New answers tagged

0

"Otherwise" can be understood as "other than that" or, in context "Other than scowling at Ron". "A scowl" is, of course, a facial expression for anger. We learn in the second part that "Other than scowling, Hermione ignore the insult that Ron made about Kreacher" In particular she didn't say anything to Ron (...


0

In jargon it means get a room, you two.


-1

unless otherwise explicitly stated, it's the moon moon version of yet yet, which is yet. That's the simpler meaning. Since there's the but word, it's scowlingly, however, not even bothering to check in that direction. Due to what do you need to decipher spatial codes from HP?


0

Thank you All, My name is Chad. The article makes sense to me because being on spot at the designated time of interaction makes a difference in one's life. The most important aspect of doing so may include some level from one to five... of giving. This could mean giving of time, or money, but the most important part of this to me personally is to give an ...


2

An honest mistake is a true or a genuine mistake. There's no such thing as a "dishonest" mistake—something is either an accident or it isn't. Rather, the term "honest mistake" is meant to contrast with an accidentally-on-purpose mistake. For example: Two coworkers don't get along. One of them accidentally takes a drink that the other had ...


4

It's a mistake. News articles don't begin with "But". Someone evidently thought it looked better with the headline below the article. Originally it may have looked like this: UK virus infections back to September levels But the World Health Organization warned that Covid cases around the world are continuing to increase at a "worrying rate&...


0

The author of this passage is writing about the extent of nonvoting. To explain or predict now much that did or will happen, they construct a model: a set of assumptions from which to draw conclusions. In a good model those assumptions will be relevant, and there should not be too many of them. Parsimonious models are simple models with great explanatory ...


1

Although in most instances "parsimony" means to be cheap or overly frugal with money, in this case it is meant to try and be very frugal with the length of the topic analysis. The author wants to try and stick to the main reasons of non-voting without going into every possible reason. An alternate phrasing of the last sentence might be: "...


0

Why did Thor respond to Hymer's words about fish? The most common reason to speak is the wish to say something in particular, but that's not why he spoke. He was distressed by the fact that the hall was not cheerful and just wanted get a conversation going about anything at all. That was the real reason - more than any other. I don't understand what your ...


0

Assess seriousness of each case, select external service providers (e.g. surveyors) to participate in investigation and achieve expected outcomes in a cost-effective way. My suggestion is shown below. As the passage has no independent clause, I have used small letter for the first word and deleted the full stop at the end. [a]ssess seriousness of each ...


0

Thanks for @Kate Bunting and @FeliniusRex, who provide following comments which should answer this question. In the first, the person has written the letter. In the second, the person has written some articles for the magazine - writer of would imply that they write the whole magazine on their own! – Kate Bunting You are a writer for something when you ...


1

To "note" something is to recognize and then acknowledge or comment on it. To do something "briefly" is to do it for a short period of time. (Or, in reference to saying or writing something, to do so concisely or using only a few words.) If something is "briefly noted", that means that one is only saying a little bit about it ...


0

"Briefly Noted" is usually a category of "shorter than usual" articles in a magazine or other long-form publication. If the typical article is 1200 words, a "briefly noted" article might be 600 words or less. For example, in the Pennsylvania Gazette Briefly Noted section, there are only two or three sentences about each topic. A ...


-1

It does to a mathematician. The study of zero (nothing).


3

⚠️ You’re asking a question native English speakers won’t get As you said, the word “interested” is defined as “showing curiosity or concern about something.” And “nothing” is, well, not a thing; which is against the very definition! That’s where your confusion arose. You see, instead, you should think of the word “nothing” as a word with a grammatical ...


19

It is both grammatical and sensible, but out of context, it is not unambiguous. It could mean either of the following: I am interested in the concept of nothingness. I am not interested in anything. Note that in the first case, “nothing” here actually is a “something” in the context of “showing curiosity or concern about something,” since it’s being used ...


0

Some websites of the meanings of names state that Myrna means "beloved". If this is true (because other websites state different meanings), and if Hammer and McKeen know about it ("only Alisson Hammer or Meg McKeen can answer this" - TypeIA), then it's possible that Hammer is making an inside joke of it. My real name also means "...


6

The phrase is "The best X a person could ask for" which means "the best possible example of an X." It means the person being thanked is the most perfect possible version that the author could hope to know or be friends with. Usually this is something like "the best editor a person could ask for" or "the best wife" or &...


2

I'm guessing this sentence appears on the book's dedication page rather than in the main text. Such dedications sometimes contain "inside jokes" or references that only the author and the person mentioned in the dedication are meant to understand. So it could well be that only Alisson Hammer or Meg McKeen can answer this. Rest assured, it's nothing ...


9

It is grammatically correct. That is, it is a complete sentence that communicates an idea. You probably want to re-write it to make your meaning more clear. A fundamental physics type might be "interested in nothing" in the sense of being interested in the nature of vacuum and cosmology and similar topics. For example, Lawrence Kraus has written ...


3

Yes, it makes sense. It means the same thing as "I am not interested in anything."


0

"In economic booms, it always picks up, but it never picks up as far as the previous peak,” Deaton said. “You get this endless downward ratchet. That’s something we really need to turn around, and it’s going to be hard.” We get the meaning from context that it refers to the economy, not 'recovery from recessions', though. Strictly said, there is a ...


1

It's #9. She's in the funeral parlor business (trade = business). Apparently, she wants to sell the other character a coffin.


2

Yes, but there's more to it than that. A ratchet is a physical tool that prevents motion in one direction (usually down); a downward ratchet prevents motion upwards, and as the quote says, doing this (taxing the so-called rich for the latest government scheme) creates a series of upper limits, like an upside-down mountain range -- the employment rate may ...


2

There seem to be "thongs" (physical bonds) tying him to a chestnut tree, but something beyond that (a dominion superior to any physical bond) kept him there. The thongs were not necessary. In this sentence, "dominion" has this sense: American Heritage Dictionary "dominion" A territory or sphere of influence or control; a realm. ...


2

Does "Athena could eat properly" mean "If Athena ate she could eat properly"? No. It's a sentence about one's abilities in the past. It's not hypothetical. Athena can eat properly. (=present) Athena could eat properly. (=past) It could mean she was old enough to know how to behave at the dinner table, how to hold a spoon, how to eat ...


1

Meaning 1. Causing constipation. The Henna tree contains a "cold earthy essence". This will cause your poo to go hard and prevent diarrhoea (according to the book). But it also "decomposes". It helps food to break down in your stomach. You will find a lot of traditional herbal medicine is about digestion and poo.


1

In British usage up to the middle of the 20th century, this unambiguously meant "came to visit". In American usage and more recent British usage, it generally means "telephoned".


5

If you look up so in a dictionary you will see that some meanings are "to the extent" or "to such an extent/degree." In fact so much has its own entry at wiktionary. "Only so much so fast" is a limiting expression; the implication is that the body can heal some amount and no more in a set amount of time and no less. The ...


2

If the leash is slack (neither the owner nor the dog is pulling it taut), it feels the same whether a foot (30 cm) or 3 inches (about 7.5 cm) is trailing on the ground. Similarly, if an employer can easily recruit new staff, the actual number of unemployed people looking for work makes no difference to them.


2

In a literal sense, "slack" (as a noun) on something like an animal's leash means that the cord is not pulled taut, is hanging down slightly, the result of which is that there is some freedom of movement for the animal. The more 'slack' on a leash, the more freedom there would be to move. Allowing only a little slack would mean that, if the animal ...


1

There have been exceptions — the Nepali Maoists, for example, managed to partake in power after peacefully ending the civil war — but if the Indian Maoists’ denunciation of these steps taken by their Nepali counterparts are any indication, such a step does not seem to be in the offing. The clause [T]he Nepali Maoists, for example, managed to partake in ...


0

I think it would be more natural to use tension rather than tense mood but either is fine. It is hard to think of circumstances where tension is a positive. You can, of course, experience tension when waiting for something pleasant to happen but that would usually be because you are unsure whether it will in fact happen. You might feel tense before giving a ...


2

Some doors on refrigerators ('fridges') and freezers are opened by a handle with a flap. To open the door, the fingers are used to pull the flap towards you; this unlatches the door and you can now pull the flap more to make the door swing open.


2

This is somewhat dated regional dialect, so you should not expect a straightforward description in modern English. He was a constant/regular/frequent flirt/skirt chaser/womanizer. That's the "powerful" and "running after women-folk". I think "bad un(one)" adds to the power as well as suggesting that the behavior is antisocial. ...


1

I'd call it sarcasm more than irony. Trump likes to go around naming things "Trump Tower" so it is really NOT a surprise that he is doing it again.


3

This is irony. To understand this you need to appreciate the full context. As irony, it is a parenthetical comment (marked by dashes) that means ".... (and this is not a surprise)..." In a non-ironic way. People will say "Surprise!" as an interjection when saying something surprising. Here is your coffee and — surprise!— I made waffles!...


2

Tops means roofs, or the upper edge of the buildings that the narrator can see. It is tops because there is more than one building that the author can see, and the sun is moving from one to another. It is building and not buildings because this is a construction called a noun adjunct, using one noun (building) to modify another (tops). When we use a noun ...


0

I am not expert in English language but I use both the words, Indisciplined and Undisciplined to express different character of persons. Indisciplined is by Default. It's Core Character of some persons. They can not be disciplined. Undisciplined is by Design. Parants make their children Undisciplined by pampering. They can be disciplined.


1

Fell off the curve has 3 aspects to it. First, the expected results fall within what is generally considered a range and not just a fuzzy value (for example Kindergarten age really means from 4 to 6, but it is understood to basically mean around 5). Secondly, the actual result in this instance is below the low end of the range. Finally, fell off, would ...


2

to ripple out[ward] means to move in small waves (called ripples) from some point or line or origin away from the point or line of origin. Rippling waves: Tons of rippling waves From Shutterstock.com [above] Below: theconversation.com


0

... great prospective spouses that are X means that the the speaker/writer is limiting the spouses he/she is talking about to only those that are X. Of what you posted, this is the most correct way to understand it. All the prospective spouses are not good enough. Thus, so many look right past all of them. However, you are ignoring the quote marks around &...


1

What does this "Ky, look at this photo! It's of a dinner my parents Ky went to" tell us?. It tells me we say: A photo of something. A photo of you. A photo of me. A photo of a dinner. A photo of a reception That is how we say what is in a picture in English. We use photo or picture of X.


1

The modal verb could is the politer relation of can, especially in requests, e.g. "Could you open the window, please?” “Could you lend me a hand?” In “I couldn't agree more”, couldn't is used as an intensifier, it means "absolutely" or "totally" as in I totally agree with you. I agree so much so, it would be impossible to express ...


3

The tense of a clause is the tense of its finite verb. In this case, the finite verb is the modal "could". ("Agree" here is a bare infinitive and so has no tense.) Morphologically (and for some purposes grammatically), "could" is the past tense of "can". However, some people prefer to think of "can" and &...


3

In this context coming through means being understood. The root of this expression would be from radio or telephone conversations where the sender could not be heard. You're not coming through clearly if your voice is distorted or otherwise un-understandable. In a face to face conversation it would mean the listener does not understand the point you're ...


4

I can't find any other example of this word, and some references to snadge don't seem to be relevant. The story is set in Liverpool, England, so it may be a local word. The author is showing that he knows it's an unusual word by enclosing it in quotation marks. The nearest possible standard English word I can suggest is snaggy - full of snags. Snags ...


1

You are correct. The author is contrasting two different viewpoints: A. Hunter and Westerman say that IT must demonstrate value through OTPD, OBPD, and FTRAD (i.e. developing a perfect product and delivering it on-time, on-budget, and with no changes needed) B. The Agile community says that maximum business value is delivered by creating minimally-viable ...


2

Just a brief note to what Jeff Morrow and Tᴚoɯɐuo wrote above -- It's possible that "May do" in the final line of the sonnet is intended to remind readers/listeners of the wedding vow "I do." If so, then this would support Jeff's claim that "do" means "love seriously." The larger sonnet sequence (Sonnets from the ...


3

This phrase is based in Cultural Somatics - see My Grandmother's Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies by Resmaa Menakem. Williams is saying that he remained aware of his body sensations in a mindful way so that he could steward his nervous system's response to this situation and not get carried away into a fight-or-flight ...


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