19

This seems to be a "dummy subject", or a "anticipatory subject". The word "It" refers to the thing mentioned later in the sentence. In your example, "It" = "the thing that may sound archaic to you". (This thing that may sound archaic to you) may sound archaic to you. These kind of subjects are fairly ...


12

"Drop" in the sense of "stop nagging" is more often paired with "it." I tell my dog "drop it" when I want her to release something she has in her mouth. If someone is pestering you and you said "drop it," the antecedent to "it" would be "the topic." But I think the meaning of "drop&...


12

It means a room in house, often a bedroom but not always. It suggests a private room. This is about a Hotel, so there are lots of rooms that are rented out, but there are also the master's private rooms. The "master's chambers" means his private rooms in the hotel. It suggests a party, held in the private part of the hotel, which might include a ...


11

No, it does not. The meaning is literal (well, not truly literal—statues are inanimate—but literal given the anthropomorphizing of the statues). It means the statues are physically higher than the visitors, and they are looking ("peering") at the visitors, so by necessity they must be looking in a downward direction. The phrases "to look down ...


9

Here’s how you can tell that “It” here is not a dummy subject. See whether there is a referent you can substitute for it or there that makes sense. There is in this conversation, but it is left implicit by the speaker, and filled in by the other person to confirm that she understood: “So they want you to get hitched?” That they want me to get married may ...


8

It means 'Pooh and his friends'. You would not use 'the' before 'company'. You can say 'and company' after mentioning a person's name, to refer also to the people who are associated with that person. Definition of 'and company' (Collins Dictionary)


7

The word you are asking about is aye. Merriam-Webster provides this definition: Definition of aye (Entry 1 of 3) : YES aye, aye, sir Wiktionary adds this: aye aye, sir (idiomatic, nautical) The correct and seamanlike reply, onboard a Royal Navy (or US Navy) ship, on receipt of an order from someone of senior rank or authority. It means "I understand ...


5

‘Chamber’ in general is a historical term for a room. These days it’s a bit dated, and rarely seen outside of prose (such as song lyrics) or fixed phrases (the most common one being a judge’s chambers, which refers to their private office and associated legal library). In the plural sense used in this song, it refers to the collection of rooms in a building ...


4

You’ve found a verse that’s very open to interpretation. Literally, “the Master’s chambers” would be a suite of rooms where some “master” lives. It’s rare in America, but some hotels do have “masters,” and a Google Books search does find a few inns and hotels (as well as universities) that had “master’s chambers” in the nineteenth century. So the ...


4

In the given sentence It may sound archaic to someone from your part of the world, but my people, the Corto Malteseans, they're very old-fashioned. "It" is not a dummy subject" here. "It" refers to the statement that "my people, the Corto Malteseans, they're very old-fashioned." and also to the further suggestion that the ...


4

It can be interpreted as referring to the earlier phrase "some find me to be an unacceptable leader", or to the later explication of why they find him unacceptable. If the latter, this is an example of the anticipatory it. Grammarians disagree on whether the term "dummy" applies in such cases; that term implies that it's merely a ...


3

Well, it's a song lyric, so it doesn't really have to make sense. But let's tease out what little we can. There's one definition on that Cambridge page that refers to a judge's private office, if "chambers" is plural. In this sense, the term can more generally be used to mean a professional office where privacy is vital. So I'm confident the place ...


3

You actually need more of the script to answer this question: Good, listen. Since I took control, the majority love me. But some find me to be an unacceptable leader. [laughs] What kinds of dicks would find that? Don’t they know how awesome you are? Have you shown them the birdies? It may sound archaic to someone from your part of the world, but my people, ...


3

It's not a "single quotation", it's an apostrophe, which is often used to indicate omitted letters. 'Bout' is not standard English, but occurs in some dialects. There are some cases where two different forms of a word exist in standard English, such as round/around, and waken/awaken. In these, both are normal words, so there is not an omitted ...


2

To question something means to have doubts about something. to express doubts about the value or truth of something: I questioned the wisdom of taking so many pills. (Cambridge) The thing that they may have doubts about is "the need for the existence of the null value". If they "never question the need..." this means that they never ...


2

I don't think it means LITERALLY that "someone weighs 3 stone". It seems to me that it's more a figure of speech...If someone told you they had butterflies in their stomach, would you ask them why they are eating butterflies?


2

Drop X can mean "remove X from your task list." So if the consultants have a list of people they need to nag daily or some other interval, "drop X" can mean to stop nagging them in that context.


2

In this classic scene it's usually the family solicitor (lawyer) who reads out the will, and this sounds like legal language. I think you have the right of it. I found this definition in the Longman online dictionary: to show that a situation exists or something is true In other words, their not liking Grandfather's decision is not evidence that he was ...


2

They are talking about game theory and the idea of equilibriums, in other words optimal solutions to the game. Note that game in this context is a very broadly defined term, we aren't just talking about chess or checkers. A very well known example is the Prisoner Dilemma. When talking about solutions to games, most famously you may have heard of Nash ...


2

Like @nschneid said in a comment, it is a non-technical way of conveying how the actual number is stored. If you blur your eyes enough, "with a note" is a metaphor for a physical note1 that tells you how to interpret the information. The metaphor says this: Someone wanted to express the number 12.75 in a way that you can understand. They wrote the ...


1

Last week's meeting A meeting that happened in the week before the week you are in now The last week's meeting A meeting that happened in the week before a week in the past Suppose regular weekly meetings are scheduled for Wednesdays. Today is Monday October 18 2021, so last week's meeting happened on Wednesday October 13 2021 If we are talking about (for ...


1

Words have definitions, and they have implications. There is the literal meaning of the word, and all the associations that come with a word that aren't part of its literal meaning that you would find in a dictionary. These implications are often called "suggestions" or "subtext", and a "hard suggestion" would be an ...


1

"on me" is used for emphasis. In friendly banter, "on me" is just a tag to emphasize that the speaker has perhaps noticed something about the other person -- in the example "skinnier". In the case of "skinnier" it might be a compliment for someone losing weight. Usually indicating that speaker has not seen the person ...


1

Yes, you can use "thus" in the sentence "She was lucky enough to learn from all those movies, thus raising the quality of her own one." Yes, two of the main meanings of "thus" are either "in this way" or "with this result" (or maybe "because of this" would be a better substitute for the second use). ...


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