New answers tagged

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As user105719 notes, the phrase has arisen due to people failing to understand, or looking for an excuse for their wilfully ignoring, an example. The phrase you have quoted could be re-written as: Responsibilities (for example, effective operation of FLT equipment and palletisers) which means effectively the same thing. However, by re-writing it as '... ...


1

I would say they mean exactly the same. I find the second much clearer, because it is easier to parse.


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From your comment, you have trouble understanding 'cross-referenced' as it modifies 'journals'. A journal that's cross-referenced is one where entries in the journal reference each other. Consider an encyclopedia - the article for 'volcano' probably references the articles for 'mountain', 'earthquake', 'lava', and 'plate tectonics', among other ...


0

It is hard to advise you on how to combine mime and speech. If you are showing him the orange why not also make the sign for 'small' with your fingers? Then you don't even need to speak! "I need small size of this" and "I need this in small size" are both grammatically incorrect. British English doesn't use 'need' as often as American English does. So in ...


0

In simple words: journals those are very carefully maintained and verified from different resources.


1

Differentiate and distinguish share one synonymous meaning, but each word has other meanings that aren't synonymous. For example, it's possible to use differentiate intransitively (example from Google) without a between structure: the receptors are developed and differentiated into sense organs but you can't substitute distinguish here. Also, using ...


0

John was in a car accident yesterday, and he is now in jail. I may or may not know John. This is a simple statement. John was in a car accident yesterday, and he is now sitting in jail. This somewhat implies the person saying this has the power to bail him out of jail, but is choosing not to do so to teach John a lesson.


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Until is both a preposition and conjunction. And 'til X is OK if X is a noun or noun phrase. It's common in speech to omit the un- part of until when speaking quickly or informally. This is most correctly spelled in writing as 'til, or til which prevents confusion with till (meaning a garden tool or part of a cash register). It's not common in educated ...


2

There's not much difference. The first has a simple literal meaning. The second says that he is "sitting" so we suppose that he is not doing much. He isn't standing at the bars protesting his innocence or being interviewed by the police. He isn't meeting his lawyer to plan his defence. He is just sitting there. It isn't a particularly common phrase. There ...


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Both 1 & 4 are grammatically correct. However, they are not specific to the aperture, so the answer you're likely to get to those questions is the overall diameter of the human eye. To ask those questions clearly you would need to add to them. 1) What diameter is the the aperture of the human eye? 4) What is the diameter of the aperture of the human ...


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For me, option 4 is fine, though I'd probably be more specific, in alignment with the answer: What is the aperture diameter of the human eye?


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Of the four answers offered, the best one is: "1) What diameter Is the human eye ?" I would suggest a couple of change to that though, to replace the upper-case 'I', and to remove the space prior to the question mark. That would make it: "1) What diameter is the human eye?" I would also note that, the question and answer may not match, in that human ...


0

The answer above is good, but perhaps it is the poetic and slightly archaic phrasing that is confusing you? A more simple and direct way of saying it would be: "If a chain has even one link that is rusty, it can not be called strong".


1

To poison a well means to render it permanently (or for a very long time) unusable. So to use it an idiom in the example you give, it means "you must decide if the situation has been damaged or compromised beyond repair".


0

As usual with question of this sort, the answer is 100% to do with the (unpredictable) properties of the particular word that governs the clause. It happens that unaccusative verb prove (meaning turn out, be found to be) takes: an adjectival complement, eg The mold on the plants proved benign. a to-infinitve clause, eg The mold on the plants proved to ...


1

I hope that London will protect its citizens in bad times. I think this is what you are trying to say


1

Are you actually asking about this phrase, or about this phrase in context of the poem? This is a very simple phrase. You just need to think about it. You have a brand new steel chain everything is very shiny and strong, it is really hard to break. Now you imagine the same chain with a single rusty link, how hard is it to break the chain now? very simple ...


1

Shielding can be applied either to what is protected from some influence or to the source of that influence (if not to both). Example 1 is about protecting A (by shielding it) from something else. Example 2 is about isolating A (by shielding it as a source of an undesirable influence) from everything else (which is thus protected).


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“The shielding of A” most commonly means protecting A from something (that is, your option 2). For example, “The shielding of your barbecue from the weather with a fabric cover, roofing, etc. will prolong its useful life.” However, you have also identified how constructions like, “the shielding of weather from your barbecue” are possible. As a learner, I ...


1

Your use of the word “defer” is good, but there are multiple errors in all three sentences. These include: The use of the preposition “in” is incorrect in the phrases: “an option in the firm A“ and “without interest in the firm A”. Both fail to indicate that the firm is offering an option of no interest and instead the wording suggests that options and ...


-1

It should read There is an interest-free deferred payment option which allows the customer to pay 30 days after purchase.


0

call someone out is a phrasal verb which means to call in different contexts as mentioned below: call someone out summon someone to deal with an emergency or to do repairs. "patients are to be told to stop calling doctors out unnecessarily at night" order or advise workers to strike. (also call someone out on something, call someone on ...


0

I would read this to mean that the real 'nett' return is 9.9% In business we talk of gross profit and nett profit. Nett profit is that which remains after the deduction of all operating costs.


2

It is implied that Oscar Niemeyer is speaking to a journalist. "That" is used to refer to objects that are not close to the speaker. It just means that the box is either close to the journalist, or at least not close to the Oscar Niemeyer. The word "that" makes no reference to the number of cigars. If you say "I need that box of sugar" there must be a box,...


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"Pretentious" adjective adjective: pretentious attempting to impress by affecting greater importance, talent, culture, etc., than is actually possessed.


1

The quotation is from History of Spiritualism by Arthur Conan Doyle, vol 1, page 28, where he is writing about Edward Irving. (Text at archive.org) A few sentences before your quotation, Doyle says: Here, in Gray's Inn Road, Irving rallied the faithful. It cannot be denied that the Church, as he organized it, with its angel, its elders, its ...


-4

The word "innocent" means "An innocent person is someone who is not involved with any military group or war", or the second meaning is "having no knowledge of the unpleasant and evil things in life:, or "not intended to harm anyone". Resource from Cambridge dictionary


24

You should check more dictionaries. I have heard of Longman's dictionary, but it certainly isn't the top choice. For British English, always check Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries. I believe Google uses Oxford as default. For American English, check Websters. Oxford has the following as a primary definition for "innocent": without; lacking. "a street ...


20

You are correct, it means "entirely lacking" but carries a slight sense of humour: if it was logical it would be "guilty of making sense". OED gives innocent of as "Free from; devoid of" with a humourous sense. The earliest recorded use in 1706 is very similar to your quotation: The Opera .. Enrich'd with songs, but innocent of thought (J. Addison ...


4

If you'll forgive a pedantic response, the lesson here is that poetry (including the lyrics to songs) is elliptical, metaphoric, and allowed to violate the rules of standard English to conform to both the meter (or rhythm, if you prefer) and the imagination of the poet or lyricist. The interpretation of the associated meanings will thus be highly subjective. ...


0

Those are conditional sentences. The first one is not correct. It’s the second conditional sentence kind, which means that the use of ‘wish’ and a simple past verb expresses a desire that could come true in the future. The second sentence is the third conditional sentence kind, it’s constructed using ‘wish’+ ‘had’/‘had not’ + past participle verb, and ...


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For describes wishes about the past we usually use past perfect tense: I wish I had brought my wallet. And, when we need to talk about two past situations mutually related and clarify their chronology, we should use present perfect + past perfect: They had called before it has happened. However, your sentence don't actually treat about witch situation ...


1

Better to say "brings together"


0

I don't like the sound of either. I would say: There is 4500g of product in stock. The noun "product" can be countable or uncountable - in other words, you can use it in singular form to describe all your different types of product.


0

Yes, it can mean unintentionally, but it can also mean “suddenly” or “abruptly” without being completely unintentional. It’s not always really “bad, offensive, embarrassing” either. For example, I wanted to tell my best friend Sharon her new haircut didn’t really suit her but I was waiting for the right time to raise the subject sensitively. In the end ...


1

It means found or discovered. I would have preferred 'come across' in this context.


0

Don't use "like" in these sentences. It is a bad slang word that is used far too often and is not grammatically correct.


0

No, you can't use like in that way in correct English. If you mean 'something like this' you could say "There is no rule in life such as 'Everyone must be rich'". "It means something like…"


4

Chase down is a phrasal verb meaning: to follow and catch (someone or something): Police chased down the robber in an alley. to search for and find (someone or something): I finally chased down that recipe I promised you. I chased him down at his old hangout. Whereas, Chase is a word which could be used in different ways. As a verb: ...


1

There is a special problem of past time-reference in English. They name it sometimes as the problem of choosing when you should use the Present Perfect tense and when the Past Indefinite tense. The discussions have been going on for a long time in the scientific and scientific-popular grammar literature similar to this site. Typically, such discussions are ...


1

It appears that by this they mean the person eventually becomes uncontactable, i.e., unable to be contacted or communicated with. It's not clear (from the paragraph or that expression alone) to what extent such a person is unaware of their surroundings. Another word for a person in this state is incommunicado, although it can be used in other contexts as ...


0

To "be without" is to lack something. It has the same meaning as "not have". It is usually used about things that you would want. Peter is without his usual tennis partner, as she is sick. (Peter wants to have his usual partner, but she isn't available.) Present perfect has the usual meaning of "starting in the past and continuing until now". It is not ...


-1

"It does not lie in your mouth to say..." means "lt would be hypocritical or inconsistent for you to say..."


1

As long as, as short as, as many as, and the like can be used in front of a number to emphasize how big or small the number is. Here's what Practical English Usage says about this construction: (379.3) Before a number, as long as can be used to suggest great length. These meetings can last as long as four hours. (203.6) As ...


1

"Boot cop buddy movie with some stupid animal sidekick" This is trying to define a very specific genre of movies. Commonly-referenced movie genres tend to be quite broad - for example Romance, Comedy, Horror, or Action. There are also many sub-genres which require further definition, like Romantic-Comedy which contain elements from two different genres. Yet,...


1

When a sentence ends with a comma and 'is he?', 'is she?', 'are they?', 'is it?', or any variant thereof, it is an idiom meaning that the speaker believes the subject of the sentence is described by the first part of the sentence. In this case, the speaker is guessing that the young woman is a 'home help', or maid.


0

They add value as a systems integrator. There is as is a preposition and it is used to refer to the function or character that someone or something has. So therefore you can say: They add value in the role of a systems integrator.


1

"Most recently" doesn't sound quite right here; it's a little too formal. You wouldn't use "the" before "last". So: When did you eat in this restaurant last? Though, for me, it would be more idiomatic to say: When did you last eat in this restaurant? And going a little further, as the listener is likely to know which restaurant you mean by "this ...


0

“When did you last eat” is fine. But it is unnatural to with qualifiers like “in this restaurant”. I am not sure there is a good rule for you here, sadly.


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