13 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

This is enormously family dependent, and rapidly changing. Words like "scamp" or "rapscallion" or "scalliwag" now seem rather dated. "Cheeky monkey" seemed ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
11 votes

Use of "in" within "I'll blow your house in"

to blow something in: "in" meaning "inward" The image I get is that someone is outside, blowing towards the walls of the house. The force of the air is so strong that the walls ...
nschneid's user avatar
  • 5,111
10 votes
Accepted

What does wicky mean in the phrase 'wicky wacky day'?

It's a kind of reduplication. It has no meaning in itself; it's sound-play that only serves to intensify, to make it wackier. Why "wicky"? This is a vowel-shift reduplication, and many of ...
Luke Sawczak's user avatar
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6 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

Out of those rascal is common enough to be understood (if still a little old-fashioned) and the most likely to be affectionate out of context. Most of those words are usually used to refer to adults ...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
5 votes

Get the meaning in "not by the hair of my chinny chin chin"

This phrase is very specific to "The Three Little Pigs". You won't find it anywhere else, and you won't see it varied in ways that change its rhythm. If it does appear elsewhere, it's an ...
the-baby-is-you's user avatar
4 votes

Use of "in" within "I'll blow your house in"

As @Lambie states, one must deal with the text as it is presented. A given passage might be infelicitous, or perhaps downright wrong, so you might wish to make corrections. (BTW, a student in my class ...
DrMoishe Pippik's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

"Windows tilted open to the chill day"

I think this is simply a poetic variation of the stock phrase open to the weather. day does not have a calendar sense there, but refers to what the day has brought (chill); and "open to" ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
3 votes
Accepted

When does the end of the trip happen if we say "they had a trip to a candy factory"?

The phrases "beginning of a trip" and "end of a trip" are not rigidly defined in English. You have to look at the context and apply common sense. "Beginning of a trip" ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.6k
3 votes
Accepted

meaning of "provision" here

The second, although in this case it's not so much a condition as a specific item in a legal document.
SoronelHaetir's user avatar
2 votes

Use of "in" within "I'll blow your house in"

This usage is valid, but obscure To "blow something in" suggests causing the thing to implode. Contextually, it implies one or more walls of the house being blown inward, resulting in the ...
Matthew's user avatar
  • 241
2 votes
Accepted

What does it mean "The scene struck him immediately and forcibly, cutting through the beer haze like the flick of a wet towel"

"The scene" is whatever he saw. I haven't read the book so I have no idea what that is. From what follows, I guess it was something surprising or horrifying. Yes, "beer" here ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.6k
2 votes
Accepted

Does the meaning of "as with" depend on the context?

In each example, the sense is as is the case with... The second one says that Symbolic logic has grown beyond the circumstances of its birth, in the same way that other branches of mathematics have ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 54.9k
2 votes

Is there any nuance between "wildflower" and "wild flower"?

"Wild" as an adjective has a range of senses, many of which don't apply to flowers. It can mean "not domesticated". And in this sense it has exactly the same meaning as wild ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
2 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

I used to read and hear imp, it sounds almost cute but perhaps it's not so common nowadays. She's [a bit of] an imp This tells the listener that the small child sometimes misbehaves. I believe ...
Mari-Lou A's user avatar
  • 27.1k
2 votes

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

Some possibilities would be "scamp" or "terror". Note, phrases like this would usually be used as an exclamation, rather than as full sentences: You little scamp! You terror!
Daniel Roseman's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

What does "so I'm not" mean?

The key part of the sentence is "I'm not understanding", which means the same as "I do not understand". Bella is saying the because Duncan can also do the same as was done to Bella ...
DJClayworth's user avatar
  • 4,490
1 vote

What does 'However, we will not depart further from the traditional account than is justified.' mean?

"than is justified" complements "further" further comparative ... than is justified Don't make the curry spicier comparative than is palatable for the children. OK, I will not ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
1 vote

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

It seems to be BrE-specific, but the first word that came to mind for me was "tyke". From Cambridge dictionary: a child who behaves badly in a way that is funny rather than serious
Especially Lime's user avatar
1 vote

What words of endearment may I use for describing a misbehaving child?

A pretty non offensive, endearing way to refer to a misbehaving child is to replace their name with 'Trouble'. You can also use it when they are not misbehaving at the moment but often tend to. I once ...
Judith Jones's user avatar
1 vote

Is there any nuance between "wildflower" and "wild flower"?

There is no notable difference between wildflower and wild flower. It's a fairly common occurrence for English speakers to combine (or sometimes separate) words that appear together. Because there ...
fatalerrer's user avatar

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