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You need to consider the tense of the reporting verb (says, said, etc). If the direct speech took place in the immediate past, and refers to something that is still the case, we can use the present tense. If the time (week, winter, season etc) can still, at the time of reporting, be referred to using 'this', then it does not change. Suppose that Mary said ...


3

This is a pretty common phrase. It is often used to describe someone who is quickly achieving something, repetitively making a good move, experiencing a streak of success. Imagine a batsman hitting 5 sixes in a row, or Steph Curry dropping 8 three pointers in a quarter (that wouldn't be a surprise though). Cambridge defines the phrase as "experiencing a ...


1

No. Something that imbues can do so with qualities or feelings, but not actions. The cool weather imbued him with a refreshing feeling. The color imbued a sad mood to the painting. The cool weather inspired him to hurry. The color inspired him to buy a shirt of the same color.


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The difference is subtle, and often trivial. Consider these two definitions from the Lexico/Oxford dictionary: progress (n): Forward or onward movement towards a destination. progression (n): The process of developing or moving gradually towards a more advanced state. If we think of "progress" as simply moving forward, and a "progression" as moving ...


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"I will give all-out of me" is not a natural construction. There are two idioms you seem to be combining here: one is to go all out, and the other is to give something your all. They both mean that you'll try your hardest or best. So a more natural version could be "I will go all out [to do x]" or "I will give [the task] my all" or "I will give ...


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From the Oxford English Dictionary: [behind a paywall] A. adv. Used predicatively: in a more favourable or advantageous position; esp. better provided with money or other resources. Cf. well off adv. Also: Frequency (in current use): Origin: Formed within English, by conversion. Etymon: of prep. And finally from that entry, also relevant here: A. adv. ...


0

Better off is an idiom, essentially stemming from well off. To be well off is to be wealthy or prosperous. Concentrating on prosperity, rather than wealth: to prosper means "to be or become successful, especially financially". The idiom, better off, therefore most-directly means "more likely to be successful". Better on it's own would not be correct, in ...


2

I wouldn't paraphrase any of those sentences in any of those ways. I would assume the speaker meant: I like to drink my coffee cold. Or, put even more simply: I prefer iced coffee. I think it's important to point out that a phrase like want/would like/prefer something (to be) is context-dependent, and one paraphrase won't necessarily apply to all ...


0

To me "a majority" makes no sense semantically. I believe majority is synonymous with "larger part" and you wouldn't say "a larger part of the students". On the other hand it may have to do with exact or arbitrary composition of the pieces of a whole. Say, if you had a very small class of students (just 5 people) and three voted for something and you knew ...


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https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/whether-you-say-freakin-friggin-or-frickin-depends-on-where-youre-from In this case, it's used as a softened version of the F-word.


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Society has had to enforce (from where?) from without (to enforce what?) rules (which are) meant to subdue tides of emotional excess that surge too freely within.


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In a rowing motion, the handles of the oars get both pulled toward you and pushed away from you. However, we usually focus on the motion when the blades of the oar are dipped in the water. You can row either way, but normally the blades are dipped when you pull, so that the boat moves in the direction opposite the way the rower is facing. However, rowers ...


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In the context of someone winning a competition, letting themselves get emotionally taken away would mean enjoying the moment and exploding in joy, putting all your emotions out of yourself, letting the emotions to control you.


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It can mean two things: I play soccer regularly, but I am not actually engaged in playing right at this moment. I know how to play soccer, and have played regularly in the past, but at this stage in my life I'm not on a team or otherwise playing regularly.


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Sorry to burst your bubble but Texas poon tappa is a reference from The Office in the last season. (It was someone’s username on YouTube that Andy got pissed at) It’s not a real thing and someone posted the urban dictionary definition as a joke.


2

To get through (something) means to succeed or finish SUCCEED FINISH I've got a stack of paperwork to get through before I can go out. -- Cambridge Dictionary The Cambridge dictionary does not describe this phrasal verb as informal, and says it is accepted in British English, American English and "business English". You may have ...


1

It means a "longer and more detailed discussion". In this context a discussion is probably not a spoken conversation, but a piece of academic writing that considers multiple points of view. Programmers in C++ should avoid using namespace std. For a fuller discussion of why this is the case, read the answers to Why is “using namespace std;” considered bad ...


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What is the difference between "in time" and "over time"? Like you mentioned, "in time" and "over time" seem to be synonyms. Of course "in time" has another meaning also, of "meeting a deadline." Is there a particular reason the writer of The American Pageant prefers "in time" here? Very interesting. I have not thought about this topic before, but "over ...


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The clock has a resolution of milliseconds. Yes. The clock is available in a resolution of milliseconds. No. The clock is available with a resolution of milliseconds. This is probably alright, although somehow not perfect. The following sort of phrasing might sound better: The clock is available with a resolution of either seconds or ...


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Answered in the comments: "You would not say concerned of either. It's concerned about and anxious about. Using of with either word is unidiomatic at best and ungrammatical at worst. If you insist on the specific phrase anxious of, then the answer here will be that it's wrong. You can change the word that comes before the preposition (such that of becomes ...


2

"Be expected to" and "needed to" are not general synonyms. Our guests are expected to arrive before two o'clock does not at all imply that Our guests need to arrive before two o'clock. Nor do I believe that "need" is socially considered to be rude, at least not in the U.S. However, in your specific context, you are practically correct to equate "are ...


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From the context you would have to assume that the "English Vocabulary Profile" was developed from the "Cambridge Learner Corpus". Any other interpretation doesn't make sense. In reading you must be thinking about the meanings of words and not only the grammatical connections between them.


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When we talk about veterans, one of the literal meanings is somebody who has fought in a war, as you already know. It can also mean somebody who has the experience of doing something or has done it for a long time. The second meaning is the one F. Scott Fitzgerald is using. He means that since he doesn't judge what people are saying to him he sometimes has ...


1

I agree that it's difficult to imagine a whole tree being cut into strips, and it's much easier to imagine the trunk being cut into thin strips. Because this is so obvious, I think the writer is trusting that the reader will understand that only the trunk can be cut into strips, so they don't bother to clarify that they're just talking about the trunk.


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Is the following sentence semantically correct The man cut the tree into thin strips. How can a tree be cut into thin strips? Yes of course a tree can be cut into thin strips. Why do you think it cannot? Not only the trunk (stem is the wrong word) but the branches can be cut into planks or even thinner strips. Of course if you only think of Fir trees it ...


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"Say focuses on the words someone said and tell focuses more on the content or message of what someone said:" = https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/say-or-tell


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Generally, you say something (to somebody), but you tell somebody something. That's just the way English is.


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Cambridge online dictionary: veteran = a person who has had a lot of experience of a particular activity, bore = to talk or act in a way that makes someone lose interest, =========================================================== Conclusion, "veteran bores" means: lot of experience to talk or act in a way that makes someone lose interest


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That's one way the phrase could be interpreted, especially if one reads the phrase very literally. but there is a subtler meaning to be understood in this context. The context is the study of vocabulary, not the study of lists. When we study vocabulary we study words. The list is a list of words that appear on the question papers, but the statement says ...


4

The phrase 'at stake' is idiomatic, which is what makes this hard to understand. The meaning of 'issues at stake' is similar to 'undecided questions' or 'unresolved conflicts'. To 'illuminate the issues at stake' means to explain the various perspectives involved in the questions or conflicts. The phrase 'at stake' relates to this meaning because one side ...


3

“Stake” comes from card games and gambling, where the “stake” is the prize or the pot. What has been put in the pot (what is at stake) will be won or lost. Examples when the police arrest you, your freedom is at stake. “With Brexit looming, the future of Ireland is at stake” USA Today / Yahoo News


1

In my opinion, it doesn’t make a major difference but still makes a difference. "They should have been together." Is definite and expresses no uncertainty in anyway "In a way, a part of you thinks they should have been together." This leaves some doubt and less certainty in the answer. It also adds the fact there are multiple angles and viewpoints in ...


0

I don't think that "In a way" changes a sentence that much. I believe that "In a way" sounds like you are uncertain that they should have been together, but "In a way", you could see how they could end up together. and Saying "They should have been together" sounds like you know for a fact or that you are very sure that they should've been together.


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You have only found one meaning of unaffected. There are two: not influenced or changed in any way natural and sincere Unaffected (Cambridge Dictionary) The words mean ""Gatsby, who represented everything for which I have a natural and sincere scorn." That is a scorn which is not pretended.


1

Such uses of "in the" may date back to when hell, or heaven, were commonly regarded as actual places that a person could be in. But few if any, people who now use such phrases still take that view. When this is combined with the use of minced oaths where part of the original expression is replaced with one of a similar sound or spelling, but a completely ...


3

These are purely idiomatic phrases, there is no systematic pattern of grammar here. Other similar examples "What the devil..." or the minced oath "What the Dickens..." And if I may advise, if you need to ask about an offensive or insulting phrase, then you don't know enough to use it convincingly.


6

A bunch of people here means: a group of people bunch Sour in this sense means: unfriendly or easily annoyed sour


9

"Sour", when applied to people, means their personality is "mean spirited" or "bad-tempered"; they are focussed on the negative. And “bunch”, as in a bunch of grapes, just means “a group of things, joined together in some way.” Here it is saying that statisticians consider "winnings" as "negative losses", and jokingly suggests that this shows that ...


0

The word "in" is used as an intensifier. The extra syllable adds emphasis to the exclamation. Additional words can be added in to further build on the intensity: What the hell What in the hell What in the damn hell What in the God damn hell What in the ever living God damn hell etc.


0

The general rule is the one below. anyone/anybody etc. are exactly the same. No difference at all. Somebody ate all the bread. [declarative pronoun] Did anybody eat all the bread? [interrogative pronoun] [The expectation is that a person OR Did somebody eat all the bread? [alternative interrogative pronoun] Nobody ate the bread. It's on the table. [...


-1

Basically I understand for “doorman” and “porter”, the man who is in the front of the hotel and who can helps with the luggage. Although Nothing James has said is incorrect I think there is a need to expand his answer. By definition A Porter can be a Doorman but a Doorman is not a Porter. Therefore you thoughts that they are the same is not far from the ...


2

It could be two jobs. The doorman stands at the door and welcomes guests. Typically he would stay at the door all day. Typically this would be an older gentleman. The porter works inside the hotel, carrying bags. Typically this would be a young man. Most hotels don't have traditional "doormen" anymore, but may have "security" at the door. You might see ...


0

The general meaning of adjoined is: close to or in contact with one another from m-w.com a room, building, or piece of land that adjoins something is next to it and connected to it from Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English In the specific context of hotel rooms, it refers to rooms that are physically next to each other, sharing a wall; and ...


2

If you look at the definition of as, you'll find this: Definition of as (Entry 4 of 9) ... : in the capacity, character, condition, or role of This is exactly the sense of as that is being used in your example: There's work we can do in our role of doctors to improve the experience for families as well as patients.


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Example sentence one is correct. We can use the past continuous tense to describe interrupted action in the past. This sentence makes perfect sense. Example sentence two is not incorrect. The Oxford English Grammar (1994) says this: Compare the past continuous and past perfect continuous. When I saw Debbie, she was playing golf. (I saw her in ...


3

'fairly' = 'somewhat' It's an indeterminate positive indicating that something is positively true - but it does not quantize how much it is true. Other Synonyms = 'a little', 'slightly' Fairly is stronger than 'a little', and stronger than 'slightly' but a weaker comparison than 'frequently' Truth is a binary concept in logic - but has degrees in ...


2

The lecturer said “with respect to time”, he didn't separate the "t" at the end of "respect" from the next "t" at the start of "to". If you play the video at 0.25 speed, you'll get this clearly, and there's nothing like "at". Don't be mislead by the auto-generated transcript.


0

It has nothing to do with them "being together". When the young woman thinks about dying, the nurse tells what it is like to be old, and have had thirteen children and been in the wurkus (workhouse). She means something like "you've seen nothing yet!" The phrase "Lor bless her dear heart" is a general exclamation of sympathy, rather than a prayer to God.


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Dickins is trying to emulate the speech of a lower class woman. "Lord [ie god] Bless her (dear heart)" This is kind of mini prayer, it expresses sympathy for someone" "she has lived as long as I have, sir" One reason for sympathy is that she is an old woman, at a time when there was little support for the elderly, if you didn't have a wealthy family. The ...


-1

Or, very simply put, stretching something to the limit is a slang expression referring to stretching something—a rubber band, for example—until it breaks; or stretching something until it can be stretched no more.


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