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42

Literally it means "I would refuse to go inside, even if you paid me a million bucks ($1000000) to go inside." It is hyperbole. It is understood as meaning "I really didn't want to go inside". Mum: Eat up your vegetables Child: They taste horrid. I wouldn't eat them for a million bucks. It is nothing to do with the price of the ...


15

The audio is right and the subtitles are wrong. Further, the expression works with or without a final verb. "The hell he is." = "He's not." (with reference to whatever was just said) "The hell he's lying." = "He's not lying." It's an expression that simply adds emphasis. It makes no literal sense in any way I can ...


9

Your interpretation of for a million bucks to mean the fee was a million dollars is not 100% wrong. In this dialogue, it would indeed mean that: A: What do I have to do to get inside? B: You can get inside for a million bucks. But in the passage you've quoted, a well-known idiom is formed. It is signaled by the negated subjunctive: I wouldn't have [...


7

"I wouldn't do it for a million bucks" is an idiom. "Bucks" is also slang for US dollars. So it means, "even if I was offered a million dollars (or some other outrageously huge amount) to do it, I wouldn't." It is used to emphasise that the person feels very strongly, that they would not do the stated thing. Even if they were ...


2

A beggar’s bench here in Quebec (banc de quêteux) is a long bench equipped with hinges so that the seat could be open to form a bed. That bed was used to host a beggar for a night. Sort of a hide-a-bed of old times. The homeowners would put hay in it as a mattress for the night which ensured that it would make noise if the beggar stood up during the night, ...


2

There's an idiomatic expression "<to> think it <adjective>..." that means "think [that it is/was] <adjective>...". For example, if I say "He thinks it inappropriate she left so early" I simply mean "He thinks that it was inappropriate that she left so early". This construction can also be used with ...


2

Context matters. If the surrounding context makes it clear, you can leave out information that would otherwise be necessary. Be careful. Don't drive too fast. Don't brake in a leaning position. This is unclear, and could be understood as "don't brake when your body is leaning forward." The context is mixing various safety topics and doesn't ...


2

PC = product change. It is a term used when changing credit cards within the same provider. https://www.nerdwallet.com/article/credit-cards/credit-card-product-change: You can ask the issuer to "product change" your existing credit card to a different version within the issuer's portfolio.


2

In this paragraph, "to-be" is denoting that the referenced individual was not the Buddha yet. For example, we can apply the same to a pregnant woman: The young mother-to-be wept with joy as she viewed the ultrasound of her unborn child. Since a pregnant woman is not yet a mother, the use of "to-be" denotes that she is expecting or is ...


2

A socialite is an extraverted person. Someone who is vain cares a lot about their public image and personal appearance. "Whoever is X is Y." is a sentence construction meaning that all the people who are X (socialites) are also Y (vain). The opposite does not necessarily have to hold; not all vain people need to be socialites.


2

There will no longer be room to perform illegal actions. In the context of the show, the crew of the spaceship Serenity are a group of smugglers, thieves, and political dissidents that would like to avoid governmental oversight from the Alliance so that they can continue to perform their illegal activities. So, in this context, "slip about" means ...


1

Pragmatically (that is using general knowledge about motorbikes) we know that both the bike and you are leaning as you turn the bike. Someone who has never seen a bike might not realise this, but most people know that you have to lean with the bike as you turn. Idiomatically I'd suggest an alternative: "Don't brake while cornering". You don't ...


1

It is referring to the assumed 'clandestine event' mentioned in the previous sentence. Isabel is worried that her response: "I'm afraid I find that very difficult to believe." will lead Rock to assume that there were interactions between Isabel and Lord Nicholas. Then she hints to the reader that those assumptions about their interactions would ...


1

Grammatically it is equally acceptable to say "We forbid you to apply to university" and "We forbid you to matriculate at this university". However the word "matriculate" is quite rare and technical. The meaning is "complete the formal process of enrollment at a university". It is often used to mean "pass the ...


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