New answers tagged

1

I think that syntactically, a few hours earlier (or, for example, yesterday) is an adverbial element here, modifying the "deleted" predictably-repeated second instance of the primary verb: ...than the drop-dead gorgeous yoga instructor was [from] a few hours earlier. It makes no difference to the meaning whether the verb is repeated or not, or ...


1

"For" in this example is a hanging prepostition. It completes the phrasal verb started at the beginning of the sentence. The question is "How long for"?(time not distance) with the object placed after long.


0

No, ultimately nothing about the meaning of this sentence would change if the word "from" was excluded. I'd say overall the sentence is more readable without it.


1

In case usually refers to being prepared for a possible problem or emergency - "I'll take my umbrella in case it rains". Your quotation appears to be a prediction - what will happen if someone who is weeping continues to do so - so if is the appropriate choice.


0

This is how you would use in case: In case of fire, do not use elevator Here, you can’t use if: If fire, do not use elevator Because you aren’t saying in a case of fire, rather just fire, which doesn’t specify what you actually mean by fire. Also, ‘In case’ can imply that it’s a ‘case’ of something, meaning it may happen multiple times. In this example, ...


3

It is one of various informal ways of saying erase. Another, more common in Britain, might be scrub the last question.


2

There is a phrasal verb "take over" meaning "to get control of something". Its often used of businesses or countries, but it can be used here to mean that the "kink-fest" (a festival of sexual kinks) gets control of these blocks, in the sense that all the streets are filled with people at the festival. There's no notion of lease,...


1

"to branch" comes from observing trees. The trunk grows in different paths. Then each branch grows in different paths. Then each of those branches grow in different paths, etc. The term "branch" is widely applied to indicate divisions. For example, languages are said to have 3 main branches: Indo-European, Sino-Tibetan and Afro-...


0

Yes, “not until” is used to emphasize that an event does not occur prior to a certain point in time.


4

To 'see someone home' is to go with that person all the way to their home, with the intention of protecting them from harm, getting lost, etc. The hot drink (Bovril is a British drink made of beef extract and hot water, and Scotch whisky is also a 'warming' thing) is intended to keep the person feeling warm during their journey home. It will do that by being ...


-2

Closer to your suggestion #2. His friend is presenting a mug of something to him and tells him to take it with the intention that he will drink it on the way home. His friend does not say what is in the mug, he calls it "that". The "to see you home" part means that it is not to be drunk while he is at his friend's house.


1

It means he might have been able to say back then - during the war - that a bombing mission looked exactly like Bonfire Night. It doesn't tell us to whom he might have been able to say it, but I think it means himself: "the same voice he’d heard inside him when he was a bomb aimer". There is a suggestion that the comparison eases his distressing ...


2

Yes, that is right. Distilling (in the literally sense) is a method of purifying a spirit, or separating different volatile chemicals. A highly distilled vodka is one which is mostly pure alcohol So by analogy a highly distilled form of the character shows the pure characteristics or "expresses the essence of the character".


1

"Help" in this case means "prevent" or "avoid". Merriam-Webster's definition is: to refrain from : AVOID The author means: because the name is traditionally associated with authoritarian rule, no one can prevent (or avoid) the feeling of being uncomfortable with their power and influence.


1

Without getting too into the coding technicals, "to branch" means to split, or to fork. Imagine a tree - a tree has branches, so it will split from the trunk into its different branches. In the above paragraph, this means that a given application might make different choices, and proceed along different 'branches' -- in this case, meaning something ...


6

I always thought the term originated with a dog-food company whose manager advertised that its product was so good, he ate it himself. But there's a bit of a connotation that people in the company aren't using their own product because it stinks, and that's something that needs to change. (50 years ago I did a vacation job in a Siemens electronics lab. They ...


1

In English, when you have a compound subject with "and" or "or", the rule is: If it's "and", the subject is plural. If it's "or", then if each part is singular the combined phrase is singular, and if each part is plural the combined phrase is plural. If one is singular and the other is plural, you go by the one that is ...


15

First “dog food” has become an idiom, which means “use your own product”. This is not about using a pre-release version of your product, but using your product at all. Note that this only applies to certain types of product, you wouldn’t expect a company developing ag-software to be running a farm and so wouldn’t expect them to be dog fooding their ...


3

This is a common enough phrase that most dictionaries will give you the meaning. Since the verb is transitive, taking the object "State", we know that the correct meaning in the link above is number 4: to allow to have a share "State" here is the name of an organization, for example "The State Department" in the US. The ...


0

"That" is a relative pronoun, and it links the relative clause "are “not good enough.”" to the noun it modifies, "spouses". The relative clause is clearly a restrictive relative clause, and so it means that some prospective spouses are not good enough. But looking at the context you note that these people haven't married yet. So ...


48

The original phrase was "to eat your own dog food", with the meaning of "to use your own products (no matter how bad they might be) because it will help better the company or product itself." Over the years, it seems that phrase got lexicalized to simply "to dogfood." Why was "dog food" chosen? I had always thought ...


8

There is an idiom among programmers "eat the dog food". It means that you are using the software that you are developing as part of your normal suite of programmes used to develop software. The metaphor seems to be that "dogfood" is the worst thing that is edible. Software that is dogfood is not good enough for release but it is usable. ...


0

They mean "bred from" in the sense of "used as breeding stock", so that future generations of seeds will be "bred from" the seeds being described here. "In their turn" does in fact mean "in sequence" in this case. The new seeds that survive hardship will be selected for planting "in their turn", ...


0

This often happens when an active voice clause using verb + preposition + object is put into the passive voice with the object becoming the subject. For example: I passed by the store. <-- Active voice The store was passed by. <-- Passive voice You can see that the preposition ("by") gets stranded without an object. Something similar ...


1

If you check out the documentation, you will see that the class extends BeanFactory. To build on something means to take it as a basis and develop it further. In this case, the foundation is "the notion of a 'bean factory'" and "application-framework services" are built on top of that. Application Context = Bean Factory + application-...


3

A "marginal current of dissent" is how the author regards the opinions of those who think the Islamic Republic is aberrant, illegitimate and temporary. Dissent is difference of opinion, in this case, difference with what the author regards as the popular support for the Islamic Republic. The word current means a continuing tendency: Merriam-Webster ...


2

It‘s wrong. I‘m pretty sure it was just a typo, because as far as I see there is no reason this rule wouldn‘t apply in this case. It should be “When I meet him, I will explain”


7

It likely originates from the "I ❤ NY" advertising campaign in the late 70s to promote New York as a tourist destination. It was very popular as a t-shirt design, set out like this. Image & article - WIkipedia - I Love New York It's supposed to be pronounced as "I Love New York" but increasingly became parodied as, "I heart New ...


3

In this context channel means to act like another person. to invoke the style or characteristics of another person You might see it in more fantastic settings being used to describe allowing the spirit or ghost of a deceased person to speak or act through the first individual's body. In this case the excerpt is using it in a much more common metaphorical ...


13

It's a verbal description of a heart-shaped symbol as a logogram for the word "love". Though the widespread use of emoji has made such logograms more common, this particular usage goes back several decades. An old ad campaign promoting tourism in New York state used it in 1977; I suspect that was not the first such usage, though. The word "...


1

In many chat apps, you would write ❤️ as :heart:. The message “I❤️U” might be read out loud as either, “I love you,” or “I heart you.” In this case, the author was choosing to be very informal, in humorous contrast to the serious topic, and to Dick Cheney being from an older generation that stereotypically wouldn’t talk that way.


-2

Are you the best it's ever gonna get for her? it's: here refer to her. ever: refer to the entire life of the person. gonna get: going to get. I hope this may help you.


30

It means "Cheney ❤️ waterboarding" In graffitti or text-speak you often write "loves" with a heart symbol, and here the graffiti style is being represented in words with "hearts"


3

As it stands, it would probably be understood as A, meaning "Nobody thought we had a chance [while] entering this season," that is, the final phrase becomes participular. If you added the word of you'd get the second meaning: "Nobody thought we had a chance of entering this season," meaning "a chance to enter."


3

He is complete with respect to the expected clothing of a gentleman of the time and place. It seems like there is a formal dance of some kind happening. Thus there would be formal clothing. In some times and places that might be a tuxedo. In other times it might be very different. This is supported by the formal speech given and the bow. So it is saying that ...


0

MORE CONTEXT!! is always, always, always better when asking meaning-in-context questions... "Kid leather" is a kind of soft leather made from kidskin, that is, the skin of young goats (sometimes it is made from the skin of other young animals, like lambs or calves). "Kid gloves" are gloves made of kid leather. Because the leather is soft ...


0

He was correctly dressed (presumably for a dance or ball) in every detail, including those white kid gloves.


2

to move to a beat = to dance, basically, metaphor, live refuse to move to a human beat = animals and insects and fish Those organisms move to another beat. There is a very old cliché in English: to march to the beat of a different drum. A drum creates a beat; the sentence plays on that meaning. Animal life marches to the beat of a drum that is not the one ...


3

For Leopold and fellow conservationists, encountering things that refuse to move to a human beat gives a sudden feeling of excitement, elatement, or pleasure; it enlivens life. A rush noun (SUDDEN FEELING) a sudden strong emotion or physical feeling: The memory of who he was came back to him with a rush. I had my first cigarette for a year and felt a sudden ...


1

Another angle: There is no "ascend" in aviation jargon, only climb (however, there is "descend"). "Climb" means increasing altitude till reaching announced level. It does not matter which altitude (Qnh,Qfe). "to" or "up" are rarely used to shorted communication. Usual conversation: ATC: Callsign1, Climb and ...


2

A conveyance is a means of transport (2). Some dictionaries say it's either old-fashioned or formal. A lift is a conveyance. It transports people or freight. A system of traction cables is also a conveyance. It transports things attached to it: a lift car, a cable car.


1

It simply means on a vehicle. One of the meanings of car is 'the compartment in which the passengers sit'.


0

This colocation is a figure of speech. A tribute is an acknowledgement of respect or admiration. If they are "gushing" there are lots of big tributes that are flow continuously, like water "gushing" from a pipe. The other collation is to "pay tribute to someone". This comes from the other meaning of "tribute" as money ...


2

The only thing that counts in this usage of the present perfect is whether the period of time is finished or not. I've seen him once today. [the day is not over]. Obviously, if the period of time is not finished, there is always the possibility of seeing him again. But the possibility of an action does not trigger the present perfect. Here's a typical ...


0

When "gushing" is used in connection with "tributes", "praise" or a similar term, it generally means "embarrassingly overflowing or excessive", or at least it carries a negative connotation. Here it may just mean "strong and widespread tributes" and serves as an emphasizer. But that hint of negative meaning ...


2

The sentence I've seen him today is proper whether or not it is likely that the act of seeing him will occur again that same day. However when the episode is clearly closed, many people prefer to use the simple past: I saw him today. To take an extreme example, suppose thar he has been found dead and the speaker is a witness being interrogated by the ...


3

This isn’t a commonly-used phrase. A search of the Web found your question, links to the article you cite, an advertisement for a warm blanket two lovebirds could cuddle in, and some accidental hits where one sentence ends with something like “in this climate,” and the next begins with something like, “Cuddling kittens ....” I wonder if the author meant, “...


2

So, assuming for "fettle up", the meanings "arrange" or "accomplish" that you have found, here's a gloss: The match (between you and me) is an attractive one. Some old cats would lap up tea all night to arrange such a match = Some individuals would go to any lengths to secure that. If you don't know what a cat lapping is, ...


1

The two phrases below mean the same thing: climb 3000 metres ascend 3000 metres and the two phrases below mean the same thing: climb to 3000 metres ascend to 3000 metres The word "to" changes the meaning. The first is to increase your altitude by 3000 metres. So for example if you are flying at 2000 metres and you ascend 3000 metres or climb ...


1

Yes, in the context of a project, the "timeline" usually means the expected schedule, and a "slip" tends to mean when the expected dates have to be moved to later dates because the project has been taking more time than was expected.


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