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45

Has by is not a single expression; rather, it's the end of one and the start of another. She tries not to react but knows she has by the smirk on Frank’s face is in two parts: She tries not to react but knows she has by the smirk on Frank’s face We might expand the sentence to make this easier to understand: She tries not to react but knows she has ...


5

It is not really unusual or uncommon in English. It is simply inserting a clause with the reason into the sentence. That is, it would be reasonable to write She tries not to react but knows she has, the threat in the not-so-veiled statement plain. Inserting "by the smirk on Frank's face" just provides the reason she knows. It could equally ...


4

The lyrics are on record as not being philosophically meaningful. However, I would presume that all would think like me, that indeed, "as the miller told his tale" was a direct reference to the Miller's Tale in The Canterbury Tales. But apparently I'd be wrong. The lyricist probably did it deliberately to make the song sound literary and highbrow. ...


4

If you look at the shape of the eye brows you can see the lines like two mountain curves. This picture from Pentaxuser is called "frowning mountains": You can see the same shape like frowning eyebrows which I have indicated with red lines. I have found the phrase "frown on/upon" explained as disapprove of, dislike, discourage, take a ...


4

There is nothing in the definition of either that connects mountains to frowns, nor is it a common idiom. It is probably used in these specific cases for literary effect. I think it's an allusion to how one would feel in front of a large, powerful, frowning authority figure. It's intended to be a little bit intimidating or ominous.


3

This person is having, or taking, or 'getting' (US), a bath. He is lying in a bath (British) or 'bathtub' (US). This person is showering. He is having, or taking, a shower. He is standing under a shower.


2

There is a difference in grammar. "Fire" is being used as a noun. "Burn" is being used as a verb (I'll note that there is a verb "to fire" and noun "burn" but these have different, but related meanings) There are also two etymologies: fire has meant "fire" the substance, since Proto-Indo-European, and comes ...


2

Items of furniture, including heavy padded armchairs and sofas, often have what are called 'castors'. One person could wheel or roll such a chair to move it, e.g. when cleaning, making the room tidy, or to re-position it. They help avoid damage to carpets or floors. It would be possible to move a chair while sitting, as described. The text is from the short ...


2

moment very important: Related to "momentous."


2

It's a nickname, like "Champ" in the next sentence and "Skipper" earlier in the quotation.


2

According to the following, it was not deliberate. Procol Harum's lyricist Keith Reid wrote the words to this song... The lyric, "As the miller told his tale" sounds like a reference to "The Miller's Tale," from Chaucer's English novel The Canterbury Tales... Reid, however, disproves this theory. He told us: "I'd never read The ...


2

From the article, below, the subject is that a stilted, more traditional version of Arabic language is used rather than a modern one. Much is made of the fact that multiple translations are made for small populations of small countries while larger also disparate speaking countries have to get by with one or two. Arabic being one. The examples given ...


1

In #1, the part of speech is an adjective. That "acting" modifies "subject". In #2, the part of speech is an adjective. That "acting" modifies "something". "Acting" is a present participle, and it can assume several parts of speech, such as: [noun (aka gerund)]: Running a marathon takes me about four hours. [...


1

A simple answer is, "catch his foot on a step" means to "trip over" the step. I've probably introduced yet another idiom. However hands are absolutely not involved. Catch, in this sentence, implies involuntary interrupted movement, not something you do with your hands, which is a completely different (if more usual) usage.


1

"To catch" can also mean "to accidentally trap". Say you are going upstairs, and you don't raise your foot high enough to completely clear the riser, and you accidentally trip over the riser instead of placing your foot firmly on the next step. That is "catching your foot on a step". Similar usage is when you "catch a ...


1

A shower is a kind of bath: American Heritage Dictionary "shower" intransitive verb: To wash oneself in a shower. Noun a. A bath in which the water is sprayed on the bather in fine streams from a showerhead, usually secured overhead: take a shower. b. The stall or tub in which such a bath is taken. While a shower is a kind of bath, and showering ...


1

"Bathe" or "take a bath" practically universally means to wash by filling a tub and lie down in it to submerse yourself in hot water. "Shower" or "take a shower" means to wash by standing underneath a device which sprinkles (or pours) water over you from a height. "Bathe" can also mean to indulge in the ...


1

dropping messages upon the soul means sending messages to the soul. screened means hidden or protected (a screen of trees can hide your messy garden, glasses can screen your eyes from the bright light). To screen means to shelter or conceal.


1

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle talks about 'staring villas" which resemble human faces with large rectangular eyes which seem to 'stare' at the viewer.


1

A more formal or unambiguous form would be "...but she knows she has done so by ...". In answer to questions like "have you done this" or "have you been there", some people will answer simply "yes I have" and others will answer "yes I have done" or "yes I have been". The preference may be regional; ...


1

The verb tense is very hard for me since my first language is Chinese, which does not have verb tense at all. If there is a good solution to this situation, then it could save me lots of time from learning English. It is hard to memorize all verb tense and their usage.


1

It means he moved his chair along the ground towards the group; he must be in a wheelchair or another kind of chair that has wheels. Hence he was able to "wheel" it up to join the group. He was moving the chair using the heels of his feet as a source of propulsion.


1

Yes, if it were “, which are...” Sort of. It is the verb of the predicate, but “gaining” is also a verb acting as an adjective (a participle).


1

It should probably be "mini-mall", "mini mall", or capitalized "Mini Mall" for an official name such as "Fort Benning Main Post Exchange Mini Mall." "instead of waiting for the light" refers to a red traffic light.


1

"her nose in the air" means that Hadley saw her (the Prada woman) as arrogant. Hadley is pleased (takes a small measure of delight) that the perfect model (Prada woman) has an easily seen imperfection, the lipstick accidentally smeared on her collar.


1

It means that the the speaker believes they must have some sort of control over or input in how/when they die. It essentially means they plan to die on their own terms. "a say in __" means that someone/something's input or voice will matter or be considered in the matter of ___


1

Yes the usage of the word "trap" and the idiom "fall into the trap" sound totally fine to my native speaker ears. See also: https://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/fall+into+the+trap+of+(doing+something) and: https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/fall-into-the-trap-of-doing-something


1

The author is saying that: "To conquer fear is the beginning of wisdom" is true, both when trying to find truth in general, and when trying to live life in a good way. That is, it says that this rule applies both to "the pursuit of truth" and to "the endeavor after a worthy manner of life." The use of "the endeavor after&...


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