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The definition used for "anchor" (as a verb): to secure firmly


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In the context of admission to a university or other higher-education institutions, "admissions modality" or "admission modalities" (both forms are used) refers to the conditions that applicants need to fulfil before they can enter that university or institution. For example, some universities look at school results, some will require ...


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In this context, it’s likely that Elvira was paying for the hospital room in which the incident happened. She chose to pay for the best quality room the hospital had (which is why “Only the best was good enough for you”), but wasn’t aware that the services she was paying for included closed-circuit TV recording.


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That sense of "quality" means "how good things are". If they are defective, they are of low quality. If they are flawless, they are of high quality. If quality is spotty or uneven, some examples will be good, and some will not be as good. American Heritage Dictionary "quality" 3b. b. Degree or grade of excellence: yard goods of ...


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“quality” here means degree of good/bad. A common example would be wireless signal as you move around a city. In some places (or spots) it’s good, and in others it is bad. We could call this uneven coverage “spotty”.


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A recent survey conducted by the German Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Japan of its members showed that 78 percent of them regard the entry ban as a significant burden to their businesses. "of its members" means the members of the committee/company named "German Chamber of Commerce and Industry in Japan". In simple words, the ...


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Its a dark goodbye. I know its about to go horribly wrong and I'm out off here (but thanks everyone for being nice). I'm about to be let go because of Covid. I could use the phrase when it happens but have too much regard for my co-workers who remain. If that regard was absent it would be the perfect sign off as, metaphorically speaking, a hyper-space bypass ...


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"Particularly" means "especially". When we say "Asian culture, particularly Chinese culture", "Asian culture, especially Chinese culture", or "Asian culture, in particular Chinese culture", our statement applies to Asian culture generally but it applies even more strongly to Chinese culture. Lexico has three ...


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“particularly the Chinese” means to a greater degree for that subgroup, but it also applies to other “Asian culture” to a lesser degree.


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“all” here refers to all of Brighton Beach, including the sandy coast. Edit: it doesn’t include Coney Island, just that one can see the island from that coast.


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Here, "turns on" means "is decided by": turn on (turn on something) to be the issue, fact, or point that something depends on most The trial turned on the medical evidence presented by the defence. Turn on (Macmillan Dictionary)


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There is no particular idiom here, not in the version in the novel (a dumb rush of luck) nor on the tv (a rush of dumb luck) Either way, the man is saying that the reason he is winning is just random (ie dumb) luck. And so the girl should roll the dice, since she is likely to win. The present perfect is used as he is describing his current state. "Until ...


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Holding a scarf and singing shows that this is meant to be a football (soccer) chant. Probably the suggestion is that by cancelling factors, the hard problem 270/18 has been reduced to an easy one. Here is the point. Many students, when faced with 270 ÷ 18 will use long division. Long division is slow and it is easy to make mistakes, but children will ...


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Dumb luck = the way in which something good happens completely by chance, without being planned or deserved. macmillandictionary A little differently, a dumb rush of luck presumably refers to a throw or sequence of throws of the dice in which dumb means by chance, but bad rather than good. So Bors is giving the impression that he has had a run of bad luck ...


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I believe I am right in saying that you wipe a fixed object with something held in the hand (wipe the table with a cloth), but you wipe your hands or an implement on a surface (he wiped his hands on his trousers). You could use either when referring to a towel, but I suppose using on is seeing the towel as something fixed (perhaps it was hanging up).


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"With" could be correct. It implies the use of a towel. But "on" suggests that the dirt is now on the towel. It implies that the person is complaining that their towel is dirty.


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No, I believe that this refers to the fact that the social ills of the world have not been remedied (the thing that they are disappointed about) I agree that it is not clearly expressed.


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A literal spectrum is a rainbow of colours. Although each colour blends smoothly into the next colour (so nobody can say how many there are) The two ends of the spectrum: red and blue, are very different from each other. Figuratively a spectrum is when there is a range of different types, with no clear jumps between types, but a clear difference between the ...


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Namely is followed by something more specific or more precise than what came before. Presumably a Siberian husky isn't the only type of wolf-like dog, but even if it were, the species name would still be a more precise way of expressing what you were referring to. So: John bought a wolf-like dog, namely a Siberian husky is correct, but John bought a ...


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A spectrum is a wide range, and the "ends of the spectrum" are the points at each end of the range, or the extremes. "At the other end of the spectrum" means "at the other extreme" or "in sharp contrast". "From one end of the spectrum to the other" means "from one extreme to the other extreme". For ...


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Your Majesty is used when addressing the King directly. So in this sentence: I will redouble my efforts, Your Majesty. "Your Majesty" is correct. ("Your Grace" or "Sire" might work, depending on the exact protocol or etiquette observed in the particular era and in the particular realm.) It couldn't be "His Majesty"...


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It isn't good grammar, but modern song lyrics often dispense with the rules of grammar to support a rhythm or rhyme scheme. Given that the first person of the song is the one who is leaving ("I won't be waiting") I would suggest that the line in question should be "you're not worth staying for". In other words, the subject of the song is ...


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It's an inversion of the usual word order, and means the same as The successive trains carry these (the Americans) into the heart of the land everywhere. So all the components of the sentence are present; the verb is carry, and these is its object. But placing these at the beginning of the sentence places more emphasis on these instead of on the trains. ...


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This is a bit difficult to parse, particularly without some context (I have never read Seven English Cities, so I can't really say why the Americans are connected to their luggage by their heart-strings, for example); however, I think this is what it's trying to say: These (the Americans who prepared their spirits for adjustment to the novel conditions) the ...


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A “recipe for success” is an idiom that implies that if you follow the same pattern (behavior) with the same ingredients (people), then you will get the same result (success), just like a recipe for cooking. But it is almost always hyperbole; there are no such guarantees in life. The “Pacific Rim” refers to cities on the Pacific Ocean, or in this case, the ...


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It means that if you take a sample of it from anywhere within an amount of it, and test the sample for any property, quality or attribute, you will get the same result as you will from any other sample. It's all the same. That's what "uniform" means. If it's not uniform, it can't be called a single "substance".


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It's hard to analyse grammatically, because it's a blend of two different constructions. One is complex temporal conjunctions such as as soon as, as quickly as, and as long as (the last of which often loses its temporal meaning and becomes conditional). The other is the somewhat literary construction Good as the English voice cast is, which means "even ...


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There are a few [activity] night phrases that are commonly used to mean "a evening spent having fun doing [activity], usually with friends or family." The important implications are that the activity is fun and social. Game night is an evening playing games, typically indoor games like board games, card games or charades. Usually it's assumed that ...


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I can't be sure, but from the description it sounds like they're talking about a game mechanic that allows you to "fill in" spaces, holes etc. (like the example about creating something to fill the empty space left by a missing statue). The sentence is written in a typical way to describe opposite or contrasting things, like "give and take&...


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The sentence is talking about changes to marketing practices. Marketing mix is a reference to the the four P's of marketing- Price, Product, Promotion and Place. Spend probably means the budget allocated to marketing activities.


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You have the gist of it, it is meant to meant that everything is just great, peachy-keen, hunky-dory, etc. Side note: it's kind of an odd pairing. Moon-pies are typically considered a Southern comfort/junk food. So if the author was trying to give this a Southern feel, boiled peanuts would have made a better choice than salted peanuts as boiled peanuts are ...


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It means "everything is perfect", perhaps in way that is "too good to be true". I've not heard it before, but there are a number of other similar idioms: "everything is rainbows and butterflies" "everything is rainbows and unicorns" It is quite common for English speakers to make up their own version of this idiom, ...


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First, be aware that consumerization is jargon from the field of marketing, so you should not expect it to be understood in general conversation. You can easily find a definition of consumerization online: Consumerization is the reorientation of product and service designs to focus on (and market to) the end user as an individual consumer, in contrast with ...


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I had a different understanding of your question to Brad — where I think the idea that you are getting at is more around how civil engineers conduct themselves professionally, rather than an understanding of the discipline of civil engineering itself. From discussions I've had previously, people sometimes raise the idea that software development is not "...


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It refers to the types of customers. The same groups that were referred to by "they" twice in the previous sentence.


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To X identifies a destination or target. So go up to X means when you have completed going up, you are wanting your location to be X. She wants to go up the mountain. No destination is specified. So we don't know when she wants to stop going up. It could be at the top or a point before. Context/previous conversation/common knowledge might fill in that ...


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She wants to go up to the mountain. This means she wants to go to the mountain. We sometimes go “up to” somebody, which means to approach them or to get “up close”. This does not imply actually climbing that person (or mountain). She wants to go up the mountain. This means she wants to go up the mountain itself, such as by climbing it.


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The first sentence sounds like the addresser is describing that the girl is somewhere far away and she longed to go to the mountains. However the second sentence describes the idea of the girl standing at the foot of the hill or the mountain and actually looking forward to getting on top, typically referred to as hiking.


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Slightly different meanings. Going up the mountain would be used if you were on the mountain and in the process of ascending it. Going up to the mountain would be used if you were not on the mountain, but approaching it.


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Features here denote something that is perceivable or tangible. For example: the trees, bushes, fences, mountains, etc. They may refer to the characteristics of the place it is referring to. Like in this case, the beauty of the surroundings or anything sort of that.


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With "constellation" I meant to refer to the relation investment company - one "big boss" at its top - boss likely to die in the next years -> fate of company unknown. I didn't think about stars at all when I used this wording; as others already said, with constellation (Konstellation) I had in mind "how things are arranged".


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The speaker in that video is not speaking English very well. I believe the meaning he intended was "You need to be a good developer yourself to have it [your app] communicate properly and [you need] not [to] have any mistakes in there [,] because a mistake can be very pricey [,] with chargebacks. That is an issue clients may have." You should not ...


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When written, the sentence is not well-formed. When heard in your linked video, it is slightly clearer (but maybe because I have worked in software development, which is the subject of the video). However, it is still a very awkward construction, and you shouldn't use it as an example of good English. In the video, the speaker is describing how to implement ...


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According to https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/run%20roughshod it means to completely ignore the opinions, rights, or feelings of others My guess is that the bathroom trolls love gems, and will hurt or dishonour others to get them.


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From Dictionary.com: means / (miːnz) / noun 1 (functioning as singular or plural) the medium, method, or instrument used to obtain a result or achieve an end a means of communication As indicated in the definition and its example above, “means” can be singular even though it ends in “s”. You have to look at context to figure out which it is. In your ...


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There is no rule that says "only" must occur before a singular noun. For example, the following sentence is perfectly fine: Only criminals break the law. In the sentence in your question, "means" is used to mean "a resource or method with or by which a goal may be achieved". So if "exchanges" "were our only ...


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As the other answers note, it's a reference to an album name from the movie This is Spinal Tap. I add a separate answer only to note: in English, it is not uncommon for an article, publication, etc. in some medium on some topic to refer to some essentially unrelated cultural work. It's not necessary for a reference to entirely "fit" the context. (...


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This means that when they have an issue that they consider the product they are actually making, not the original idea. This can, in turn, mean one of two things: We don't let ourselves get bogged down by considering history. The original idea is moot. What needs to be consider is the product and how it's used. We foolishly treat the decisions we made ...


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It seems to be a metaphor. Literally if you might say "Release the animal to the wild". The animal is free to go into the wild countryside. So here, you allow your "desired outcome" to be free to go into the "wisdom of Reiki". It is fairly common in spiritual or "new age" writing to use this kind of metaphor. It ...


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The source is behind a subscription wall. Occurring in the same sentence as "permanent cuts in capacity", "scrapping" may mean the destruction of a ship that is no longer used. A search for the phrase "What is scrapping in the shipping industry" brings up an article in Wikipedia called "ship breaking", which is about ...


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