less than or equal 20%. Either way, they are saying that A and B are ...


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The noun gamma for the (capital) letter gamma and the noun gamma for the (minuscule) letter gamma are nouns of the same class, so formally they should be either both capitalised or not in running text. Of course if you are talking about both of them in context it is somewhat helpful for the reader to refer to them as Gamma and gamma respectively, even if ...


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This expression is difficult to say unambiguously in English (or probably any natural language); mathematical notation is an artificial language designed to be exact within a much more limited domain than is covered by natural language. There is nothing in English like the rule of construing mathematical notation called PEMDAS in US schools. Of course, any ...


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In this sentence, I used the verb "increment" two times, and this sounds to me weird and not proper. You can get away with this when talking about things with precision, such as technical or legal topics, or mathematics. Increment isn't a common word in everyday conversation, so if you are trying to reach a non-technical audience, you want to step down ...


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Increment means "increase to the next step on a fixed scale". Often it means "increase by one". "Increase" would be a better verb to use, and the active "increases" the second time (instead of "is incremented") If you increase the value of x by one, the value of the function increases by three. I'm not sure about the mathematical clarity of the ...


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