5

"Bubble" hasn't gained a new meaning as such, but in the context of the Covid-19 pandemic, the UK Government has started to refer to a small group of people (in some cases) as "a bubble". The basic principle is that if you have two people, who live in different houses, they can 'pretend' that they live in the same household, and therefore ...


5

Went jarringly with means the two things do not go well together, or are inappropriate next to each other. This might be a simple as two colours that clash, or someone delivering bad news in an excited tone of voice. In this instance being recently widowed does not fit with having a "a rosy, girlish glow" a description that might be more ...


2

English has many phrasal verbs, consisting of a verb plus a preposition or adverb. While there are some patterns to them (for example, many phrasal verbs containing up have a sense of completing something) generally they need to be learnt individually. A good dictionary will list them. So, the answer is, Yes, you do need to learn them. Note that give over in ...


2

I would say: They want 40 millions, but that's (the stage) where they are now. Yes, you can use the noun stage with this meaning: A point or step in a process or development (WordHippo) However, the expression they are where they are is the most common, not the expression with stage as you can see from Gngram.


2

It seems to be a deliberate conflation of several ideas for comedic purposes. Goats are known for having beards There is a fungus called goat's beard fungus. It has that name because it somewhat resembles the beard of a goat. This fungus, like many others, can grow to a large size quite quickly (often overnight). This process could be called "...


2

"That order" is Michael first and Oscar second. He is talking about being smart, so it means that Michael is smarter than Oscar. It is a subtle insult to Oscar. Probably the whole exchange is ironic.


2

OK so I think it needs a bit more context, so I watched a clip of the scene, and I think it takes place after Michael has beaten Oscar in some kind of "who's the smartest" competition? So what Jim's saying is that Michael is smarter than Oscar, because they're the two smartest "in that order", the order he said their names in. I think it'...


1

It's a bit of an unusual/clunky phrasing. It might be better understood if written as: Biletsky sidestepped the question, instead reminding the crowd of the importance of voting. i.e. instead of answering the question, he reminded the crowd of the importance of voting.


1

“Hold the door” by itself is used to mean “hold the door open” (see Why do you hold the door for others? for an example). From your context, it’s clear that’s not what you mean, so I would instead go with “hold the door closed” or “hold the door shut”, which is not ambiguous and conjures an image of someone leaning or pushing against a door so that no one ...


1

I am inclined to understand "while" in the sentence below: Households can reduce the cost of electricity and gas bills, and improve their health and comfort, while companies can increase their competitiveness and their productivity. as expressing simultaneity of concepts, though not of events. There is no contrast between the two ideas, as there ...


1

It is grammatically correct, but you are saying something in a way few native speakers will understand.


1

Haven't watched the video, but from the quote it would be the same as what Merriam Webster describes as 'flip the script': flip the script informal : to achieve an outcome or adopt an approach that is opposite to or completely different from what has happened or been done previously The tagline to the video on YouTube mentions: Humility, transparency and ...


1

This paragraph has to do with the now outdated custom of leaving calling cards at the homes of people you went (physically) to visit. If the person was not "at home", you generally left a card in a tray that was presented (by a butler or maid) specifically for that purpose. Please note; It was not uncommon to be declared "not at home" ...


1

he shot a deep 3, and you usually reach deep into the bag to get the last fries


1

It's generational ! In the early days of television TV shows were referred to as programs. In the 60s we bought the daily paper partly to have the " program guide". It was how you knew what was scheduled to be on one of your 3 channels .


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