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In the example sentence used in the definition referenced, lock in means prevent the opposite of something. For instance, when you lock somebody in a room, you don't prevent them from being in the room, you instead prevent them from leaving the room. As such, you can't simply replace lock in with prevent in the example sentence in the question—that would ...


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The problem with the paragraph is that the referent of it changes midway. In an attempt to demonstrate the problem, I will fully expand all instances of it and its in the examples I provide. If the referent remains the same throughout, then it would be interpreted in the following fashion: ✘ It = the possibility that none of the people around you may be ...


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The difference is that "worked the table" means that "being at the table" was the work, but "worked at the table" means that "you did some other kind of work while at the table". In this case "the table" is a special table set up with flags and books. And the job is to be at the table and represent HERO. Because the job is "being at the table" you can say "...


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It does mean equipment, especially bulky equipment, but you are right about the origins of the word. According to Etymonline it meant: "traveling equipment," c. 1600, from Latin impedimenta "luggage, military baggage," literally "hindrances," on the notion of "that by which one is impeded;" plural of impedimentum "hindrance"


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only serves as a conjunction in this sentence, linking together two clauses. If you look it up in the Cambridge Dictionary, there is only one meaning of only as a conjunction, defined thus: used to show what is the single or main reason why something mentioned in the first part of the sentence cannot be performed or is not completely true In your ...


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It is indeed used to mean "now I understand" in this case. There are a bunch of metaphors that treat the learning or understanding process as a sort of journey, where one person is leading and the other is following. For example, if Joey is telling Chandler something: Joey might say, "Are you following me?" which means, "are you understanding everything I ...


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Yes, it's about the same as "but". It's easier to see if it's removed from the rhetorical question and negation "how do you know that it doesn't". With a slight adjustment so that it's grammatical by itself, we have: It hurts the tree, only/but it can't express its pain because it can't move.


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According to Investopedia: A position is the amount of a security, commodity or currency which is owned by an individual, dealer, institution, or other fiscal entity. They come in two types: short positions, which are borrowed and then sold, and long positions, which are owned and then sold. Depending on market trends, movements and fluctuations, a ...


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"Lock in" is used to mean secure with a lock. He was locked in prison. Because I couldn't find my keys, I was locked in my house. I locked my jewellery in my safe. Lock in used metaphorically means making secure or certain. “The biggest lesson we learned from the global financial crisis was to not abandon stocks because that’s how we lock in*...


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You are correct, it means the first of those two interpretations. We can exclude the second interpretation by substituting "unknown" for "which you might not even know". That would leave Knowing how to wield regular expressions unleashes unknown processing powers were available. That is clearly not grammatical, because "were available" has to connect ...


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Its a metaphor, created by this author. It's common for journalists to make their writing more lively by inventing metaphors and using imagery Coconut milk is creamy and sweet, giving a (metaphorically) lazy taste. "to needle", on the other hand, means "to provoke" into action (that's already a metaphor, you don't literally use needles to needle), so the ...


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It's ambiguous. Safest reading is to be prepared for it to take a long time, so notification might come during June. The phrasing of the example is a little odd. I probably would have phrased as something like, "Notifications will be sent before the end of June." Use of "until" is often clearer when it is used with a negative. "I won't send out ...


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You can stick with the present perfect. It will be understood that you mean until just before the present moment, and it's the best choice. Note the correct spelling of "soccer", and "a long time". That phrase is a determiner "a", an adjective "long", and a noun "time". When you write "along", it's a preposition, an entirely different word.


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It is not "but" logic. Rather, it is "but" psychology. Reports talked about survivors. That is optimistic; we can hope that many more have survived. The minister talked about many deaths. That is pessimistic; we must fear that yet more have died. It is mathematically true that three survivors and thirty seven dead, out of ninety nine passengers, do not ...


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Macmillan Dictionary defines the word 'elusive' as "elusive person or animal is difficult or impossible to find or catch." e.g., "The rebel leader proved elusive." Therefore, your interpretation is correct : "They were asked to go to Jhalwar on April 5 to be tested but proved elusive." = They were asked to go to Jhalwar on April 5 so that they ...


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The source of the quote: TheHindu.com Jhalwar "On an impulse, Dr. Raees decided to test the family members who had handled the body before burial. They were asked to go to Jhalawar on April 5 to be tested but proved elusive. “We had to take the help of the local police and move them by ambulance on April 6 to Jhalawar for testing, which could only be done by ...


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I am a native speaker and it isn't clear to me, so I presume it is poorly written. My guess would be that earth is in contrast to heavenly and metaphysical realms so it means that the media is the real world embodiment of the metaphysical ideal of Freedom of Speech. The phrase “unanswered power” seems to lack a formal definition, but has been used before in ...


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He's bound to be suspicious. This sentence is ambiguous in that (1) others may suspect him, or (2) he may suspect others. Therefore, the sentence gives two opposite meanings, as you've mentioned. For the 1st meaning, you can say : He's bound to look suspicious. For the 2nd meaning, you can say : He's bound to be suspicious of something/someone.


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