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34

"Plague" can have several different meanings depending on context: In its most technical form, "plague" is used to refer specifically to diseases caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis (e.g. "bubonic plague", "pneumonic plague", etc). This has historically also been known by names such as "the black death", etc. In this sense, COVID-19 is definitely not ...


18

First, a note on "biblical language." Feel free to skip ahead to the answer, below the horizontal rule. Let's be careful when we talk about "biblical language." The Tanakh (the Hebrew Bible) was originally written in Biblical Hebrew and Biblical Aramaic. The Christian New Testament was probably originally written in Koine Greek. These texts have been ...


15

A plague is a general term for an outbreak of a virulent disease. Or even more generally, any outbreak of something unpleasant. For centuries smallpox was one of the world's most-dreaded plagues, killing as many as 30 percent of its victims. A plague of flies descended on a Russian village after farmers used chickens droppings as fertiliser. The ...


12

Yes, you can use plague as a “general” term. It is also usable (as The plague) to refer to the particular disease as noted already. Without the the, it means anything that (a) afflicts, (b) besets and (c) in general is a nuisance i.e. irritating, persistent, and / or widespread. It's often found in compound terms, such as [place] was plagued with [pest] (...


4

This isn't really an issue of "Bible English" versus "modern English" or "religious language" versus "secular language", but simply that the word "may" has multiple definitions. You can find the same issue you're talking about in everyday writing today. The word "may" can be an expression of hopeful intent. Like, "May you find happiness in your marriage". ...


4

Not every disease is a plague, if that's what you were thinking. From Merriam Webster: Plague definition 2.a: an epidemic disease causing a high rate of mortality So according to Merriam Webster, the disease has to be an epidemic and it has to cause a high rate of mortality


3

To "exhaust", as used here, means to use up, to use all that is available. Like you might say, "Buying a new car exhausted all the money in my bank account." So the writer is saying that people have some knowledge of psychic phenomena, but this knowledge is limited and incomplete, so that understanding whatever magic these sisters did goes beyond our ...


3

It doesn't explicitly say that the donation has already been made, or indeed if the fine has been paid. Most fines issued by the police or courts in the UK have a deadline by which they must be paid, and some fines are even allowed to be paid in increments. And under Football Association (FA) rules, "all fines and charges are payable forthwith and must be ...


3

Her agent would have been the person who found venues for her lectures and organised the business arrangements.


3

English commonly uses "over" that way to speak of a visit, e.g., "I will come over later." "We'll come over to your house tomorrow." The word in that use is classed as an adverb. See American Heritage Dictionary: AHD "over" 3e c. To one's place of residence or business: invited us over for cocktails. The form "will be over" means the speaker will have ...


3

One of the meanings of 'over' is 'to another place'. When people are going from one place to another, they can call that 'going over' to the other place. If someone says 'come over' they mean 'come to my house or apartment, or my current location'. 'I'll be over right away' means 'I will be where you are very soon; I am leaving now'. One of the meanings of ...


3

People often say 'a phenomena', 'a criteria', 'a media', where purists would insist on phenomenon, criterion, and medium. However, 'a phenomena' has been found as early as 1576, although I would avoid it. I would definitely avoid 'a criteria'. I would not say 'stadia' as the plural of 'stadium', or 'fora' instead of 'forums'. Even pedantry has its limits. ...


3

It means what re + verb usually means - to do something again. He did not want to write his own version of existing legends ('tell them again'), but to invent his own new ones.


2

‘May’ is often used in religious language as a wishful benediction, but — as you have seen — not always. The usage of ‘may’ is more like an indicator of ‘I want this to happen’. So the sentences would become ‘I want God to bless you’ and ‘I want your children to always be healthy and happy’, and lastly ‘I want my wrath to blaze up against them to consume ...


2

To plot a route on a map is, in its most literal sense, to draw a line on it indicating the path you intend to travel; plot here is a verb in the same sense as plotting a graph. The phrase is also used metaphorically when nobody is actually drawing a line, or indeed has an actual map to draw on, but is deciding upon the course a planned journey of any sort, ...


2

No, it doesn't mean "unwittingly". That means "unaware". Preceded by "half", it means "only partially aware" or "not fully aware", or "having a limited understanding."


2

In 1859, when Conan Doyle was born, the term 'sensitive plate' was just starting to be used to describe a glass plate coated with light-sensitive chemicals. The term was still in use in 1888 when this edition of the Photographic News was published but, as this NGram graph shows, from then on the term was quite rapidly overtaken by 'photographic plate'. ...


2

The word ‘dash’ has several different meanings based on context. A dashed line is so called because it’s a line made up of dashes; of little straight strokes of the pen/pencil. ‘To dash’ can also be used as a synonym of ‘to run’, although it gives the impression of a much shorter distance — across the room, perhaps — and a lot more speed. Lastly, if an ...


2

That "away" means that the mountains are distant. American Heritage Dictionary "away" adj.2 Distant, as in space or time: The city is miles away. The game was still a week away. The word "away" often appears with another word, as in "miles away", "far away", "well away". Here it is used alone. They are to the west of the river, but "along the river" ...


2

Using "Not only" instead of "only" would give the sentence a very different meaning. If it were "Not only", it would mean that he got both a small practice bike AND a fucking Harley-Davidson. "Only" by itself is used to distinguish and highlight the contrast between the two characters - one got a small practice bike, and one got a fucking Harley. Here it ...


1

Pouring boiling tar off the ramparts of castles or city walls was an early thermal weapon used in medieval times. Also, "tarring and feathering" was a form of public torture and humiliation. Both involved heating tar to use in an offensive way. In your text, "heating the tar" seems to be used as a metaphor to describe people preparing for trouble. Calling ...


1

Do you know the game? If so you will know that "reverse" is one of the playable cards in the game. You also know that in UNO™ you play cards from your hand onto a pile in the middle of the game. This could be called "tossing" a card onto the pile. "Keep on rolling" is a vague slangy expression meaning "Keep going and having fun". It appears in some rock ...


1

In context, it does not necessarily mean that the book was written poorly. What it certainly means is that the substance written about is not "refined," meaning neither sufficiently genteel nor sufficiently intellectual. In addition, it may, and probably does, mean that the book itself is not well written, but that cannot be determined definitively by this ...


1

Yes, it can be used that way, but it goes a bit deeper than that. It’s more if someone begins saying something ridiculous or with strange implications, or that shouldn’t be said in the current social climate, you might ask ‘do you know what you’re saying?’ — or alternatively ‘do you realise what you’re saying?’ — and then spell out to them why it’s ...


1

This is really ambiguous because, as folks have mentioned, it's actually very badly written. "next" here could refer to "space phenomena", or it could refer to "pieces of stardust" or it could refer to "celestial bodies". It's also unclear what "others" in the next sentence is supposed to refer to. Based on the context you provided, my guess is that, most ...


1

This Beach’s beauty: SUBJECT is: AUXILIARY VERB


1

This is used in the sense of definition 5a from the Merriam-Webster Dictionary entry: 5 a : a period or step in a process, activity, or development In particular, it is common to talk about a game having multiple "stages", which are distinct parts of the game (or story, etc) you must proceed through in order.


1

The fact that 'Hermanns' is capitalised tells you that it is a proper noun (a name). 'All the Herrmans that ever breathed (lived)' means 'Herrman, and all of the people like him or her (in some relevant way) that have ever lived'. Herrman would be someone that the writer expects the reader to have heard of. 'All the Lady Gagas' would be understood to mean '...


1

I agree that "astound" isn't used for the physical sense. I think "stun", in the figurative sense of a psychological reaction, is actually stronger than "astound". The word "astound" connotes very strong surprise, while "stun" in the figurative sense suggests a reaction similar to the effect of a physical blow, such as momentary paralysis.


1

Here is another sense of "through": Merriam-Webster "through" 3b preposition 3b —used as a function word to indicate movement within a large expanse flew through the air In any case, the speaker may not have expressed the idea very well. They might as well have said "This is a curve in a plane." I agree that space doesn't have beginning or end.


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