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In the UK we say 'plus' for the + sign, and 'minus' for the - sign. I suspect it is the same in US schools. Pronounce mathematical symbols In US English, a 'straight A' student is one who has achieved an A grades in every subject taken. We can use 'straight', mainly informally. to mean 'following one after another without an interruption; consecutive'. ...


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In US English (and perhaps other types of English, I'm not sure), this is really an idiomatic expression. I think it must be short for something like: "[That was an excellent] way to ... [do some activity]!" It can be used either as sincere praise: "Way to use your athletic skills!" or sarcastically, as a real reprimand: "Way to make us all look ...


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Words like conformist are not usually used predicatively as adjectives, but as nouns. So She is a conformist is far more common than She is conformist. There is not a great deal of difference in meaning between She has always been a conformist and She is always conformist; but if she used to a rebel but has now changed her ways, then the second would be ...


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To say that something turns out to be the case, you can use 'prove' followed by either: an adjective, or an infinitive verb and an adjective or noun. The tools proved useful. The new employee proved to be a fool. The car proved to have a flat tyre. Of your sentences, only the first is grammatical. The second uses the wrong verb form after 'proved' (must be ...


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When we say there are details to fill in, we mean there are missing details that need to be added to our understanding of a situation. We have a general idea about something but there are still questions about some of its finer aspects. You can think of the questions as holes or gaps in our knowledge. When we answer these questions we are 'filling in the ...


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It is business jargon. An employee who "delivers" means that the employee makes the company more successful. The company has set various goals for its employees. If the employee is delivering "against the goals" I would understand this to mean that they are being successful measured using the goals. You use "against" when using something to measure with. ...


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Lemonade is being used as a non-count or mass noun, because the enquiry was about the nature or composition of the drink. What is the black stuff in that pile on the ground? It is coal. What is that white powder on your hands (e.g. to a baker)? It is flour. What are honey gushers? It [a honey gusher] is lemonade. Mass noun


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The boys went into the room. = The boys entered the room. Generally, we would not say go inside the room unless, for example, the room was hidden behind a secret panel. Or, if you want to refer to inside and outside the room. They stayed inside the room upstairs while the robbers stole the money downstairs. The inside of the room or house was dark. Rooms ...


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"Inside" places more emphasis on the fact that the boys are now inside of something, and also places more direct emphasis on the room as a physical place, as oppose to it being considered more conceptually. It naturally includes awareness of its opposite, "outside". It would therefore be a bit odd to use "went inside the room" if they had only come from ...


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In this case, we are not dealing with a grammatical question, but a semantic one. All verbs mentioned here would fit well grammatically speaking, however, as we saw on Collins definition: to cause normally implies something bad. Therefore, other verbs would fit better there, such as: Persuade, lead, encourage, induce..


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"Experimental physicists don’t like theoretical physicists, because [...] they don’t really work at all." The joke is that theoretical physicists don't do any work. Usually the weekend is {Sat, Sun}. If you had a meeting on Saturday, you would spoil one weekend. But for theoretical physicists the weekend is {wed, thu, fri, sat, sun, mon, tue, wed}. So a ...


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You should understand that quite a large percentage of the American public cannot write well. Writing well is far more difficult than conversing well because, in conversation, tone of voice, emphasis, hand gestures, and opportunities for questions facilitate mutual understanding. Obviously, the sentence as written is nonsense: a complaining customer is ...


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“Keeping the complaining customer satisfied” refers to a process whereby things are continually done, or effort is made in some way, to make sure the customer is satisfied. To me the statement sounds a bit odd, as the customer is already said to be dissatisfied (complaining), though they are likely referring to customers who are prone to complaining, and it’...


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The author is just being humble, I think. He is acknowledging that without their help, he would not have been able to write that revised edition (at least not to that quality or standard). He acknowledges the considerable amount of contribution made by others. He is saying that it would not be right to take all the credit for all of that work. Of course, ...


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Your revised phrasing is not quite right, as the author is still actually making the claim, it’s just that they are also claiming to be unsure of its validity. This isn’t meant to be taken literally though; the author still knows they are the author. It’s an example of hyperbole, in this case likely used to express gratitude to contributors in a sort of ...


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The second one is the right one: "Polite society is outraged by the picture". Semantically, it is impossible for an image to be outraged so your first option wouldn't work, but it's also an incorrect interpretation, syntactically.


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A "tee" is an abbreviation for a t-shirt. In the image, the turkey on the left is wearing a t-shirt and the image printed on the t-shirt is of a skinny turkey body. So a 'Skinny Turkey Tee' is a t-shirt that has a skinny turkey printed on it. The joke is that the turkeys are wearing the t-shirts in an attempt to look thin so that they won't get slaughtered ...


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"I have got a woman at home." or "I've got a woman at home." are both correct grammatically. "I have a woman at home." is also correct. The grammar of "I got a woman at home." is not really correct by the standards of English teachers and/or grammar books. However everybody understands it, and it's very common to hear people say it that way casually in ...


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... I think it’s great because they’re all on the wrong lines. "They" here refers to the physicists. From Cambridge, one definition of "line" is (Approach to subject) a way of dealing with or thinking about something or someone It is "a way of thinking about a particular subject (often written as a line of reasoning)" We cannot agree with their ...


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It means that the scientists are following the wrong lines of thought. A line of thought is a common idiom referring to the logic that someone followed to conclude something. For example, if I told you that I enjoyed eating at McDonald's, your line of thought might look like this: McDonald's serves primarily hamburgers. -> NegativeFriction likes eating at ...


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//They would often visit friends in Europe. They often visited friends in Europe.// Compare these two: They said, "We will often visit friends in Europe." They said that they would often visit friends in Europe. (This cannot be replaced by 'They often visited friends in Europe.) They said, "We often visit friends in Europe." They said that they often ...


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The noun lingua is not used (Is it even in an English dictionary?). It's probably been made redundant in the formation of the English language from its ancestors. Tongue is always used as the noun, and can mean "language" as well, for example mother tongue (the language one learned from one's mother). On the other hand, the adjectival form lingual is used, ...


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The simple explanation is that in anatomy, latin terms are used (for adjectives "dorsal"= of the back, "ventral"= of the belly/front, "jugular"=of the throat, "ischemic", "sciatic", "cranial", ... ; or for parts, like "retina", "vena cava", "atrium", "vestibula", "cranium", ... ). In English, you will find "lingua"/"lingual" almost exclusively used in an ...


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lingua isn't used on its own, but the latin root is part of a lot of words. sublingual - below the tongue linguist - someone who studies languages bilingual - someone who speaks 2 languages linguine (or linguini) - a delicious pasta, that somehow relates to tongues.


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I cannot think of any use of lingua however sublingual means under the tongue. Sub means under or below and lingual means tongue. The word tongue is not used for the anatomical structure alone. For instance, the tongue of the shoe.


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Proceed: meaning to continue as planned would be better than "How to do". How to do what? However, if writing instructions it is better to use a 'Task-oriented' Active voice, for example: To make a cup of coffee: Fill kettle Heat water to 87.6 C... Select cup or mug Select coffee of choice etc.... "How to proceed" is a bit redundant ...


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This looks like a non-standard use to me. The phrase "flung theirs hands up" (or close variations) is a cliché - or actually, it's a part of a number of different clichés. You may read about people flinging up their hands in supplication, in horror, in defeat, in shock, in celebration, etc. It tends to have a literal meaning, describing a gesture (or ...


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This quote simply says that if a person does not appreciate the mysterious wonders of science and art ,is better dead than live. So life is a new perception and if one does not have this ability to find true meaning of life .......


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Yes, those are good explanations of the meaning. Taking you "over" someone else means to choose you and not someone else. So, the full meaning of the question would be, "why should we choose you instead of one of the other applicants."


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"Lingua" is not an English word. To my knowledge it is only found (in English) in the expression lingua franca which comes from Italian and refers to a "common language" between two or more groups of people. It is a loan word. When referring to the anatomical thing, we always say "tongue" and never "lingua." "Lingua" itself is Latin, and this root is the ...


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I don't think your research is correct at all. FIFO as an acronym (note the capitalisation) has a number of meanings, including "first in, first out", and also "fly in, fly out". I have no reason to think that any of these relate to 'Fifo's Fraud'. Note that it is not capitalised, and is also used in possessive form. It isn't an 'expression' but seems to ...


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This may help. Suppose the answer to a question is "Yes, they fought." This would have two different meanings for two different questions: Did Joe and Pete fight? Yes, they fought. Did Joe and Pete fight in the war? Yes, they fought. In the first case, Joe and Pete are understood to have fought each other. In the second case, they are understood to ...


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To hold out means to offer, as the dictionary says. If I hold a dollar bill, it is in my hand, I possess it. It's in my hand. That's all. If I hold out a dollar bill to someone, e.g. by extending my arm, I am offering it to that person. To hold out a possibility is to offer it as a possible opportunity for consideration or action. To 'hold a possibility' ...


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All of the presented possibilities are possible and reading the sentence in isolation can only leave you to guess which one is correct. The standard implication for both sentences is that the two subjects are doing the action with each other. With surrounding context, however, other meanings could become more likely. There are also other words you could add ...


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Yes, you have the right idea. I interpret it to imply disagreement, incompatibility, incongruity, etc. I really can't say that this is common expression, at least in everyday language. But it's understandable. The idea of perpendicularity suggesting dissimilarity is not unprecedented: perpendicular 4 : relating to, uniting, or consisting of individuals ...


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The word over here means: with regard to the subject of, in terms of, concerning, etc. a sense of failure over [with regard to, about, concerning, on the subject of] never having made it as a professional actor With words relating to situations, you will often find this word over, We had a disagreement over the money she owed me. I felt very bad over the ...


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This is an antiquated usage that you would find in the King James Bible or other writing from the 16th or 17th century. Extrapolating from the OED definition you have provided, we can assume its meaning is something like 'by' or 'for'. If someone does something 'unto oneself', they are doing it for themselves or by themselves. If a person is a 'law unto ...


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Based on your comment I'd say you've understood the meaning. It is the overall situation rather than the details. Another way to understand it is all of the details we can see in the 'picture' of our life, rather than just one detail. When we look at all the details of the situation together, rather than just the problem we're currently dealing with, our ...


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Let's pick the phrase apart in order to understand it, because it's complex. to be directed at = to be intended to have an effect, or to be going in the direction of having an effect to be directed at eventually = to be intended have an effect after some time to bear on = to have relevance to to be directed to eventually bear on = to be intended ...


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The two verb phrases, 'to take up' and 'to take on' are used in many different idiomatic phrases. The meanings vary and they have to be learned individually. take up arms - arm oneself for a fight take up sewing - start sewing as a pastime or occupation take up a skirt - shorten the skirt take on water - when a boat leaks water from outside ...


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For A to command B's obedience means that B obeys A's commands (in a general, ongoing sense). For example, a ruler commands the obedience of their subjects in that if they give a command, they can expect it will be obeyed; it describes the relationship, rather than the act. In this context, it's asking if physical reality obeys these hypothetical 'laws' ...


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I don't think you'll find a single word. "Witty" could work for "smart" and "funny". But don't think you could combine "awesome" in there.


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Bear on X means "to be relevant to". The X in both instances of the phrase in your provided paragraph is "questions like the one Jim was alluding to a minute ago".


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It's fairly common to use cast in this context, but perhaps not immediately obvious what it means. When we use the word "cast" as a verb, it's hard to put ones finger on a cover-all definition, but lets start of with the google definition: Cast [literal] to throw (something) forcefully in a specified direction. You may have heard the phrase: "Cast ...


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The first quote is saying that each person has inherent value. You do not need to accomplish something incredible or prove that you are more clever than another person before you will be a worthwhile human being. The second quote means to work to the best of your abilities. It is saying that the best of your abilities may not be the perfect way to do ...


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Yes, recipient can be used for objects, for example, in chemistry. Khan Academy (about chemical bonds): In general, the loss of an electron by one atom and gain of an electron by another atom must happen at the same time: in order for a sodium atom to lose an electron, it needs to have a suitable recipient like a chlorine atom. Wikipedia (about ...


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A recipient, as your definition states, is normally a person or an organisation. You may be after the similar word receptacle. A container, device, etc., that receives or holds something (Dictionary.com) As in: Please take a receptacle to the water fountain. A "water recipient" to me would be a person who is given water. But it sounds quite formal, ...


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"Get", besides "acquire", can mean "become". James got drunk at the party. In the above example, James became drunk at the party. He probably drank a lot of alcohol. It could have been by himself or someone else made him drink a lot. He just became drunk. Elsie got her hair cut today and she looks lovely. We get our clothes washed at the laundry. ...


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It's nothing to do with what the characters are trying to do, and I find it odd that you think that. Indeed the concept makes my head hurt a bit. Rather, it means that they appear in other works by other authors, and/or that people sometimes talk about them as if they're real. For example I might quote Holmes as saying "When you've eliminated the ...


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The characters have become synonymous with attributes or failings. We know that being a Scrooge is being mean, being like Dracula is to be a bloodsucker or parasite..'it's like putting Dracula in charge of a blood bank'...or displaying an unusual degree of acuity and observation like Sherlock Holmes. It helps that all have names that are pretty well unique ...


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