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6

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/whether-you-say-freakin-friggin-or-frickin-depends-on-where-youre-from In this case, it's used as a softened version of the F-word.


3

This is a pretty common phrase. It is often used to describe someone who is quickly achieving something, repetitively making a good move, experiencing a streak of success. Imagine a batsman hitting 5 sixes in a row, or Steph Curry dropping 8 three pointers in a quarter (that wouldn't be a surprise though). Cambridge defines the phrase as "experiencing a ...


2

"Be expected to" and "needed to" are not general synonyms. Our guests are expected to arrive before two o'clock does not at all imply that Our guests need to arrive before two o'clock. Nor do I believe that "need" is socially considered to be rude, at least not in the U.S. However, in your specific context, you are practically correct to equate "are ...


2

In a rowing motion, the handles of the oars get both pulled toward you and pushed away from you. However, we usually focus on the motion when the blades of the oar are dipped in the water. You can row either way, but normally the blades are dipped when you pull, so that the boat moves in the direction opposite the way the rower is facing. However, rowers ...


2

It can mean two things: I play soccer regularly, but I am not actually engaged in playing right at this moment. I know how to play soccer, and have played regularly in the past, but at this stage in my life I'm not on a team or otherwise playing regularly.


2

To get through (something) means to succeed or finish SUCCEED FINISH I've got a stack of paperwork to get through before I can go out. -- Cambridge Dictionary The Cambridge dictionary does not describe this phrasal verb as informal, and says it is accepted in British English, American English and "business English". You may have ...


2

What is the difference between "in time" and "over time"? Like you mentioned, "in time" and "over time" seem to be synonyms. Of course "in time" has another meaning also, of "meeting a deadline." Is there a particular reason the writer of The American Pageant prefers "in time" here? Very interesting. I have not thought about this topic before, but "over ...


2

I wouldn't paraphrase any of those sentences in any of those ways. I would assume the speaker meant: I like to drink my coffee cold. Or, put even more simply: I prefer iced coffee. I think it's important to point out that a phrase like want/would like/prefer something (to be) is context-dependent, and one paraphrase won't necessarily apply to all ...


1

From the Oxford English Dictionary: [behind a paywall] A. adv. Used predicatively: in a more favourable or advantageous position; esp. better provided with money or other resources. Cf. well off adv. Also: Frequency (in current use): Origin: Formed within English, by conversion. Etymon: of prep. And finally from that entry, also relevant here: A. adv. ...


1

No. Something that imbues can do so with qualities or feelings, but not actions. The cool weather imbued him with a refreshing feeling. The color imbued a sad mood to the painting. The cool weather inspired him to hurry. The color inspired him to buy a shirt of the same color.


1

The difference is subtle, and often trivial. Consider these two definitions from the Lexico/Oxford dictionary: progress (n): Forward or onward movement towards a destination. progression (n): The process of developing or moving gradually towards a more advanced state. If we think of "progress" as simply moving forward, and a "progression" as moving ...


1

"I will give all-out of me" is not a natural construction. There are two idioms you seem to be combining here: one is to go all out, and the other is to give something your all. They both mean that you'll try your hardest or best. So a more natural version could be "I will go all out [to do x]" or "I will give [the task] my all" or "I will give ...


1

It means a "longer and more detailed discussion". In this context a discussion is probably not a spoken conversation, but a piece of academic writing that considers multiple points of view. Programmers in C++ should avoid using namespace std. For a fuller discussion of why this is the case, read the answers to Why is “using namespace std;” considered bad ...


1

From the context you would have to assume that the "English Vocabulary Profile" was developed from the "Cambridge Learner Corpus". Any other interpretation doesn't make sense. In reading you must be thinking about the meanings of words and not only the grammatical connections between them.


1

I agree that it's difficult to imagine a whole tree being cut into strips, and it's much easier to imagine the trunk being cut into thin strips. Because this is so obvious, I think the writer is trusting that the reader will understand that only the trunk can be cut into strips, so they don't bother to clarify that they're just talking about the trunk.


1

Generally, you say something (to somebody), but you tell somebody something. That's just the way English is.


1

When we talk about veterans, one of the literal meanings is somebody who has fought in a war, as you already know. It can also mean somebody who has the experience of doing something or has done it for a long time. The second meaning is the one F. Scott Fitzgerald is using. He means that since he doesn't judge what people are saying to him he sometimes has ...


1

Answered in the comments: "You would not say concerned of either. It's concerned about and anxious about. Using of with either word is unidiomatic at best and ungrammatical at worst. If you insist on the specific phrase anxious of, then the answer here will be that it's wrong. You can change the word that comes before the preposition (such that of becomes ...


1

The clock has a resolution of milliseconds. Yes. The clock is available in a resolution of milliseconds. No. The clock is available with a resolution of milliseconds. This is probably alright, although somehow not perfect. The following sort of phrasing might sound better: The clock is available with a resolution of either seconds or ...


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