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24

Public schools in the UK are fee-paying schools, of which Eton and Harrow are probably the most prestigious (but there are many less expensive ones). For an explanation of the name, see the Wikipedia page under 'Early history'. Polish refers to a metaphorical 'sheen', a poise acquired from attendance at a prestigious school.


19

If you go back 300 years or so, most people didn't get any education. Only the wealthy could afford it. There were two types of education: Private education, at home with a tutor. Or Public education at a school. These schools became known as "public schools" in contrast to private tutoring. But they were always fee-charging schools. Other ...


11

In short: it means you have the accent and mannerisms of a posh upper-class person. The other answers cover the basics, but I don't think emphasise enough the role of public schools in maintaining the UK's fairly rigid class structure. For example, 7% of the population of the UK go to private schools (which, confusingly, is a category which includes public ...


11

"Dad's latest wife" implies that he has been married several times. Apparently five years is his record (the longest time any of his marriages has lasted). To date = until now. Jules can't be bothered to get to know her new stepmother until this one has 'passed the five-year mark'.


8

Yes "mark" is used in the sense of a record. It comes from things like "high-water mark" -- an actual mark on something showing an important distance. Using it with time is a common idiom. The word "mark" in "5 year mark" tells us 5 years is special. Then the author tells us why. A similar use: "He's past the 3-...


7

I think your claim is that the statement "either there is a professor of linguistics or there isn't" is a tautology and therefore not a supposition at all. And I think you're right. Unless we want to dive into the philosophy of existence, "X exists" is a true or false statement. If we call that statement P, then from a standpoint of ...


6

The phrase is "The best X a person could ask for" which means "the best possible example of an X." It means the person being thanked is the most perfect possible version that the author could hope to know or be friends with. Usually this is something like "the best editor a person could ask for" or "the best wife" or &...


6

We learned definitely implies that they heard (or read) that that was the case, not that they saw something and deduced it themselves. It is a rather literary use of learn - people don't use it much in ordinary speech.


5

If you look up so in a dictionary you will see that some meanings are "to the extent" or "to such an extent/degree." In fact so much has its own entry at wiktionary. "Only so much so fast" is a limiting expression; the implication is that the body can heal some amount and no more in a set amount of time and no less. The ...


5

Your first interpretation is correct - he kicked the door shut. In this context, "to" is used as an adverb describing the result of the action, i.e. that the door is now closed. From Merriam-Webster: to adverb 3a: into contact especially with the frame —used of a door or a window // the door snapped to


4

Here the word "to" means "into contact especially with the frame — used of a door or a window" (Merriam Webster)


4

'In real life' means 'in the real world and not in a story'. The speaker says that Georgina 'can't move her face much'. Although Hannah may have read about Botox and seen pictures of its effects, she has never before met and seen someone who has had Botox treatment.


4

Some people in academia, usually students, may take a temporary job in the long summer vacation to earn money. This is called a summer job. Teachers or other employees at schools and universities can also do this to make extra money. Really, if you have regular employment with a large gap during the summer, you can call any temporary position you hold then a ...


4

I didn't see any indication on the linked page that that presupposition has anything wrong with it. The page simply points out that a presupposition is implied by the question, and will be recognized by the hearer of the question. It is a yes/no question.


4

It's a common misquotation of a phrase from Shakespeare's Hamlet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_lady_doth_protest_too_much,_methinks Hannah is being over-emphatic in saying that she only caught the show by accident.


4

An honest mistake is a true or a genuine mistake. There's no such thing as a "dishonest" mistake—something is either an accident or it isn't. Rather, the term "honest mistake" is meant to contrast with an accidentally-on-purpose mistake. For example: Two coworkers don't get along. One of them accidentally takes a drink that the other had ...


3

What's being presupposed in addition to the polarity Considering the intent of that particular example, I believe that this sentence is simply explicitly highlighting the trivial, perhaps tautological presupposition to illustrate that even though we might not think about it, such sentences imply the polarity and if we want to be careful, that should be ...


3

Jules dipped her fingers in her champagne and splashed some on Charlie, as a playful "punishment" for calling her a "stuck up princess" "Oi!" is an interjection. It is the sound that people make when they are annoyed. Or to get their attention. "Hey" would be an alternative. But the context here is that Jules and ...


3

Your guesses make sense. In context I imagine looking at Jules, the Charlie, then back again. But the others readings also make sense and are possible. Its ambiguous, but only in an aspect that isn't critical to the meaning. The meaning is that Johnno indicates, without speaking (just by the direction that he is looking), that he is asking about Charlie ...


3

It would appear to modify "jackets", but it doesn't really matter to your understanding. "Next" is a well-known clothing store that sells off-the-peg clothing at reasonable prices. They sell suits and jackets, and most other types of clothing. "Tailored" does mean cut to fit by a tailor. A tailored jacket might cost five or ten ...


3

Quoting the Wiktionary definition of the phrase guilty as charged: (literally, law) Guilty to the same extent as one is charged; guilty to all the court's accusations. (by extension) Truly, indeed, verily responsible for having done something. The exclamation "Guilty!" has the same two meanings: The literal one admitting that you committed a ...


3

It is quote from Shakespeare. It is used (in a humourous way) when someone is making denials of something so strongly that it implies that they are not telling the truth. Suppose a child has been playing with her brother outside. She comes to her mother and says "I been really kind to Jack and I haven't hurt him at all or taken the ball from him." ...


3

It means "You should be living in a proper house. Why are you living here?" It means that his words (advising her to live somewhere else) are even worse than what her Mum says to her. That is, his words are more concerned and worrying than what her Mum says. Yes, "Mum" is her mother.


3

A 'broken nose' is a nose that has been injured in a fight or accident, so that one or more bones in the nose have been broken or cracked. If the bone damage is not repaired by medical attention, the nose usually has a bent or distorted appearance. Nasal fracture (patient information leaflet)


3

I'll break the passage up into two parts to address your two questions. I can’t be bothered to spend much time on her until she passes the five-year mark, … The narrator is using mark here to mean Noun. a figure registering a point or level reached or achieved — https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mark (sense 3h) So the “five-year mark” is a goal ...


3

If someone is unhappy, worried, or feeling unwell, they may appear subdued. They may not behave in a way that friends or relatives expect, for example, a happy, loud, and cheerful person may seem quiet. In this this situation people may say something like 'he is not himself today', 'not his usual self', or 'less than himself'. When the person recovers from ...


3

"It" is Charlie's career. To 'have anything to do with (something)' means 'to be involved or connected with (something)' It can be used to discuss a hypothetical or possible situation where someone is involved with something. In this case, the narrator ("I") is saying that if she were (hypothetically) Charlie's wife (instead of Hannah) ...


2

In this context the "though" is "although". The sentence suggests that brave young gods are not usually from the race or lineage of giants. Tyr was an exception.


2

Could is an auxiliary verb which was placed at the beginning. It changes the typical declarative order, it indicates a subject–auxiliary inversion is going to take place and the listener is prepared to parse it differently (as a question, perhaps, since it's the most frequent type of inversion in English). Could it be ... ? Could it be because ... ? Could ...


2

There are at least two ways - and the first one is almost conclusive. "Could it be..." is an inverted word order that indicates that a question is being asked (albeit sometimes a rhetorical question). If it were a simple statement, it would start "It could be". In a question, the word order is changed: "Could it be". In rare ...


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