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30

It means "Cheney ❤️ waterboarding" In graffitti or text-speak you often write "loves" with a heart symbol, and here the graffiti style is being represented in words with "hearts"


13

It's a verbal description of a heart-shaped symbol as a logogram for the word "love". Though the widespread use of emoji has made such logograms more common, this particular usage goes back several decades. An old ad campaign promoting tourism in New York state used it in 1977; I suspect that was not the first such usage, though. The word "...


7

It likely originates from the "I ❤ NY" advertising campaign in the late 70s to promote New York as a tourist destination. It was very popular as a t-shirt design, set out like this. Image & article - WIkipedia - I Love New York It's supposed to be pronounced as "I Love New York" but increasingly became parodied as, "I heart New ...


7

In all of these the singular is only the final link in the chain, and while it specifies that there is at least one it does not necessarily imply uniqueness. It depends on the context in which it is used. If it is not important to the story which brother they were with there may be more. If you were about to say that this engineer recommended a course of ...


6

"de-perplex" is not a standard word in English. However the "de-" prefix is fairly productive, and this means you can create new words by adding "de-", and those words mean "remove", or "do the opposite" However, when there is an existing word that expresses what you want, you should not create a new one. In ...


6

The first question is asking how you feel about the job. For example: are you enjoying it, or are you unhappy with it? The second question is asking how you are doing with your job. For example: are you having trouble with work, or are you making good progress?


4

It's a quirky allusion to the idiomatic square peg in a round hole, used to refer to a situation where someone is not well suited to their circumstances. Which is almost always that way round - people don't normally talk about being a round peg in a square hole. But Gump is saying that he is a metaphorical "round peg" - with the implication that ...


3

A "marginal current of dissent" is how the author regards the opinions of those who think the Islamic Republic is aberrant, illegitimate and temporary. Dissent is difference of opinion, in this case, difference with what the author regards as the popular support for the Islamic Republic. The word current means a continuing tendency: Merriam-Webster ...


3

In this context channel means to act like another person. to invoke the style or characteristics of another person You might see it in more fantastic settings being used to describe allowing the spirit or ghost of a deceased person to speak or act through the first individual's body. In this case the excerpt is using it in a much more common metaphorical ...


3

The word "but" is not always a conjunction. The first definition under 'ADVERB' at Lexico is No more than; only. If you substitute "only" or "no more than" for "but" the meanings become clear: 'tis only a scratch I am no more than a small voice Nowadays this adverbial usage is most often seen in "to name but a ...


3

The "one item" is socks. Specifically, it is the type of socks that has a cushioned sole and is "OD green." (Logically they could be any color, but the type of sock specified by Lt Dan is OD green.) "Cushion sole" is a descriptor of the socks, and "OD green" is a descriptor of the socks as well. The military often uses ...


3

In this case it is exactly what it says. Forrest is saying he was making as much noise as a monkey that is up in a tree when he was talking about "Ping-Ponging, and shrimping, and Mama making a trip up to heaven". In other places "monkey" can imply people with low intelligence or low social graces ("They were acting like a bunch of ...


2

When an activity is sponsored by or required by an official order or organized program, it is done under it. The definition being -- controlled, managed, or governed by, which is quite like saying in accordance with. The work was done under the government insulation program.


2

Most often this statement would be a deduction - the speaker knows that she lives close to her workplace because she walks there (from home). The other meaning (necessity) is allowed by the syntax, and context would make it clear which is the intended meaning. As an example, if the speaker was a support person speaking to a real estate agent about a new ...


2

This is explained by a line later in the episode: Kramer: Well, that's odd, 'cause I feel perfectly at peace with the world- uh! eggs! you! Serenity now, serenity now, serenity now. Someone threw eggs at Kramer. Eggs are often labeled “Grade A” as an indication that they are high quality.


1

In the military, they routinely attach a name to a particular place on a battlefield, like "Hill 137" or "Omaha Beach" or "Point Blue". This enables the soldiers to reference a location quickly and accurately. If you need to call in artillery support, for example, you don't want to get bogged down saying, "You see that ...


1

"to branch" comes from observing trees. The trunk grows in different paths. Then each branch grows in different paths. Then each of those branches grow in different paths, etc. The term "branch" is widely applied to indicate divisions. For example, languages are said to have 3 main branches: Indo-European, Sino-Tibetan and Afro-...


1

Without getting too into the coding technicals, "to branch" means to split, or to fork. Imagine a tree - a tree has branches, so it will split from the trunk into its different branches. In the above paragraph, this means that a given application might make different choices, and proceed along different 'branches' -- in this case, meaning something ...


1

OCS probably means Officer Cadet School: that is training to become an officer in the Army. By contrast, an "enlisted man" is a low-rank soldier. Private is the lowest rank in the Army. The Sergeant is saying with some dialect and heavy irony: You are a very good low-rank soldier. You deserve to go to Officer Cadet School, to train as an officer, ...


1

There's no need for a past perfect at all. You use the past perfect when speaking about events at a time in the past, but you want to refer to an event that occurred before that time. Here you are not talking about an event that occurred before the past time that you were talking about. It's just something that happened. You could use past tense or present ...


1

It means that the same family (or at least some members of it) owned and lived in the same house for that time. (Forrest is exaggerating when he says '1000 years'. European settlement of America started in 1620, and in his state in the 1700s.)


1

It refers to the wrapped chocolates in a box with an assortment of different types. When you reach for one, it could be any one of the different types. Of course, the point of the comparison is that you don't know what is coming next in life - you don't know what you will get from life or from the box of chocolates.


1

If you check out the documentation, you will see that the class extends BeanFactory. To build on something means to take it as a basis and develop it further. In this case, the foundation is "the notion of a 'bean factory'" and "application-framework services" are built on top of that. Application Context = Bean Factory + application-...


1

It's hard to tell since there's so much idiomatic usage here (for instance, it seems that "dumped" means "beat badly," but I'm unfamiliar with that usage). However, I think your definition #3 applies: The speaker is saying that he kept his opponent from winning for half a round; in this sense he "held up" his opponent's victory, ...


1

In many chat apps, you would write ❤️ as :heart:. The message “I❤️U” might be read out loud as either, “I love you,” or “I heart you.” In this case, the author was choosing to be very informal, in humorous contrast to the serious topic, and to Dick Cheney being from an older generation that stereotypically wouldn’t talk that way.


1

The past continuous tense is not only used for actions that happened again and again. It is also used to describe a single instance of an action that was ongoing or continuous for some period of time in the past. For example, this is also past continuous: "I was trying to practice all day yesterday, but my phone kept interrupting me." "Used to&...


1

The emphasis is rather different. The first says he studied at an American University. The second says he travelled to America. (And the reason for him travelling to America was to study at university there). So you could use the first, even if Michael was American: Suppose he studied in Germany for his first degree, then he came home, then he went to an ...


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