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6

Generally, when people refer to their level in a certain language, the idiomatic technical word is fluent (or speak fluently). Smooth is used more to describe the manner of speech rather than to assess the level of language proficiency. As in smooth-talker: a person who gets another person to do their bidding by using a slick, gently persuasive, practised, ...


5

It means that they didn't find her where she was expected to be. There's a common metaphor in English that "the bird has flown", meaning the person you're looking for has disappeared or escaped. This is linked to that — the bird (Black Widow) has left her nest (the building they expected to find her in) so it's empty. There is also an idiomatic ...


3

Yes, the phrase in commas is a subordinate clause and can be removed from the main phrase without losing the meaning, so the answer to "who's lit?" is Dexter (as is answering "who's holding Billy?"). The meaning is that Dexter was lit from behind, so the light source is behind him (in the bathroom) and the metallic steam is a metaphor for ...


3

Josh Blue is a comedian who has cerebral palsy, which is a neurological disorder affecting muscle development and movement. It is relatively easy to tell that someone has cerebral palsy by looking at them. Wikipedia notes: Other symptoms include seizures and problems with thinking or reasoning, which each occur in about one-third of people with CP. So some ...


3

The adjectives "smoothly" and "fluently" might be interpreted differently in different contexts. For a native speaker, "fluently" might be understood to mean: "quickly, clearly, using complex and technical vocabulary precisely" Whereas "smoothly might mean in a gentle flowing intonation." For a learner "...


3

They are implying that the figures may be inaccurate or unsubstantiated. But also they are saying that they could be correct but they have no way of verifying them. So it's a way of distancing themselves from any later issue over the exact numbers.


3

First, it seems this text looks like it's trying to mimic real spoken conversation. Real spoken conversation between individuals that know each other sometimes has a tendency to elide or omit the words at the beginning of sentences (conversational deletion as @stangdon mentions in comments), especially words that identify the subject. The reason is both ...


2

Both are correct, and they have different meanings. "He won't be back for six months" means that he won't be back during the next six months. If he will be back at the end of the six months, you could say "he will be back in six months"; this does not contradict the earlier statement. "He won't be back in six months" means that ...


2

This is a special meaning of project: American Heritage Dictionary (Psychology) To attribute (one's own emotion or motive, for example) to someone else unconsciously in order to avoid anxiety or guilt. Merriam-Webster to attribute (one's own ideas, feelings, or characteristics) to other people or to objects The crimes don't have to be completely ...


2

We can use these infintive phrases in "if" or "when" clauses: If I am to play tennis, I want a new racket If we are to eat the fish, we should cook it first. These carry the sense of "If a decision is made that I play tennis", and implicitly, the decision hasn't yet been made and will depend on the conditions that are ...


2

Here, positive means certain. Please see Lexico positive ADJECTIVE 3 With no possibility of doubt; definite. The subject accidentally fell through the hole used by firemen to get to ground level quickly. Before he hit the concrete floor, though, he was able to grasp the pole that the firemen slide down, and break his fall.


2

The previous statement said that indifference is the one thing that can't be faked. So I interpret "But you are faking it" to mean "But you are faking indifference" (i.e., you're not actually indifferent, you're only trying to look like you are). "Rule" is not a verb here, it's a noun. It's like saying "That is the number ...


2

"wife of 49 years" refers to the amount of time she was his wife, not the amount of time she was alive: they had been married for 49 years when he died. Presumably she is much older than 49.


2

It is valid. You see the person. You see their screaming face. You hear the scream. You put two and two together to make four. You see the person scream. It is a completely normal way to express this idea. It would be odd to say "I saw a scream".


2

Is there a difference between 'speak fluently' and 'speak smoothly' in meaning? Wiktionary can shed some light on this: Fluent: In casual use, “fluency” refers to language proficiency broadly, while in narrow use it refers to using a language flowingly, rather than haltingly. Smooth: Glib (Artfully persuasive but insincere in nature; smooth-talking, ...


1

As JamesK says, this is perfectly reasonable. If you are in a crowded area, it may well be relevant to say that you saw who it was that screamed. To push things a little, you may not actually hear the scream, but still see the act occurring. To answer the other side of your question, if you want to emphasise the sound side of things, it would be perfectly ...


1

Do you think a user will run the program? If you think "yes, they will" then use "When". If you think it is possible but you are not sure, the use "if". When Jack comes home, I will give him this present. (I know Jack will come home) If Jack comes home, I will give him this present. (It is possible that Jack won't come home)...


1

"What you are about" is an informal expression that means "who you are". So this quote means, "I like knowing who I am".


1

Here, it is clear from context that Geralt is the one who is being torn from sleep. Specifically, Geralt is still in the process of waking up reluctantly as if removed forcibly from (torn out of) the sleeping state that Geralt was previously in (due to neck trauma). Despite some grammatical ambiguity, it is clearly not the case that Geralt feels torn about ...


1

The first part does mean that Uranus has a tilt of 97.77 degrees which is possibly the result of a collision with an Earth-sized object so the phrase starting possibly is a reduced relative clause. "Possibly" does mean "which is possibly".


1

The word is "audience" So then the game starts and the goon squad scores over a thousand points, because you get points for style and stuff, whatever. How does the scoring system work? No idea. It's just gonna be all over the place Err, it's gonna be hard for the audience to feel any stakes if the scoring is arbitrary. Actually, yup. Okay. I've ...


1

This is a straight use of the verb "take", though it is one of those verbs with dozens of meanings, so you have to go through quite a bit to find! Looking at Merriam Webster for example, they have: take (verb) ... to adopt, choose, or avail oneself of for use: such as ... e. (3) : need, require // takes a size nine shoe // it takes two to start ...


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