5

It's a mistake. News articles don't begin with "But". Someone evidently thought it looked better with the headline below the article. Originally it may have looked like this: UK virus infections back to September levels But the World Health Organization warned that Covid cases around the world are continuing to increase at a "worrying rate&...


4

"Otherwise" can be understood as "other than that" or, in context "Other than scowling at Ron". "A scowl" is, of course, a facial expression for anger. We learn in the second part that "Other than scowling, Hermione ignore the insult that Ron made about Kreacher" In particular she didn't say anything to Ron (...


4

An honest mistake is a true or a genuine mistake. There's no such thing as a "dishonest" mistake—something is either an accident or it isn't. Rather, the term "honest mistake" is meant to contrast with an accidentally-on-purpose mistake. For example: Two coworkers don't get along. One of them accidentally takes a drink that the other had ...


3

The two sentences convey different things. In the second sentence The police had managed to quieten the protesters. implies that the police got the protesters to calm down somehow, and lessen the intensity of the protests. Maybe they even got the protesters to literally lower their decibel volume. The sentence implies that the protesters' behavior was ...


3

⚠️ You’re asking a question native English speakers won’t get As you said, the word “interested” is defined as “showing curiosity or concern about something.” And “nothing” is, well, not a thing; which is against the very definition! That’s where your confusion arose. You see, instead, you should think of the word “nothing” as a word with a grammatical ...


2

Although in most instances "parsimony" means to be cheap or overly frugal with money, in this case it is meant to try and be very frugal with the length of the topic analysis. The author wants to try and stick to the main reasons of non-voting without going into every possible reason. An alternate phrasing of the last sentence might be: "...


2

Imagine you are in a high place, and in danger of falling. You might be slipping. You will grasp anything you can with your hands. If there is not anything to grasp, in your fear you might use your fingernails like claws to slow yourself. This is a 'figure of speech' called a metaphor. The clubs are scared of falling down the ranks of world football clubs. ...


2

The word subtle can have various meanings depending on context. In this case I would say the intent is that of “not ostentatious”, or “inconspicuous”. There is at times an expectation that a former partner (particularly when the breakup is recent) who gets together with someone else would not publicly advertise it, out of respect for the former partner. ...


1

She was advised to go out with other men, to show Callum the fun that he could have been having with her if he hadn't left her. --KB


1

It's the second one. "I've had enough" means literally "I have had as much (food, drink or of an experience) as I want", but it is quite commonly used in the sense of "I can't bear a situation any longer".


1

The text is slightly ambiguous. Hereditary (of a title, office, or right) conferred by or based on inheritance. So the text could be saying that the granting of the right passed from one generation to another, presumably via the ruler and his/her offspring. Or it might mean, and I think this is more likely, that the small tracts of land referred to passed ...


1

Both "begin" or "start" can be used. But for a business, "start" is idiomatic. The resources you have found can help you choose the best word (not the correct word, because often many different words are correct). The first quote is ambiguous. It could mean "He began to read a magazine" or "He created a new ...


1

No, a sucker for a cult means "a gullible person who is swayed by any cult that they might encounter". The literal meaning of Did they push you right under was "Were you totally immersed for the baptism". But she seems to take it figuratively as "You became so deeply involved in that church that you became a fundamentalist". (...


1

It's an oddly-constructed sentence, but the meaning is He was aware that his presence in the weekend party (the fact that he had been invited) was partly due to his well-known interest in psychical things.


1

If anyone should die [...] his property and effects [1] should be left for his heirs [2], and no one should interfere with them. If he should have no heirs, they should appoint inspectors and separate guardians to guard the property, The first pronoun in the passage, them, pretty clearly refers to Nouns 1 (his property and effects). The second pronoun they ...


1

The author of this passage is writing about the extent of nonvoting. To explain or predict now much that did or will happen, they construct a model: a set of assumptions from which to draw conclusions. In a good model those assumptions will be relevant, and there should not be too many of them. Parsimonious models are simple models with great explanatory ...


1

To "note" something is to recognize and then acknowledge or comment on it. To do something "briefly" is to do it for a short period of time. (Or, in reference to saying or writing something, to do so concisely or using only a few words.) If something is "briefly noted", that means that one is only saying a little bit about it ...


1

To conjugate a verb is to list the forms of a verb in a particular order normally by person. In English, want is a regular verb and so is 1st person singular: I want 2nd person singular: Thou wantest 3rd person singular: He/she/it wants. 1st person plural: We want 2nd person plural: You want 3rd person plural: They want French, however, has many more ...


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