New answers tagged

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The sentence is ungrammatical, because the fragment starting with "implementation ..." is a noun phrase with no corresponding verb. Most likely, the author meant: We are endeavoring to better understand the barriers to safe work environments and to implement a safety program on film productions. This is parallelism and is equivalent to the following two ...


1

Being "down in the dumps" means to be "In a gloomy or depressed mood". (Source) For example: "She's been down in the dumps ever since she lost the match."


0

Plato was a Greek philosopher who had some interesting ideas about quite a lot of things. The only one that is regularly attributed to him in everyday speech is, as you mentioned, the idea of platonic love. He also proposed the idea of platonic forms, where any particular thing can be defined by its essence- the set of properties that any thing of its kind ...


2

A colon can sever several functions. Most of these cannot correctly be done using a comma instead. A colon can introduce a list. There are four chores I want you to do: make the bed, do the dishes, mow the lawn, and dust the mantel. If the list is only two items long, a comma might be used instead, but a colon is clearer and better; there is no ...


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Perhaps it is a combination of these two other answers. Perhaps "chops" refers to a skill. In this case "hopping chops" refers to the player's skill in hopping. "Building" refers to increasing, and so "Building hopping chops" is referring to the process of improving one's skill: learning to hop better. If someone were to ask "What is a good strategy for ...


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If he was half as crazy as his father , then he was capable of anything was how Mr. Wholesale Gustavsson saw it,and since he wanted to be around quite a bit longer ... The translation is badly structured. This would be better English: How Mr. Wholesale Gustavsson saw it was that if he was half as crazy as his father, then he was capable of anything. And ...


1

The second form is a lot more literal and awkward in day-day speak. Your first example is what I'd consider "normal" for casual speaking. Another way to say it would be to say “I'd love to change my departure time to July 6th, 15:30pm” You don't have to explicitly state that you're changing both the date and time- that'd be implied by the date/time ...


32

"Chops" is a term for technical skill. It's usually used when referring to a musician's ability with their instrument, but in this case the game is referring to your skill in hopping as your "hopping chops". It's telling you that a good strategy to avoid unexpected dangers is to get good at quickly hopping to the side.


3

In the context, building - refers to to increase or strengthen by adding gradually to. Given your definition of hopping chops (not, to my ear, a phrase outside of the game), I would interpret the phrase to mean that the player should perform hopping chops one after another to increase their strength. This may consist of holding the key down to build up ...


3

As this is from a movie script, it isn't an actual expert talking, but a writer who is trying to sound like an actual expert, and some things are wrong. I think that here the writer is confusing the hydraulic lifts that a vehicle repair shop will have to raise cars when fixing the underside, with the idea of towing cars to the garage, and has coined the ...


4

The phrase isn't "spring for action" it's only "sprung for action." As you guessed, it essentially means ready for action--coiled with tension, like a compressed spring that is full of potential energy and ready to be sprung. It's most closely associated with verb definitions 1.6, 3.8, and 13.8-13.9 at this wiktionary link, especially the last two, which ...


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When explaining a simple procedure, or telling a simple story, you can say "That's all there is to it" when you're done, which means, "We're done. Wasn't that simple?" Here it means, "Perhaps there's nothing more to the story (the story has ended). Perhaps he's simply dead and there's nothing else going on." Also see: "there's not much to it" = "it's ...


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They mean the same thing. Though, it is unclear what either of them mean. I guess the sparrow was one of a group of birds, and happened to be flying or perched higher than all the others?


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The comma and semicolon are both used to show or create pause points in sentences. Therefore, they can often be interchangeable and still conform to what is generally considered acceptable. However, the meaning will generally be changed, even if it is a subtle change. In general, semicolons create a stronger pause. If two parts of a sentence are ...


1

It's a normal adverb/verb pairing, just in what I consider an unusual order. The speaker has a formal British accent, appropriate to the senior staff of a fancy hotel, so we can assume he is speaking "proper" English for that dialect. As an American, however, I would have said coming shortly, (i.e. "coming soon"). "We have" is an indirect, and therefore ...


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You may be overthinking this. The author seems just to want to avoid using the word "driving" repeatedly, so he uses the synonym "riding". But that is a stylistic choice rather than a grammatical requirement. It doesn't seem to imply anything very special. It is also possible, looking only at the short extract, that the author is riding/driving a ...


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The word left can mean leaving something behind deliberately or unintentionally (i.e., through forgetfulness). So, for a sentence like: I left my umbrella at home. there is no way to tell if that was intentional or not. However, sometimes context will make it obvious which is case: I meant to bring my hat, but I left it on the countertop. ...


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In a broader sense, it means to overcome a difficulty, to persevere, to go through a tough period, to undergo an unpleasant experience. There is a song called "Stone Cold" where Demi Lovato sings Me and my heart, we'll make it through. meaning she will find the strength to move on after breaking up with the person she was in love with. Usually, it's to ...


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"to" is highly idiomatic there, and means something like "in relation to". "that's all there is to it" means that there's nothing else that can be added in relation to that (whatever "that" is). The speaker admits that that is all he/she knows about it. The sentence can be interpreted as coming from "there is nothing else to be added to it". If there is ...


2

"All that there is to it" means "All that goes into making it" - here in the sense of "all that it amounts to" or "all the substance in it". So "That's all that there is to it" means "There is nothing else to it" or "there is no nothing further to be found in it". Here probably "There is no further explanation or significance to it". The only other use ...


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The second one is grammatical, but quite literary (the use of "our" with an "-ing" word is something that many people would not use in speech.) The first is not grammatical because there is no noun phrase to act as the subject of "seems". To make it grammatical you would need something like "I understand some people will feel that the fact that we are ...


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This is the meaning of by that we have in this paragraph: Not later than: by 5:30 PM. (American Heritage) "Post-operatively" refers to the period of time that starts when the surgery is finished. Here's what the sentence means: At the latest, within three months to three years, the effect of the surgery is the same as with non-surgical treatments.


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It's always hard to say what's meant by the words of a song, since they're often closer to poetry than to prose. Here's what I think: 'Pick up and put on your attitude' means to assume an attitude, probably an attitude of arrogance or hubris, judging from the rest of the line. The verb 'to put on' in this case means 'to dress oneself'. He's talking about '...


2

I agree that 'odds at stake' is not idiomatic. I think it is a combination of two other phrases that are commonly used at times like this when the author is trying to build suspense. Sometimes people mistakenly conflate two commonly used phrases and come up with something that doesn't mean what they're trying to say. The two phrases that are being confused ...


3

The difficulty here is that the woman is using sarcasm. In other words, she means the exact opposite of what she is saying. “Little human touches” implies service that is very personal and empathetic and that the people giving the service are taking care about you directly and concerning themselves with what you need. The opposite of “little human ...


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According to the OED, byss is an obsolete word meaning the opposite of “abyss”. “A” is sometimes a prefix denoting negation. So I’m guessing Churchill means “infinite heights and infinite depths”. He’s being poetical, and comparing this to infinity and negative infinity. It’s not a word you will ever see in normal speech or writing. It’s one of two ...


1

flukishly calling to life [The bullets passed through his brain] fortunately, or even surprisingly, rekindling a vivid memory... a summer afternoon some forty years past ...of a summer afternoon forty years ago... and long since lost to memory ...that had been forgotten a long time ago (by Anders).


0

1) A grammatically correct English sentence indicating that the number of bacterial cells in the human body is equal to ten times (10x) the number of "human cells" in the human body (except there should be a "the" between "in" and "human") at the end. 2) An almost grammatically correct English sentence: if there was some quality that bacterial cells had ten ...


1

The phrase "This is all about..." is sometimes used to imply that what matters in a particular situation is not what is apparently happening on the surface but something else. So, for example, when a candidate for high office is revealed as having done something silly as a young person, you might say "this is all about undermining his claim to be a wise ...


1

Google Dictionary says: act as a neutralizing or counterbalancing force to (something). "their idealism is tempered with realism" synonyms: moderate, modify, modulate; tone down, mitigate, palliate, alleviate, allay, assuage, lessen, reduce, weaken, lighten, soften, cushion; qualify The noun originally denoted a proportionate mixture of elements or ...


1

Thanks to BrE speakers who have commented/written answers. I think it's now safe to say this sense of rammed as "crammed, packed" is indeed a Britishism. I couldn't find anything in dictionaries touching "rammed up", but there is one entry on "rammed": UK INFORMAL very full or crowded: On the trip back the train was rammed and I couldn't find a ...


2

Ram in this sense means to Cram or Stuff So it is saying that they emptied the tenement once, but now it has been rammed/crammed/stuffed back in (full to bursting) Source (click see more) to cram; stuff: They rammed the gag in his mouth.


0

Having watched the video, it is making an analogy of network traffic with real sound. Imagine a very very noisy person banging on all the doors and windows of all the houses in a street trying to see if any are open - That's how nmap appears to a detection system. The firewalls will know you are doing it.


0

I don't have time to watch and listen to the whole video, but in technical contexts noise does not only refer to sounds but also to other disturbances in signals (see "signal-to-noise ratio" etc.). If for example nmap outputs a lot of stuff that is not of interest at the moment you could describe this output as noise.


0

I don't know where you got the idea that "noisy" only applies to voices. A good dictionary would give you an answer. Noisy describes anything "making or given to making a lot of noise" and also usually implies that the noise is excessive. A "noisy scanner" would be a scanner that makes more noise than is either wanted or expected from a scanner.


2

"due" in that phrase means "owing". This is saying that the amount you now owe whatever business sent the letter is {Amount}. The Final Balance now due is XXX. means the same as You now owe us XXX. Please pay us right away.


0

In both the figurative and literal sense, "to be there for" means to be present, implying that the presence is directed towards a specific end (i.e. for something). "I am here fore you" --> My emotional presence is intended to support you "I was there for it" --> My physical presence at the event allowed me to witness it. To answer your question: is it ...


0

Yes, it means that the security should be available for everyone.


1

Advertisements, especially the ones for discounts, are usually made to be misleading, tricking the honest customer's mind. Have in mind the usual: Discounts up to 80%!! What does that mean? That you can buy anything for 80% discount? Form my experience, it always means that there is a piece of rag with a discount of 80%, and everything else is pretty ...


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No, in cannot always be substituted for during: I fainted during the movie. → I fainted while watching the movie. I fainted in the movie. → I acted in the movie, and the character I played fainted in a particular scene. Note that context determines the meaning. If you've clearly established that you were in the audience watching a movie, then using ...


2

According to The Free Dictionary, it is an idiom and means: verb To take action to become well-organized, prepared, or in a better state of life. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between get and together. You need to get yourself together and finish packing so that we can leave for the airport on time tomorrow morning.


3

I understand why you think it is vague and strange — this sort of writing is quite evocative rather than explicitly descriptive. Jigsaw here, in describing geometry, is used to give a sense of “many things that fit together”. So “crazy, jigsaw geometry” is perhaps an unbelievable, haphazard arrangement of many things which fit together to give some overall ...


2

That looks like a mistake for preceding, which means the reverse of "following" - the one coming just before. "The proceeding file naming" doesn't make any sense at all to me. I take the intended meaning to be "The name for the file we have just mentioned should follow the rules ... "


1

You can’t think yourself into feeling any more than you can feel yourself into thinking To think yourself into feeling would be to use intellectual effort into having an emotional response To feel yourself into thinking is the opposite, to use emotional effort to get an intellectual response The author is saying you can't do either.


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In cricket, this is just the usual way of describing how many runs were scored from a certain number of balls. The batsman received 71 balls from the bowlers, and scored 148 runs, which is a very high score. The BBC wrote a very similar sentence: "The captain hammered 17 sixes in making 148 from 71 balls, ..."


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This sounds like it is describing a way of steering a paddle board.As they say, "It is not possible to turn in air" but if you push one end of the paddle (presumably double ended) into the water whilst in the air you can swing round it rather like a pole dancer can swing round a pole when their feet are off the ground.


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To hold down - If you hold someone down, you keep them under control and do not allow them to have much freedom or power or many Def. In the context above, it means you need to hold the padding in place I think.


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The first part of the sentence defines "contractual core duties" as duties which are pre-requisites to the other steps (which would thus be the "non-contractual core duties") that would fulfill the rest of the contract. The second part of the sentence implies that one or more "contractual parties" may rely on the fulfillment of these "contractual core ...


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Your statement "All starfish have 5 or more arms" is correct. But it's better to use "at least 5" (as discussed in the comments), as it already means 5 or more.


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