Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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This message appears in the manual for an Epson receipt or label printer. The "print status" is the status of the printer. Since it probably doesn't have a large display (if it has any display at all), and it is after all a printer, it makes sense that the printer can output status information by printing it out on paper. Printing the current print status ...


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Generally speaking "hometown" tends to refer to the place you were born and raised in rather than where you currently live; however that may depend on where you are geographically at the time you say it! If you were at university in London and you said "my hometown is Liverpool", it would be understood that you normally live in Liverpool but you are ...


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Generally, "hometown" would refer to the place where one was born and raised - "hometown" has a kind of "home is where the heart is" feel to it - although in this kind of conversation there'd often be some clarification, some kind of: Well, I live in London, but originally I'm from Cambridge. This would be the case especially if the expression was more ...


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The first sentence is not right. The second is the better choice if you swap the two parts of the sentence: With all of my bills paid in advance, I'm feeling great about this month. If you keep it the way you had it, use "because" instead: I'm feeling great about this month because all of my bills are paid in advance. "While" means "even though" and ...


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Only sentence one is grammatically correct. To correct sentence two, remove "are": I'm feeling great this month, with all my bills paid in advance. "With" is a preposition, so you don't need a verb after it. On the contrary, "while" is a conjunction, so it needs a dependent clause after it, which contains a verb. Another option I'd like to suggest is ...


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The commas are there so that the sentence is interpreted as The state of not having smth that is essential or not having enough of smth that is essential The commas are basically parenthetical. It makes no sense to remove only the first comma and removing both commas prevents the parallelism. However, even some native speakers misuse commas (because we ...


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Moving or removing commas certainly can change the meaning of a sentence. But in this case, I don't think it does. The commas here just add a "breathing pause". Adding or removing them doesn't change the meaning. This is not the same as commas that set something off as a non-restrictive clause, which DOES change the meaning. I remember when I was a kid ...


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The two commas make it clear that the first and last part can combine to make a full sentence. The state of not having smth that is essential. We know from the two commas that the above is part of the definition. On the other hand: The state of not having or not having enough of smth that is essential. This reads a bit too fast, and could also ...


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"We know each other" could be paraphrased "Each of us knows the other." "We respect each other" could similarly be paraphrased "Each of us respects the other." But "We have a real intimacy between each other" could not be expressed "Each of us has a real intimacy between the other." I guess that this is because "between" involves the concept of a plurality, ...


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We have real intimacy between us. This makes more sense than: We have real intimacy between each other. The latter not really making any sense, because "each other" implies a separation, when the intimacy is actually only in one place ("between us"). But to me neither sound idiomatic. What you could say: There is real intimacy between us. We ...


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Yes, but I'm not sure if you mean your question in quite the same way. It means that they would pray, expecting that it would improve their health to do so. As I read it, the implication is that they think that praying itself is good for your health, not that they are praying for some intervention. (I may be wrong - more context would help)


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LDOCE has this definition of game, an uncountable noun: wild animals, birds, and fish that are hunted for food, especially as a sport This kind of game is likely to be sought by hunters.


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What does the whole part in bold say? It's just saying what Harry is imagining. You could break it down like this: ... for a moment Harry imagined coming here with Dumbledore, of what a bond that (=coming here with Dumbledore) would have been, of how much it (=coming here with Dumbledore) would have meant to him. So, Harry "and ...


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There is overlap in the meanings and it depends, to some extent, on whether you are using AmE or BrE. In the UK a class or form tends to mean the same thing. A group of young people who study in the same classroom during one school year. In most schools there would be several such forms who, together make up a year. Most UK schools so not use grade in this ...


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Lemonade is being used as a non-count or mass noun, because the enquiry was about the nature or composition of the drink. What is the black stuff in that pile on the ground? It is coal. What is that white powder on your hands (e.g. to a baker)? It is flour. What are honey gushers? It [a honey gusher] is lemonade. Mass noun


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"You sure this time?” Langdon didn’t bite. Olivetti is questioning Langdon's credibility, it sounds like Langdon was wrong about something before... - he is asking if Langdon has made [another] mistake. Langdon didn’t bite. Is exactly as you think, it's a sideways reference to him not 'taking the bait', the bait being Olivetti's criticism - Olivetti ...


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I understand "Well shot of..." to mean: To get rid of somebody / something so that you no longer have the problems they cause. As a native UK english speaker I've never heard “... well shut of ...”, even thought it is given in the Collins dictionary. I think "shut" may be a more American english use. “Well shot of..” is far more commonly heard in the UK. ...


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I do not know the song but I think if you consider it literally: He is playing a game of dominoes with his girlfriend but is pre-occupied with their failing relationship - his mind is on other things [gone astray]. As a result, he is not concentrating on the game and, as a result, he loses. It could also be a metaphor for their relationship - perhaps he ...


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In this case "out of" means because of, he's saying his lifestyle is the result of a choice. The phrase "out of" has many meanings and you see it used in a lot of different contexts. The link provided lists the various ways "out of" can be used, and includes the because of meaning I mentioned.


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If something is eternal it is infinite - lasting or existing forever, having no end (and in some applications, no beginning either). "Never" means "at no time in the past or future; not ever". Your phrase "never is eternal" is not an idiom I know, so is probably not a well-known quotation. It may be poetry, but as a statement it does make logical sense, ...


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The second one is the right one: "Polite society is outraged by the picture". Semantically, it is impossible for an image to be outraged so your first option wouldn't work, but it's also an incorrect interpretation, syntactically.


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BobRodes is right on the money with his answer. Harry resumed packing. And something happened to him. He felt (or was having) "a hard knot in the pit of his stomach." From Collins, one meaning of "knot" is the following: If you feel a knot in your stomach, you get an uncomfortable tight feeling in your stomach, usually because you are afraid or excited. ...


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You are breaking down the sentence incorrectly. Think of it this way: "He resumed packing. While he was packing, he had a hard knot in the pit of his stomach." I think you are thinking of the packing as something that has to do with a hard knot in the pit of the stomach. It doesn't. The sentence that immediately precedes the ones you have provided is "They ...


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What this means is that Harry was getting defensive and slightly angry (at that particular moment). When we have built up emotions inside and someone attacks us (complains, blames, criticisms, etc.), we tend to get defensive. And it is quite natural to get angry when we are defensive. Ron was sort of complaining and blaming Harry ("We thought you knew what ...


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... I think it’s great because they’re all on the wrong lines. "They" here refers to the physicists. From Cambridge, one definition of "line" is (Approach to subject) a way of dealing with or thinking about something or someone It is "a way of thinking about a particular subject (often written as a line of reasoning)" We cannot agree with their ...


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It means that the scientists are following the wrong lines of thought. A line of thought is a common idiom referring to the logic that someone followed to conclude something. For example, if I told you that I enjoyed eating at McDonald's, your line of thought might look like this: McDonald's serves primarily hamburgers. -> NegativeFriction likes eating at ...


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Death is often used metaphorically to refer to something ending. It can be used for something that is not alive. One of the topics in Chapter 2 of the article is why mobile attribution providers are losing relevance in our multi-platform world So the relevance or usefulness of app attribution is coming to an end, or "dying".


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There is a difference. This is a demonstrative pronoun. So, using it you, you specify which cat is yours. For example: -There are many cats in this room. Which one is yours? -Oh, this is my cat. (pointing at the cat) But if you enter a room holding your cat, you might say to your guest, "Here is my cat." It sounds like you are introducing it to ...


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Proceed: meaning to continue as planned would be better than "How to do". How to do what? However, if writing instructions it is better to use a 'Task-oriented' Active voice, for example: To make a cup of coffee: Fill kettle Heat water to 87.6 C... Select cup or mug Select coffee of choice etc.... "How to proceed" is a bit redundant ...


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This looks like a non-standard use to me. The phrase "flung theirs hands up" (or close variations) is a cliché - or actually, it's a part of a number of different clichés. You may read about people flinging up their hands in supplication, in horror, in defeat, in shock, in celebration, etc. It tends to have a literal meaning, describing a gesture (or ...


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I think you are reading this correctly, but I'm not totally sure. "Until, that is, the wood rots" should be read as belonging to the previous sentence, describing how the oxygen/carbon dioxide levels would remain the same until the wood rots, within the imaginary scenario of the Amazon disappearing instantly. It is actually not a complete sentence... it is a ...


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Notoriety does not have positive or negative connotations. It's all about context... Notoriety - is the state of being notorious which is just generally known and talked of. Now, this definition does also say "especially : widely and [unfavourably] known". Which has come about because of common use. I.e. we talk about criminals being notorious for [...


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I wonder why "notoriety" has a positive meaning in marketing and branding area. And what does it mean here? Fame? could you please explain it to me? This is less of a language question than a marketing question; even in the quotes that you've pulled, it is being used with the negative connotation, so you're right about the definition. However, it's a bit ...


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Yes, you have the right idea. I interpret it to imply disagreement, incompatibility, incongruity, etc. I really can't say that this is common expression, at least in everyday language. But it's understandable. The idea of perpendicularity suggesting dissimilarity is not unprecedented: perpendicular 4 : relating to, uniting, or consisting of individuals ...


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The definitions you give are somewhat incomplete. From Merriam-Webster's definition of notoriety: : the quality or state of being notorious From its definition of notorious: : generally known and talked of // iron is a notorious conductor of heat — Lewis Mumford As you can see, this does not mean something negative. It is correct, however, to ...


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Let's pick the phrase apart in order to understand it, because it's complex. to be directed at = to be intended to have an effect, or to be going in the direction of having an effect to be directed at eventually = to be intended have an effect after some time to bear on = to have relevance to to be directed to eventually bear on = to be intended ...


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"Little" here is an adverb modifying "wanted." Literally, little though he wanted to just means though he scarcely wanted to However, it actually means he did it even though he did not want to


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The sentence is suggesting there are so many reasons why Jordon is the ‘goat’ but if that’s not enough you should read on and absorb the full article it is introducing. The bold text in parenthesis ending with a question mark I believe is your stumbling block. It is being a little sarcastic to the reader. It is actually saying (Jordon has so many accolades ...


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accolade is recognition for something, often an award or verbal or written praise for someone's actions. If you need another reason (besides all the cool accolades, you know?) to cement Michael Jordan as the GOAT, this is for you. If you need another reason besides all the cool instances of praise about Michael Jordan etc. In other words, Michael Jordan ...


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If they mean anything, they mean the same thing, but it is difficult, perhaps impossible, to conceive of a situation in which either would be meaningful. I think you are confusing them with a different idiomatic construction My question has nothing to do with homework. or My question does not have anything to do with homework. Both the immediately ...


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Your paraphrase is nearly there, but not quite. Lawyers write [in the way that [they see [that other lawyers write]]] So, as does indeed mean "in the way that"; but the thing being compared is not "the way that they observe other lawyers" but "the way that other lawyers write", according to their observation.


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This is an interesting case. When I first read it, I didn't see anything wrong with it, but then when I read it more carefully, I concurred with you that there is something wrong with it: "Among the most significant challenges" and "in Canada’s Employment Insurance Program" are both prepositional phrases, and either one could have modified "found": "Among ...


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You're absolutely correct. The sentence is poorly written. When we say, 'Among a group of things...' we expect to then hear about some subset of the things in the group. Your examples are good, given the context of the piece. I also see a way it could be corrected by inserting the word 'these' and a comma in the right place. A 2015 inspection by the Mowat ...


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For A to command B's obedience means that B obeys A's commands (in a general, ongoing sense). For example, a ruler commands the obedience of their subjects in that if they give a command, they can expect it will be obeyed; it describes the relationship, rather than the act. In this context, it's asking if physical reality obeys these hypothetical 'laws' ...


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"It" can stand for a definite, obvious referent. I see the ball. It’s over there. Go get it and throw it back to me. "It" is impersonal at times. It is raining. Other times "it" stands for a condition rather than either of the two preceding cases. I hate it when I slam the door on my thumb. This is what your sentences are referring to. You ...


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To have a connection to someone: It means you feel something for the person. It is intuitive, not based on reality, mostly fantasy because after all can one really tell if one is compatible with someone with just one date? It has no precise meaning. In fact, it's just small-talk BS or an indirect way of saying you are attracted to the person. [caveat: my ...


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Is it an erroneous phrase? It's not common, that's for sure. I would say it's erroneous in that it's missing the word "get", or "become": "they felt themselves get quieter". But even then, that would leave a native speaker thinking about your choice of words rather than what you're saying. when can one say "I feel myself" or "They feel themselves"? The "...


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Bear on X means "to be relevant to". The X in both instances of the phrase in your provided paragraph is "questions like the one Jim was alluding to a minute ago".


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"Animated" literally means "full of life or excitement; lively", but is also used to describe a process of making cartoons and the like, whereby inanimate things - for example, drawings, clay models etc - are given the appearance of moving, or being alive. "Madness" can mean crazy behaviour, or perhaps wild, chaotic activity. "Animated madness" therefore ...


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I assume there was a pronoun or noun given right before the context you've given here. For example, James was never one for being jinxed. The author is telling you that James does not want to be jinxed. You can exchange "being jinxed" with "ice cream" to clarify the sentence. James was never one for ice cream. So, yeah, James is not pro-jinx-ation.


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