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The phrase 'at stake' is idiomatic, which is what makes this hard to understand. The meaning of 'issues at stake' is similar to 'undecided questions' or 'unresolved conflicts'. To 'illuminate the issues at stake' means to explain the various perspectives involved in the questions or conflicts. The phrase 'at stake' relates to this meaning because one side ...


3

In “speed the process along,” “Speed” is a verb The word “speed“ is most commonly a noun, but here is a verb meaning to increase the speed. “Along” shows progress toward the finish Along, as in “along a journey“ is used to describe the progress of something from start to finish. along — Adverb: toward a direction or goal; forward: How far ...


3

“Stake” comes from card games and gambling, where the “stake” is the prize or the pot. What has been put in the pot (what is at stake) will be won or lost. Examples when the police arrest you, your freedom is at stake. “With Brexit looming, the future of Ireland is at stake” USA Today / Yahoo News


3

Both are correct and mean the same. Both mean I fell off my bike while riding a bike with my friends. with the redundant information removed. In terms of style, I would choose I fell off my bike while riding with my friends. As it doesn't require backtracking. "I fell while riding a bike with my friends." requires the listener to use the ...


2

We know from the description of the trees and the wheat that it is a windy day. The sentence following your bolded query, mentions the brothers who are "testing the weather" (a previous question). The tall shadows in the bolded sentence refers to those brothers. The currents they are pushing through means the wind – since they are "testing the weather". ...


2

When trying to understand this passage, the key word to understand is culprit. From Oxford: culprit (noun) a person who is responsible for a crime or other misdeed. • the cause of a problem or defect: viruses could turn out to be the culprit. So, a culprit can be a criminal, or a cause. Ms. Dello begins her quote with: If searching for a culprit......


2

It can mean two things: I play soccer regularly, but I am not actually engaged in playing right at this moment. I know how to play soccer, and have played regularly in the past, but at this stage in my life I'm not on a team or otherwise playing regularly.


1

To some extent it's unimportant whether we, the readers, agree there is enough of a contextual change to merit using "still". The important thing is that the writer feels the conjunction is warranted. It may be slightly confusing, but then again a news article represents the observations of some human being -- in this case the Times reporter -- who follows ...


1

I believe you are correct. The preceding sentence indicates that the President was back-and-forth between frustration and his outings (an odd pair to denote) -- considering that, and your remarks, I would agree that the usage of still is strange. I invite other answers to perhaps shed some lost meaning into this. On a slightly less objective approach, given ...


1

Yes, the phrase "those wreckers" refers to "luck and chance." Further, the phrase "those wreckers of all but the best laid plans" indicates that luck and chance have the potential to ruin plans that are not well-thought-out, while plans that are well-thought-out are not susceptible to such ruination.


1

Native speakers use them. In fact, the example is likely a paraphrase of Sleeping in my orchard, a serpent stung me. Shakespeare (Hamlet, Act 1, sc 5). Shakespeare was a native speaker. Most listeners would have no trouble knowing it was me who was sitting. This is usually more obviously true when we hear the sentence in its context. Sentences occur in ...


1

This use of the word "for" is unusual, but it is correct. It is rare for X to do Y Here are some simpler examples that show the usage of "for" in this way: ✔️ Yes: It is rare for Twitter to ban specific advertisers. -- Jim Finkle, David Ingram, Reuters News Service, 2018 ✔️ Yes: It is rare for a player to combine the skills of power and speed. ...


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Tight here would be some variation of meaning 1 in the dictionary you linked to. The arena the game takes place is not large and wide open but instead is smaller and confined, with players located close together.


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Answered in the comments: "ex coeli" is not English, it is Latin. It means "from heaven". Ex = from; coeli = sky (in this context, heaven) – RubioRic Jul 4 at 8:41 Checking a few dictionaries and translators, this appears to be only Latin. It hasn't been fully assimilated like "ad hoc", "alibi", "bona fide" and many others.


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