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1 vote
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A very tight fit

The only situation where this would work is if the reason it is hard to get an invitation is that the room is too crowded (people literally squeezing in tightly). And a situation like that might ...
SegNerd's user avatar
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3 votes
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"Windows tilted open to the chill day"

I think this is simply a poetic variation of the stock phrase open to the weather. day does not have a calendar sense there, but refers to what the day has brought (chill); and "open to" ...
TimR's user avatar
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0 votes

Globus or globus sensation vs. feeling a big throat

His breath catches as he inhales, his throat suddenly too big, In other words, his throat feels too big for the amount of air he inhales.
Lambie's user avatar
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2 votes
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Globus or globus sensation vs. feeling a big throat

It's not a common idiom or phrase. I'm not 100 percent sure what the author was going for here, but my best guess is that they wanted to evoke the feeling of one's throat tightening - when you're ...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
1 vote
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"William's heart jumps at the sight of such small bodies . . ."

This Ngram shows that, apart from a spike in the 1860s, the frequency of [his/her/my] heart winced has suddenly increased. (That spike seems to result from two much-published works, one of which is a ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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2 votes

"William's heart jumps at the sight of such small bodies . . ."

In the phrase "William's heart jumps at the sight of such small bodies", "heart jumps" is used to describe the feeling of sudden shock. The "heart jumps" wording is ...
fatalerrer's user avatar
0 votes

Is the word "you" used as generic "you" here?

If I may paraphrase your question: When Ruth says "And then you die" does she mean people in general or Barbie in particular? The answer is "both", but mostly Barbie in ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
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2 votes
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What does "so I'm not" mean?

The key part of the sentence is "I'm not understanding", which means the same as "I do not understand". Bella is saying the because Duncan can also do the same as was done to Bella ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
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1 vote
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What does "running stuff" refer to?

“To run” something can mean to “manage” or “oversee”, like “running a company” (overseeing the company’s operations; being in charge); or even “running an errand” (doing a small task). Wiktionary, “...
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
2 votes
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What does "pastels and plastics of Los Angeles" mean?

Pastels are a color scheme: Barbieland, in the movie, is distinctively colorful. Pastels also have the connotation of being emotionally positive, in a way. “Leaving behind the pastels of Barbieland” ...
Julius Hamilton's user avatar
2 votes
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Is the word "you" used as generic "you" here?

It's somewhat ambiguous. Ruth is a ghost who, as a living human, made up Barbie and then died. So she is talking about herself. But she's also talking about humanity as a whole. The things that humans ...
Borgh's user avatar
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2 votes
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What does "keep it singing" mean?

Answer deleted by me because I didn't realize you can't actually delete accepted answers. Apologies to all.
Lambie's user avatar
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5 votes
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What does "little" mean here?

'Little' is a diminutive term, and is sometimes used informally in terms of endearment, like "my little honey bunch" or "he's a little hottie!". It doesn't literally mean "...
Astralbee's user avatar
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3 votes

Are both sentences below correct?

You can say: Where do you see yourself five years from now? or Where do you see yourself in five years? In five years from now seems to be used pretty commonly as well, but it's a little redundant ...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
3 votes
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". . . the thick belching chimneys sitting close to the countryside and the narrow lanes tell him he's in a different country"

sit there means "to be located, to be situated". The house sits well back from the road. The town sits at the foot of a steep hill covered by vineyards. P.S. close to the countryside is ...
TimR's user avatar
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0 votes

"The company receives millions of dollars in advertising revenue." — What specifically does "in" mean here?

From the Britannica dictionary, look at definition 3a for the word 'in': https://www.britannica.com/dictionary/in 3 a — used to indicate that someone or something belongs to or is included as part of ...
Xighteous's user avatar
1 vote
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Here's your hat. What's your hurry? Meaning

I don't think this is an "idiom". There is some irony in the second phrase. It only makes sense when you realise that both people in the conversation are not telling the whole truth. The ...
James K's user avatar
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3 votes
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What is the meaning of "smiling females" in the sentence "the unowned anger of all the smiling females of unenlightened times"?

A "smiling female" is literally a female who is smiling. Dictionary definition. The only thing the wider context tells you is that the smiles are false. The women apparently have "...
Astralbee's user avatar
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1 vote

". . . those who feel able to answer this call for help, have a strong cup of coffee and be on your way."

I suggest, gentlemen, those who feel able to answer this call for help, have a strong cup of coffee and be on your way This sentence uses the rather formal construction "...suggest [that] direct-...
JavaLatte's user avatar
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4 votes

". . . those who feel able to answer this call for help, have a strong cup of coffee and be on your way."

ORIGINAL I suggest, gentlemen, those who feel able to answer this call for help, have a strong cup of coffee and be on your way. The speaker seems to be making a centaur of a sentence, part direct-...
TimR's user avatar
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3 votes

". . . those who feel able to answer this call for help, have a strong cup of coffee and be on your way."

We can see the structure better in a simpler form: I suggest you have a cup of coffee. Functionally, yes, this is a request or order. We could use the same structure even more forcefully: I demand ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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9 votes

". . . those who feel able to answer this call for help, have a strong cup of coffee and be on your way."

It's an imperative... Gentlemen, have a coffee and be on your way. The phrase "those who feel able to answer this call for help" is an appositive to "gentlemen".
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
6 votes
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". . . those who feel able to answer this call for help, have a strong cup of coffee and be on your way."

You can take it either way. I first read have and be as imperative; and the vocative gentlemen, supports that reading. But they could also be so-called "subjunctive" (i.e. base form) after &...
Colin Fine's user avatar
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2 votes

I exactly want to know what 'now' means

An interesting question. I would say "now" focuses on the present time, but if a recent change is salient, it could be a conventional way to communicate a new state of affairs (that may last ...
nschneid's user avatar
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1 vote

What's the meaning of "tremendous significance" in this context

The tremendous significance lies in what we dared not tell—what I would not tell now but for the need of warning others off from nameless terrors. lies=is found in Explanation: The huge or very ...
Lambie's user avatar
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4 votes
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I exactly want to know what 'now' means

"Now" means "at the present time". It doesn't mean "from now on" (for that we would say "from now on") "I don't have time to watch TV now." means &...
James K's user avatar
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2 votes
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"They joked earlier about quite what that would mean."

It could be paraphrased as "exactly" or "precisely". It does seem to be "padding", in the sense that you could remove the word and there wouldn't be much difference in ...
James K's user avatar
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1 vote

Will "relationship" be read as "relationship with other people" when it's not being modified?

It depends on context. If you were talking about database design and used the word "relationship", I'd most likely assume you were talking about a relationship between two database tables. ...
Jay's user avatar
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0 votes

What is being implied in this exchange between Simon and Jack in Lord of the Flies?

The clue to context is here: "...in his effort to express mankind's essential illness..." Any word meaning "trash" or "garbage" would fit. Given the reaction from the ...
Michael_B's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

What is being implied in this exchange between Simon and Jack in Lord of the Flies?

"Shit" (probably) Apparently, Jack says something that can't be written down. But it is a single-syllable word, and means something "dirty" but is "crude" and "...
James K's user avatar
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3 votes
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Will "relationship" be read as "relationship with other people" when it's not being modified?

Yes, without modifiers, the word relationships (plural) is typically assumed to mean relationships with other people - especially close friends and family. If you want to talk about someone's ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
0 votes

"John steered Mary to the restaurant." — What does "steered" mean here? How did John take part in the process?

It means John made Mary go to the restaurant, his position relative to her doesn't matter What does matter, is the nuance of the figurative "steer". There are many words we can choose to ...
Raestloz's user avatar
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0 votes

"John steered Mary to the restaurant." — What does "steered" mean here? How did John take part in the process?

When used in the sense of "to guide by giving a recommendation and/or directions; to guide by way of education" the verb steer is being used figuratively. The literal meaning is "to ...
TimR's user avatar
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0 votes

"John steered Mary to the restaurant." — What does "steered" mean here? How did John take part in the process?

Without any additional context, I would infer the meaning in 1c for your sentence, but any of the three could be correct. Your provided definition is the right one for this situation. For me, the ...
aTotalStranger's user avatar
0 votes

"And don't you polish up well!"

I upvoted James K's answer and I won't repeat it. Let me just add one point: "Polish" has at least two distinct meanings. To "polish something off" is to complete it. This is ...
Jay's user avatar
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11 votes
Accepted

"And don't you polish up well!"

Imagine you have an old piece of furniture. It looks dark and shabby and not very beautiful. But if you clean it and polish it you see that it is very good. You might say that the piece of ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
2 votes

"Feature" (mining terminology)

In archaeology, feature is: Features Features in archaeology — also known as “cultural features” — are non-portable (cannot be moved) artifacts such as storage pits, garbage pits, graves, hearths, ...
Lambie's user avatar
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0 votes

"Feature" (mining terminology)

Merriam-Webster definition 3.a for feature as a noun says “a prominent part or characteristic”. The usage in your examples above (“…feature number 1291…” and “(feature 1166 - 1174)”) implies that ...
Jeff Zeitlin's user avatar
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1 vote

"The bright, trussed figures of the women, with sparkling necks, . . ."

There is a contrast, I think, between the "solid" clothing in which the men are dressed and the women's dresses that expose bare backs, bare shoulders, other areas of bare flesh, such that ...
TimR's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

"The bright, trussed figures of the women, with sparkling necks, . . ."

"Truss" means to tie, and historically it was used to describe the tieing up of clothing, particularly formal women's clothing that would have many tying parts. to adjust and fasten the ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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0 votes

What does the expression "then on" mean in this case?

"On __ goes" is an archaic phrase that means "__ goes on." The blank can be any personal pronoun such as: "On she goes." "On he goes." "On it goes." &...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
0 votes

What's the meaning of "finish dead last"?

Dead here means exactly or precisely. So, dead last = exactly last dead heat = exactly tied in a competition they're dead even in the standings = they're exactly tied in the standings. Collins ...
user182601's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

"Collision" vs "Crash" --- If a ship hits a bridge, is it a crash or a collision?

It normally is the user's choice; either crash or collision are appropriate. However, I've worked for a government agency which had their own "style book": airplanes crashed, automotive ...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
0 votes

What does "over" and "average" real mean here?

Let's define the two words 'average' and 'overall' separately, and then explain why both are used together. An 'average' in mathematics is a number (or percentage) that represents the typical value of ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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0 votes

What does "over" and "average" real mean here?

an average grade for Physics of at least 80 over the last three years of secondary high school. Add the grades together, divide by the number of grades. over introduces the phrase that specifies the ...
TimR's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

What does "over" and "average" real mean here?

In your sentence, "over" means "during". Over the last three years = during the last three years. Average overall grade: This clearly refers to the average of all your grades ...
Ali E's user avatar
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1 vote
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Meaning of the phrase in bold

Some important points: I imagine that there's no question that the house is not electrically lit. The novel was written in 1910, when it would not be a given even in Western settings. The ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
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12 votes
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Meaning of "helpings of drive"

It's a metaphor, derived from a meal where you choose how much to take from the dish. Someone goes to a salad bar, and the portion that this person takes is a helping. If he takes a lot, it will heap ...
Mary's user avatar
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2 votes
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What does "for it" mean?

"It" always refers to something previously mentioned or immediately apparent. "For", in this context, is used to introduce a reason. So, the speaker is saying the reason the men ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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