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0

It seems like a bit of a mixed metaphor. Presumably the speaker is thinking of the Biblical expression 'gird up one's loins' (to hitch up the skirts of the robe ready for action). I found this illustration


1

"Gird" literally means to put a protective belt around something. In a figurative sense, it means to protect, or save / preserve something. Evidently, the character in the book wants to "save" their fury, which they do by writing down every wrong that is done against them.


1

A "luxury" is "a pleasure obtained only rarely". The characters are using "luxury" rather ironically here. A wartime pilot is very busy and lives a very dangerous life. They could be killed almost any time. A wartime pilot does not have time to worry about "do I have the confidence of my peers". From the point of view of a wartime pilot, having enough ...


0

luxury is not a collective noun. In this context, a luxury is something that you would like, but cannot afford. You use this expression when you are not able to do something. If, for example, you have a backlog of work and a colleague invites you to join her for lunch, you would say: I wish I had the luxury of being able to take a lunch break. You don't ...


1

It's in the dictionary: woodsy /ˈwʊdzi/ adjective: woodsy; comparative adjective: woodsier; superlative adjective: woodsiest relating to or characteristic of wood or woodland. It seems a common AmEng thing to make an adjective more friendly or diminutive by adding -sy to the end of it, for example "cutesy". You could just say something is cute, or ...


0

'I knew my concentration was bad' is the correct one. you'd use 'have' if you were using a different tense, like 'I have always known that my concentration was bad'


-1

You are correct. The phrase "woodsy home" here resembles a home made of wood. Woodsy is an adjective that defines a characteristic of wood. READ HERE FOR MORE https://www.dictionary.com/browse/woodsy


1

This means that the handle had indentations for the fingers to create a tighter grip. The handles of utility knives and hunting knives (like buck knives) often have finger grooves.


1

I feel “from” conveys the origin or cause of the illness and “with” conveys the actual illness. I would say “I have a virus” and “I’m “sick with a virus“ rather than “I’m sick from a virus.” I‘m sore from working out. (Cause/origin of problem) I’m sore with working out. (Test shows it doesn’t work)


0

1a and 1b are basically interchangeable (they can switch places without it changing the meaning or effect, they do the same job) 2a and 2b are different tenses. "Were" makes it past tense, as in "last week the activities were largely centered around the family" and "this week lets do activities largely centered around the family"


0

"lead in" almost always comes before "the direction of" and it implies a future-tense state, as in " This road will lead in the direction of- Note: the proper past tense version of "Lead" is "Led" "Led to" implies a consequence of action, such as "Robbing that bank led to my time in prison" "Lead To" can't really be used properly in a sentence, ...


0

I wasn’t accepted to college due to my failing English. It's ambiguous. "My failing English" could be a clause functioning as complement of "to", or less likely it could be a noun phrase with the verb "failing" modifying "English". Both alternants function as reason adjuncts, though with different meanings. As a clause it means that you weren't accepted ...


0

As written it is ambiguous. As an adjective "failing" means "getting worse" I didn't get a driving licence due to my failing eyesight. In that sentence it is certain that we mean that he is going blind, and "failing" is an adjective On the other hand a gerund phrase, with the subject in the possessive form is also possible I didn't get a driving ...


0

It is probably a gerund, but it depends on context. It is applicable in both senses — ‘his failing of an English exam’ or ‘his English getting worse’ — but if you used it as an adjective, it would imply that he used to have very good English, but now it has gotten much worse. However, the fact that he’s applying for college makes this usage unlikely; it’s ...


0

You aren't mistaken! The sentence's wording is just a bit ambiguous. A more straightforward rephrasing of the sentence would be: The city council is to the mayor as Congress is to the President. P.S. I see that this question has already been answered on EL&U, but I thought it wouldn't hurt to have it answered here too. Cheers!


2

"...where others have failed..." is an adverb phrase that has almost the same sense as "...though others have failed...", but it implies that the effort was the same for all countries. Specifically, it says "South Korea has succeeded in the effort to control coronavirus, and other countries have not succeeded at the same task".


0

I love you a lottle, it’s like a little but a lot. "Lottle" is not in the dictionary. It is a made-up word. But you shouldn't really have to ask what it means, because the sentence is self-explanatory: it’s like a little but a lot "Lottle" is apparently a compound word (sometimes also known as a portmanteau) of the words 'little' and 'lot'. These two ...


0

She's just like a guy I know. Not only did he get a small practice bike, he bought a fucking Harley-Davidson, despite having never rode a bike. This means he bought a small practice bike (which the author thinks was a bad idea) and he also bought a Harley-Davidson (which the author thinks is an even worse idea). She's just like a guy I know. Only, he ...


5

This is a specific structure to compare two things. A is to B as C is to D. An example is: Green is to go as red is to stop. In the context of traffic lights, green means go and red means stop. The City Council is to Congress as the Mayor is to the President. So in the context of politics, the local government City Council has the same ...


8

The City Council has the same kind of relationship to the Mayor as the US Congress has to the President.


2

The measure of things being able to ‘do’ actions grammatically correctly isn’t actually whether they’re living or not; it’s whether they have agency — whether they are capable of doing things and making decisions. A ‘fund’ is when a group of people pool their money together to do something. In this case, they’ve pooled their money together to buy stocks. A ...


1

The sentence you've given doesn't really make sense. Your understanding is somehow correct. It means 'keep the question about exceptions in your mind and we're going to focus on these ones (hold it for a later time -- we will explain it later)'. Furthermore, it's poorly punctuated. The 3-4 sentences are written as if they were 1 sentence.


1

The phrase was used as sarcasm, to imply that the person it was directed at could be compared to a defenseless child who was victimized by a "data management expert" who molested him. Presumably, the writer thinks that the reader is acting like a baby, and should take responsibility for themselves and stop complaining. I guess it's clever, but it seems ...


1

I suppose ‘sick from’ has more of an implication that it’s badly affecting the person who has contracted it; it says that the person has gotten sick from it; they’ve contracted the disease and therefore become affected by it; they’re sick — meaning ‘feeling bad’ — from coronavirus. This gives a bit of an implication that they’ve been badly affected by the ...


0

I think there is a complication here because both "tripped on" and "tripped over" can have multiple meanings: "tripped on" can mean either that the mentioned thing was the thing that caused one to trip, or it can just mean that one was "on" (on top of, or at the same location as) the thing when one tripped, so "tripped on a cable" probably means that the ...


1

Google's definition is "block or become blocked with an accumulation of thick matter." It is almost always a bad thing to happen. When skin pores become blocked, then spots and pimples can develop. This just says "it won't clog your pores". Moisturiser is not meant to cover your pores. It is not makeup. Makeup can clog your pores, which is why you ...


2

The "genie" is a metaphor for the Tennis competition at Wimbledon. In "let loose" means the same as "set free". In Aladdin, the Genie is let loose from the lamp, and then performs magic tasks. In England, Wimbledon is like a genie that is let loose and makes people feel good every summer. The metaphor is extended in the next paragraph "Wimbledon uncorked ...


-2

Let loose means to relax and have fun. Usually after a period of time spent working or being serious. I believe in that context: every year during summer time, the genie relaxes and has fun. The genie can hear crickets while relaxing during the summer.


2

The truth is that there really is not much difference between "will" and "is going to" in modern English. They basically mean the same thing to most people. Various grammarians like to talk about subtle differences in meaning or intent between the two, but those are usually lost on anyone who hasn't spent a lot of time studying language, etc, so it's not a ...


1

From Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014, a relevant definition of lot is: any object, such as a straw or slip of paper, drawn from others at random to make a selection or choice (esp in the phrase draw or cast lots) An excerpt from https://carm.org/what-casting-lots-in-the-bible: Casting lots was a method ...


0

“She is planning on being in London next week, but her plans may change.” Or “She will be in London next week.” “Next week she is going to be in London” also works, you got that one right. The others are incorrect; instead of “she has an idea to be in London” you might say instead; “she is thinking of going to London”.


2

It's the hand of the body: if it meant the surgeon's own hand it would say raised his left hand. "No wedding ring" - the woman was not married. (I haven't read the book in years, but I presume this was Oliver's mother dying in childbirth). "The old story" - a story we keep on hearing, i.e. something that isn't supposed to happen, but keeps on happening (...


1

He's pointing at the Lacrimal gland (moving the cursor around the Lacrimal gland). He said 'the Lacrimal gland over here'. Over here means near you or in the country you're in. - Collins English dictionary In simple words, 'over here' means within your (speaker) reach, close enough to be touched or picked up by someone.


0

We're into the realms of metaphor and slang here, so don't expect things to be precise or logical. At its most literal, "within reach" means "within the area you could get to by reaching out with your arms". We also use "reach" slightly less precisely to mean "get to", and "within reach" to mean "fairly easy/quick to get to"; so "the house is within reach ...


1

Area doesn't mean "city block" If you are on Independence Ave and I am on C St SW, then the area around a line drawn between us (in some very vague an not specially defined way) is the intervening area. There is an area between the National Museum of Native American History and the Mary E Switzer Building. That "intervening area" would include the Voice ...


1

"Start" has transitive and intransitive senses. Merriam-Webster "start" "Start out" is an intransitive phrasal verb: Merriam-Webster "start out" Given that one of your expressions is transitive, and one is not, they mean different things and are not interchangeable.


1

I have never heard it used, but I assume it is gambling slang. If I had to guess what it meant, it might be similar to ‘butt up against’, meaning — in a relational rather than physical context — to come uncomfortably close to someone else when you’re both working to opposite ends. It may also just be gambling slang for playing with someone. However, ...


1

You may well ask is best treated as an idiom. Normally may well means something like it is very likely that, eg I may well go to the post office on my way home. means more than just that I may go, but I think it is likely that I will go. But You may well ask has a range of special meanings. At the least, it means "I thought you would ask that". But ...


1

The usual usage of "you may well ask" is like this, said by one speaker: " 'What's all the noise', you may well ask." This is the speaker expressing that they think that another person may have noticed all the noise, and they expect a question about it. As an exchange, as you have quoted it, it would mean that someone has noticed the noise and is asking ...


1

"At least initially" expresses the idea that your statement about something is, or was, only true in the beginning. It is similar to the phrase, "At first". "Most diets work, at least initially." This means that when you start a diet, you will probably lose some weight. However, over time, you may be less successful. "At least initially, he was nice to me."...


1

Slump and slouch are synonyms both meaning to sit or stand lazily but stoop means to completely bend as if you are picking something up from the ground.


0

I think both can be used interchangeably. If one was to be really super pedantic, and want a way to split them, you could say that using "tripped on" places the blame directly on that object (eg: cable, step), whereas tripped over could be more ambiguous as to what caused the trip - "I tripped over the rug" could be interpreted as I tripped (on some ...


1

The “only” in this sentence can mean “but”. It’s trying to explain how she’s like the guy, but with one difference. Only can be replaced with “but” when there is just one thing that is being talked about.


2

Using "Not only" instead of "only" would give the sentence a very different meaning. If it were "Not only", it would mean that he got both a small practice bike AND a fucking Harley-Davidson. "Only" by itself is used to distinguish and highlight the contrast between the two characters - one got a small practice bike, and one got a fucking Harley. Here it ...


1

Those two sentences are saying different things. Not only did he get a small practice bike... Means he did get a small practice bike... [and something else about that]. Only, he didn't get a small practice bike He bought a fucking Harley-Davidson, despite having never rode a bike. Means he didn't buy a small practice bike, he bought a Harley ...


0

To prove something means to show it is true but can also mean “found to be” Adding ing to a word means you are doing that thing at the moment. So proving would mean you are currently in the act of showing truth.


1

"Proved" or "proven" in these contexts means "turned out to be". There is an initial unknown situation (how would the runners fare in the heat? How would the new treatment go?), and as the situation is played out, the result becomes clear - the result is proven, like a scientific experiment. That is what the "end up" refers to - at the end of the situation,...


3

It means what re + verb usually means - to do something again. He did not want to write his own version of existing legends ('tell them again'), but to invent his own new ones.


1

He's saying that you should take the evidence the author is mentioning into consideration. Basically, he's attesting a story that seems unbelievable, but he's saying that he's got a significant amount of evidence to back up that the story actually happened, and that Mr. Rip van Winkle was a very reliable source. As a result, a reader should consider these ...


3

People often say 'a phenomena', 'a criteria', 'a media', where purists would insist on phenomenon, criterion, and medium. However, 'a phenomena' has been found as early as 1576, although I would avoid it. I would definitely avoid 'a criteria'. I would not say 'stadia' as the plural of 'stadium', or 'fora' instead of 'forums'. Even pedantry has its limits. ...


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