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15 votes
Accepted

Can a festival or a celebration like Halloween be "invented"?

It's "unusual" in English to say religious festivals such as Halloween, Christmas, Easter were invented by some particular people. The effect is to emphasize the arbitrary nature of the ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
7 votes

Can a festival or a celebration like Halloween be "invented"?

Holidays can certainly be invented where they did not exist before. Mothers Day, Kwanzaa, Festivus, etc. are all examples of holidays of greater or lesser recognition invented in the 20th century. &...
arp's user avatar
  • 589
5 votes

Can a festival or a celebration like Halloween be "invented"?

You ask if holidays in general can be invented and I'd say yes. In Denmark we have/had 'Store Bededag' (Great Prayer Day) which was instituted in 1686 as replacement for a number of lesser holidays. ...
Hans Kilian's user avatar
5 votes

Can a festival or a celebration like Halloween be "invented"?

"First celebrated" is what I would go with. Halloween was first celebrated in Ireland... You can find a ton of examples of the usage.
cmw's user avatar
  • 314
5 votes

As is a tale, so is life

Whatever you think of Rowling's writing (let alone her politics), she's never been accused of being a great stylist. This is a clumsy phrase. However the full sentence makes things a bit clearer: As ...
Daniel Roseman's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Does "I rushed to do homework" mean I quickly went to my homework and did it at any rate (maybe be fast or slow) or I did the homework quickly?

I don't think it's something very likely to be said. It could be ambiguous, but I would probably interpret it as your first, because for your second I would expect something like I rushed through my ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 76.1k
3 votes

"the tensions of the last WEEKS." OR "the tensions of the last WEEK."?

in the last weeks can mean "in recent weeks". Temperatures in the last weeks have been well above average for this time of year. "in the last weeks" can also mean "in the ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 129k
2 votes

Requesting explanation on the meaning of the word 'Passerby'?

In general, we say "passerby" to mean someone passing by some specific place. (And side note, the technically correct plural is "passersby", but many English speakers say "...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.9k
2 votes

Requesting explanation on the meaning of the word 'Passerby'?

When the word passerby refers to people, it is used by an observer who is at a fixed point - like sitting at a cafe table - seeing people go by: the passersby. If you are walking down a road, the ...
Lambie's user avatar
  • 46.8k
2 votes
Accepted

"to do social media-ing". --- Is it really used like this in daily life?

This is not standard English. It is very informal. In general, we have separate words for the verb and the noun in an activity. Like we say, "Al drove a car." We don't say "he carred&...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.9k
2 votes

Can a festival or a celebration like Halloween be "invented"?

The words invented and invention are always used loosely in English. The derivation of invention is from "discovered", and the implication in English is that the electric bulb, the telephone ...
david's user avatar
  • 165
2 votes

Can a festival or a celebration like Halloween be "invented"?

observed to observe, [formal] to obey a law, rule, or custom: [ … ] The old people in the village still observe the local traditions. / Do you observe Passover? So, Halloween (October 31) was first ...
KrisW's user avatar
  • 1,019
2 votes
Accepted

As is a tale, so is life

When you say that you looked up "as is", I guess you found a meaning like this from the Cambridge Dictionary: in the state that something is in at the present time In this case, though, &...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 60.1k
1 vote
Accepted

Difference between "the number of people you would have thought" OR "the number of people you would think"?

The cited quotation originated in extemporaneous speech, not in edited writing, so it's important to recognize at the outset that we are not dealing here with what the poster describes as "the ...
Sven Yargs's user avatar
1 vote

Adjective placement - why do I sometimes see "meat raw" instead of "raw meat"?

It's the difference between attributive adjectives and predicative adjectives. Attributive adjectives go before the noun and modify it - "raw meat" is an example of this. The meat is raw. ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
1 vote

“ate an animal raw” or “ate a raw animal”

A belated answer, just for the record... It sounds odd to speak of a raw animal because being raw (not cooked) is the natural state of an animal. The expression eat [something] raw refers to eating ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
1 vote

How to reply to "hope you all had a great time celebrating"

Don't overthink it. You could write a short text saying how much you enjoyed the birthday: I had a great time, thanks. We had cake and danced to old records.
James K's user avatar
  • 226k
1 vote

Can a festival or a celebration like Halloween be "invented"?

Yes. Have a festive party with a certain theme or commemorate an event, do it again the next year, make it every year ... et voilá, you got yourself a "traditional festive" that was invented ...
haxor789's user avatar
  • 206
1 vote

Do you say "We have company" even though that person was just a stranger to you?

In its most literal use, 'company' does tend to mean friendly visitors to your home, or that you have someone with you in another settings - someone you would call a companion. Saying "I/we have ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 106k
1 vote

Can a festival or a celebration like Halloween be "invented"?

Invented isn’t appropriate. We can consider instituted as in instituted a festival and apply here: Halloween was instituted ... Usages of the festival example using institute and instituting are also ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

"the tensions of the last WEEKS." OR "the tensions of the last WEEK."?

This is a funny one. As a native English speaker, "the tension of the last weeks" just sounds wrong to me. But I can't say that "last weeks" is wrong, because if someone said, &...
Jay's user avatar
  • 67.9k

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