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1 vote

what does "as in" mean, how do I use it correctly?

We can use “as in” when we want to clarify the meaning of something. It’s a way to further the understanding of the reader in a context, and it’s a useful tool to have ready. This article will ...
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3 votes

doesn't know if one of his neighbors

"someone" implies any individual person "a neighbor" implies a person that lives nearby "one of his neighbors" implies a person from the group of nearby people. In none ...
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3 votes

doesn't know if one of his neighbors

Clearly, option a does not limit the class of possible entrants. Options b and c limit the class of possible entrants to neighbors without any indication of a specific neighbor. I do not see that “one ...
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1 vote

Meaning of 'with' in context

It is a strange use of with. Perhaps if you gave some context it would be less strange. Having said that, the meaning is clear: his sitting down was accompanied by his giving the order.
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1 vote

Is the contraction of How'd ( did or would ) (?)

Either one, depending on context. Both "how did" and "how would" contract to "how'd". "How'd you do that?" - How did you do that? "How'd you feel if I left?...
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1 vote

Is the phrase "the Italian for healthy taste" correct grammatically?

It's a rather confusing label at first glance. It should be read: Gusto Sano - the Italian [phrase] for "healthy taste" In English it's common to say "X is [language] for Y", as in ...
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0 votes

Difference between "do good to" "do good for" and "do good by"

Giving food to the hungry is doing good to someone and giving money to a charitable institution with the hope that your money will be of some help to the hungry is doing good for the hungry and giving ...
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4 votes
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meaning of "warbled out these metres meet"

You need to keep in mind the biblical idea that God created man from dust. So "a clod of clay" is one person. And "a pebble" is another person. So these are two people making ...
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1 vote

What's the meaning of ‘pull through‘ in this sentence?

The meaning is that the products have services attached to them. If you buy a car then you must buy fuel and you have to get maintenance such as oil change and so on. If you buy a gas furnace to heat ...
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4 votes

How come Mush Mouth gets shotgun? - Meaning

From comments to this question as originally posted on ELU, but left behind when it was migrated here to ELL... (Me) The first few lines of the transcript include "I can't feel my face, Charlie.&...
8 votes

Is the phrase "the Italian for healthy taste" correct grammatically?

I found references online to a brand Gusto Sano, which is, literally, the Italian expression for 'healthy taste'. Presumably you are puzzled by the [language] for something, a perfectly normal way of ...
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0 votes
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"What makes them different?" vs "What is it that makes them different?" Is there any difference between the two questions?

Firstly, if you want to know about the difference between the two, I suggest adding 'from each other', as the way you phrased it could also mean 'what sets these things apart from other things?' As ...
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0 votes

What does "plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions" mean?

for the intimate revelations of young men, That is when young men talk about their sex life or at least the terms in which they express them That is the words that they use to talk about sex are ...
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1 vote

What does "plagiaristic and marred by obvious suppressions" mean?

The terms used to express intimate “revelations” are “plagiaristic”, in that they are simply repeated terms and not true revelations. “Marred by obvious suppressions” means they are not truly ...
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"I have had people do such a thing." vs "Some people do such a thing." Any difference?

The structure [ "have" + object + base verb ] has more than one function. The most common one is causitive, but this is a different function. The function here is to indicate experiences ...
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1 vote

"I have had people do such a thing." vs "Some people do such a thing." Any difference?

The use of "have" here isn't causative. Consider the following sentences: I have ten patients. I have my patients exercise. The first indicates a sense of ownership, while the second ...
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0 votes

How do you ask something which is not exactly "half a glass"?

Simply use any word for a small amount, and make it relative to the half-full mark. For example, you could ask for the glass to be filled just shy of half full a tad more than half full
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2 votes

didn't know that one of my friends was

Is it possible that I had other friends who were policemen but she knew about them? It's possible, yes - but it's unlikely. The sentence: She didn't know that one of my friends was a policeman. is ...
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0 votes

"Can you see it?" vs "Do you see it?"

If see is used in the literal sense of perceiving light via the retina, then: Can tends to express the speaker's concern surrounding optical conditions, acuteness of sight of the interlocutor, the ...
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1 vote

What does this phrase: "The vestal vamp" means in this context?

This is an oxymoron a combination of two words of opposite meaning. Used rhetorically to reveal a paradox. Vestal refers to the Vestal Virgins of Rome, who were chaste and pure beyond suspicion. And ...
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2 votes
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Meaning of sentence in Declaration of Independence

I think that you're basically understanding it correctly. Because legislative powers are "incapable of annihilation", the king's dissolution of legislatures doesn't actually eliminate such ...
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0 votes

meaning of divine in the context

It's another way of saying superior to, however you want to understand it. Whether humans are created in God's image is a matter of religious belief, not of English grammar.
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2 votes

Whose purpose is it in this 'in order to' clause?

Sentence (1) makes no mention of whether they accepted the invitation. Sentence (2) is better, although the actual reason may not be. It might not have been for the convenience of the brothers, but ...
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4 votes
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Whose purpose is it in this 'in order to' clause?

The sentence states that the invitation was for that purpose, so it's (2). Otherwise it would be 'they accepted the King's invitation in order to...'
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1 vote

What does this mean or what this is mean?

Questions like the one you are asking about are constructed with a form of "to do" as an auxilliary verb, not with a form of "to be". Let's look at a declarative sentence first: ...
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2 votes
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What's the difference between “ terror attack” and " terrorist attack"

There is perhaps a slight difference. It's implied that a terrorist commits a terrorist attack. The classic definition of a terrorist is someone who is motivated by ideological beliefs, and often part ...
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1 vote
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on a level so far as nearness to truth is concerned

The apparent meaning - 'different outlooks are not equally near truth' - seems clear enough, but the use of 'on a level' (Lexico - MW) to mean on a par with: Equal in importance or quality to is ...
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3 votes

Need help to understand the irony in the paragraphs

I would say the irony is that the composers must (according to the author) focus to create music that the players will not focus on too much, because it would be distracting from the game if the ...
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1 vote

The pattern with main-stressed "it is" at the end as in "I'd like a burger please. - Ok, a burger it is."

This is an OSV (object, subject, verb) sentence created with object fronting: That car we bought at least five years ago. The other one we only bought last year. (By fronting the objects (that car ...
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1 vote

The pattern with main-stressed "it is" at the end as in "I'd like a burger please. - Ok, a burger it is."

This is an example of "fronting" a predicate nominative.1 Normally the sentences would be: It is a burger. It is 90%. Elements may be fronted for emphasis, for variety, for clarity, etc. ...
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1 vote

Meaning of "he had a sense of her being very light, as if even the light puffs of breeze blowing this morning might send her sailing away"

The narrator is really just saying that the mother looked like she was very light (the light that means the opposite of heavy), but is using a metaphor within a metaphor to say it. The first metaphor ...
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2 votes
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What does "go on" mean in: “I know you go on”?

The meaning of "go on" here is "continue", specifically in the context of Jack and Rose, "continue to live". This usage is not natural at all to use "go on" to ...
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1 vote
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What does "all that seem" mean exactly?

The last two lines form one sentence which could be simplified to Is all that we see a dream? which the author has expanded as you see, with an unusual use of 'seem', perhaps to invoke more thoughts ...
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1 vote

How to interpret the preposition "from" in "risks from flooding" — what changes?

You will come across two phrases in this context, the risk(s) of flooding and the risks (arising) from flooding. The risk(s) of flooding refers to the probability that flooding will occur, whether as ...
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1 vote
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meaning of redemption in the movie "Shawshank Redemption"

There is a religious sense: to be saved from a state of sin. Wikipdia explains: In Christian theology, redemption (Greek: apolutrosis) refers to the deliverance of Christians from sin. It assumes an ...
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1 vote

The meaning of "as it is written in the book"

The character is quoting "The Eve of St Agnes" by John Keats, as the story mentions earlier. This is the book. The problem is that when he reads it aloud, he misspeaks. Keats's original text ...
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0 votes

meaning of redemption in the movie "Shawshank Redemption"

I suppose it is used in this meaning: 'The action of redeeming.' (Colour Oxford English Dictionary) In the movie, the main character redeemed his dignity, proved his innocence.
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Which meanings of the words "excitation" and ''match'' fit in this context?

The meaning of "excite" is sense 5 "produce a state of increased energy". The large oscillations are an excited state of the system with increased energy. In a simple mechanical ...
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The use of "such"

Let's start by rewriting the sentence in question into a more standard order without the interjection: The number of particles needed to make up a human being is of such an order that huge numbers of ...
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3 votes
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"it seems that" vs "it seems as if"

For all intents and purposes, there is no difference in meaning. To me, the first of the three conveys more likelihood that he actually does know the answer, but it's very subtle.
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1 vote
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Why did we use participle here to describe action

The subject is "A student disrespecting his teacher". The meaning of this participle construction and so the meaning is pragmatically understood. If you consider the headword to be "...
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0 votes

Using “can I do” when ordering food at the restaurant!

In the UK, common phrases are "Do me a..." ("Please bring me a...") and "I could (really) do with..." ("I would really like to have..."). The latter phrase is ...
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the meaning of "go as so far to"?

Yes, it means the protagonist had enough with Garp's abusing of Luffy, and went as far as to call him names. According to Dictionary.com - go so far as to: Proceed to the point of doing something I ...
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5 votes

Is "wait" an exclamation in this context?

Grammatically, this is an intransitive verb in the imperative mood, like “Stop!” or “Listen!” However, it is used more like an interjection. We could also say, “Wait, you forgot your keys!” similar ...
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3 votes
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what does the proverb "A woman is only a woman, but a good cigar is a smoke" mean?

It isn't a proverb - it's a line from a Rudyard Kipling poem 'The Betrothed', so it has to be considered in context. At face value, it would suggest that you can get some enjoyment out of a cigar - ...
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4 votes

Is "wait" an exclamation in this context?

It could also be considered an interjection, specifically a Volitive interjection. According to Webster, Definition of interjection 1: an ejaculatory utterance usually lacking grammatical connection: ...
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3 votes

our readers thought that

I don't see any particular difference in meaning, just a stylistic choice. Readers is just a conventional way of saying 'people who had read the article'.
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1 vote
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Part this place = leave this place?

No, you can't speak of parting a place. You part from another person, or two people part when they leave one another's company. This is standard, current English but, as your dictionary says, the ...
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11 votes
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Is "wait" an exclamation in this context?

No it is not an exclamation but an order. According to EL&U - forming valid one word sentences: Interrogatives (who?), imperatives (stop), declaratives (me), locatives (here), and nominatives (...
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0 votes

sting = disadvantage?

"A sting" is something that hurts, like a bee-sting, or getting lemon juice in a cut. It isn't terrible pain, but it is different from an ache. So this "arithmetic" (ie the ...
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