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35

"Lingua" is not an English word. To my knowledge it is only found (in English) in the expression lingua franca which comes from Italian and refers to a "common language" between two or more groups of people. It is a loan word. When referring to the anatomical thing, we always say "tongue" and never "lingua." "Lingua" itself is Latin, and this root is the ...


5

lingua isn't used on its own, but the latin root is part of a lot of words. sublingual - below the tongue linguist - someone who studies languages bilingual - someone who speaks 2 languages linguine (or linguini) - a delicious pasta, that somehow relates to tongues.


3

Your revised phrasing is not quite right, as the author is still actually making the claim, it’s just that they are also claiming to be unsure of its validity. This isn’t meant to be taken literally though; the author still knows they are the author. It’s an example of hyperbole, in this case likely used to express gratitude to contributors in a sort of ...


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The second one is the right one: "Polite society is outraged by the picture". Semantically, it is impossible for an image to be outraged so your first option wouldn't work, but it's also an incorrect interpretation, syntactically.


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The author is just being humble, I think. He is acknowledging that without their help, he would not have been able to write that revised edition (at least not to that quality or standard). He acknowledges the considerable amount of contribution made by others. He is saying that it would not be right to take all the credit for all of that work. Of course, ...


2

The simple explanation is that in anatomy, latin terms are used (for adjectives "dorsal"= of the back, "ventral"= of the belly/front, "jugular"=of the throat, "ischemic", "sciatic", "cranial", ... ; or for parts, like "retina", "vena cava", "atrium", "vestibula", "cranium", ... ). In English, you will find "lingua"/"lingual" almost exclusively used in an ...


2

A "tee" is an abbreviation for a t-shirt. In the image, the turkey on the left is wearing a t-shirt and the image printed on the t-shirt is of a skinny turkey body. So a 'Skinny Turkey Tee' is a t-shirt that has a skinny turkey printed on it. The joke is that the turkeys are wearing the t-shirts in an attempt to look thin so that they won't get slaughtered ...


2

In US English (and perhaps other types of English, I'm not sure), this is really an idiomatic expression. I think it must be short for something like: "[That was an excellent] way to ... [do some activity]!" It can be used either as sincere praise: "Way to use your athletic skills!" or sarcastically, as a real reprimand: "Way to make us all look ...


1

It is business jargon. An employee who "delivers" means that the employee makes the company more successful. The company has set various goals for its employees. If the employee is delivering "against the goals" I would understand this to mean that they are being successful measured using the goals. You use "against" when using something to measure with. ...


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Lemonade is being used as a non-count or mass noun, because the enquiry was about the nature or composition of the drink. What is the black stuff in that pile on the ground? It is coal. What is that white powder on your hands (e.g. to a baker)? It is flour. What are honey gushers? It [a honey gusher] is lemonade. Mass noun


1

The boys went into the room. = The boys entered the room. Generally, we would not say go inside the room unless, for example, the room was hidden behind a secret panel. Or, if you want to refer to inside and outside the room. They stayed inside the room upstairs while the robbers stole the money downstairs. The inside of the room or house was dark. Rooms ...


1

"Inside" places more emphasis on the fact that the boys are now inside of something, and also places more direct emphasis on the room as a physical place, as oppose to it being considered more conceptually. It naturally includes awareness of its opposite, "outside". It would therefore be a bit odd to use "went inside the room" if they had only come from ...


1

In this case, we are not dealing with a grammatical question, but a semantic one. All verbs mentioned here would fit well grammatically speaking, however, as we saw on Collins definition: to cause normally implies something bad. Therefore, other verbs would fit better there, such as: Persuade, lead, encourage, induce..


1

"Experimental physicists don’t like theoretical physicists, because [...] they don’t really work at all." The joke is that theoretical physicists don't do any work. Usually the weekend is {Sat, Sun}. If you had a meeting on Saturday, you would spoil one weekend. But for theoretical physicists the weekend is {wed, thu, fri, sat, sun, mon, tue, wed}. So a ...


1

“Keeping the complaining customer satisfied” refers to a process whereby things are continually done, or effort is made in some way, to make sure the customer is satisfied. To me the statement sounds a bit odd, as the customer is already said to be dissatisfied (complaining), though they are likely referring to customers who are prone to complaining, and it’...


1

It means that the scientists are following the wrong lines of thought. A line of thought is a common idiom referring to the logic that someone followed to conclude something. For example, if I told you that I enjoyed eating at McDonald's, your line of thought might look like this: McDonald's serves primarily hamburgers. -> NegativeFriction likes eating at ...


1

This looks like a non-standard use to me. The phrase "flung theirs hands up" (or close variations) is a cliché - or actually, it's a part of a number of different clichés. You may read about people flinging up their hands in supplication, in horror, in defeat, in shock, in celebration, etc. It tends to have a literal meaning, describing a gesture (or ...


1

The noun lingua is not used (Is it even in an English dictionary?). It's probably been made redundant in the formation of the English language from its ancestors. Tongue is always used as the noun, and can mean "language" as well, for example mother tongue (the language one learned from one's mother). On the other hand, the adjectival form lingual is used, ...


1

I cannot think of any use of lingua however sublingual means under the tongue. Sub means under or below and lingual means tongue. The word tongue is not used for the anatomical structure alone. For instance, the tongue of the shoe.


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Yes, those are good explanations of the meaning. Taking you "over" someone else means to choose you and not someone else. So, the full meaning of the question would be, "why should we choose you instead of one of the other applicants."


1

This may help. Suppose the answer to a question is "Yes, they fought." This would have two different meanings for two different questions: Did Joe and Pete fight? Yes, they fought. Did Joe and Pete fight in the war? Yes, they fought. In the first case, Joe and Pete are understood to have fought each other. In the second case, they are understood to ...


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