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1 vote

Should I create my own word, for example "questionworthy", when I write in English?

You can't make up a word without defining it. So I would only make up a word if I were going to use it repeatedly throughout a document. The first time you use it, you should define it so that ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
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2 votes

Meaning of "Call (God) holy"

In this setting, the parentheses don't indicate that the word God is optional. Rather, they mean that for this definition, the typical direct object of bless will be God. The OED definition in ...
Dave's user avatar
  • 69
0 votes

"Upon" versus "on the basis"

They mean two different things. Upon written notice refers to a time when the agreement terminates, which is the the time the written notice is provided to the other party. On the basis of refers to a ...
swmcdonnell's user avatar
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3 votes

Should I create my own word, for example "questionworthy", when I write in English?

The general principle is obviously that learners should be extremely cautious about "inventing" new terms, because they're so much more likely to get things wrong than native speakers. Here'...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
1 vote

Should I create my own word, for example "questionworthy", when I write in English?

Of course, all words must have been made up by someone at some point in time. But as an English learner you normally avoid this. In the particular case "questionworthy" already has some use....
James K's user avatar
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2 votes

Should I create my own word, for example "questionworthy", when I write in English?

English usage gives one the freedom to create new words by analogy, especially if no apt word already exists. Often when such coinages are made the coiner will put the word inside quotation marks on ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
1 vote

"To the extent that" means "if" or "when"?

My question is: Could "To the extent that" mean "if" or "when"? This seems to be a possible gripe about the changing use of language. Language changes, otherwise none of ...
user81561's user avatar
  • 2,589
0 votes

"To the extent that" means "if" or "when"?

It depends by what you mean by could … mean. You’ve cited evidence that some speakers do use it with that meaning. That’s what’s known as a descriptive account. But the passage you cite from Urban ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
-1 votes

leaving and causing referring?

leaving doesn't "refer" to anything, pace ChatGPT. The two participial clauses, one headed by causing the other by leaving, are coordinated asyndetically instead of syndetically by and. Both ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
0 votes

leaving and causing referring?

What’s leaving the area of alopecia is the breaking off. Here you can think of the word leaving as performing exactly the same function, and with the exact same meaning as which leaves.
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

How to understand the usage of 'turn' in the clause: no sensible writer delib­erately avoids turning a graceful phrase?

There is an idiom that the author is playing with "turn a phrase", and the related "turn of phrase", meaning (to use) distinctive, or skilful language. You can also use it to ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
2 votes

Is it an Invention or Discovery

An invention is something you create. For example, Alexander Graham Bell is credited with inventing the telephone. He conceived the idea, designed it, built it, and patented it. A discovery is ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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2 votes

Can a doula be a male? If not, what is the male equivalent of it?

First off, this is a pretty rare word. I had to look up its meaning, and visit a the natural childbirth trust website to understand how it differed from "midwife" (another word that that ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
7 votes
Accepted

Why is it written in an 'it is that' structure?

Poirot is a French-speaking Belgian, and the author (Agatha Christie) writes his dialogue in such a way as to appear "foreign", as he is speaking with an accent. The "It is that" ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
0 votes

"I rarely purchase concessions at the theater", with "concessions" in the sense of "products we buy at the concessions"

Concession(s), the industry term, concession stand and concession counter or concession(s) are very well known to moviegoers in the US. However, buy concessions is simply not said. You buy popcorn or ...
Lambie's user avatar
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3 votes

"I rarely purchase concessions at the theater", with "concessions" in the sense of "products we buy at the concessions"

Yes, as noted in the comments, in some regional dialects of American English, "concessions" can mean foods or drinks sold at a concession stand - which is a booth, cart, or small shop that ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
3 votes

as having over / for having over – are both correct? Do the sentences mean the same?

To me, the likely meanings / contexts are different... 1: The article was flagged as [being X] ... implies flagging = labeling in the context of a classification exercise. Every article is assigned ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
-2 votes

as having over / for having over – are both correct? Do the sentences mean the same?

They are both correct but with different meanings. "as having" - A flag was set which signals that the article has over 50% AI content. The fact that this flag is set means that it has ...
timchessish's user avatar
  • 1,891
2 votes

as having over / for having over – are both correct? Do the sentences mean the same?

I would say that (1) is more idiomatic. You flag something (mark it for attention) as having (because it has) a certain quality. You flag something for a particular person's attention rather than for ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

How to understand 'Worst Best' in 'The Worst Best Economy Ever'?

"Worst best" may seem a contradiction in terms, and often it is used that way either for comic effect or to make a satirical point. However, it could be perfectly normal in specific contexts....
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
0 votes

Zero article means in general or all?

What you've learned about zero-article nouns seems sound, but the examples are mostly bad. 'Advice', as a noun on its own, is always uncountable - it never has an article and cannot be pluralised. ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 104k
1 vote

Zero article means in general or all?

Your source is wrong (if quoted correctly). Zero articles or null determiners (used with uncountable and plural countable nouns) can be either universal/generic (all/in general) or existential (some):...
ishtar's user avatar
  • 68
0 votes

Expression "Mind (you)"

"Mind" and "mind you" are rude and short versions of "bear in mind" and "bear in mind, you". Generally, they are commands to keep a particular bit of ...
johnwbyrd's user avatar
  • 131
0 votes

a man tall and strong

I talked to a tall and strong man like you. This suggests that the speaker considers the listener to be a tall and strong man, similar to the one the speaker talked to. It is left unclear whether the ...
Glen O's user avatar
  • 757
3 votes

a man tall and strong

The post-position of coordinated adjectives can be an oral storytelling feature, and for that reason it can sound archaic: They came to a dale deep and wooded. But it occurs often enough in everyday ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
4 votes

a man tall and strong

Number 1 I talked to a tall and strong man like you. This sounds a little bit awkward, and could mean that the speaker talked to a man similar to the listener. Since the speaker notes that the man ...
Friendly Racoon's user avatar
0 votes
Accepted

Usage of "still" and "not yet." Are those two the same in meaning?

Yes, they have the same meaning. If you are 'still getting used to' something, you have not finished the process of becoming completely familiar with it. So it is also correct to say that you are not ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.6k
0 votes

Can we usually use the word still in a negative sentence?

She is still not here. She wasn't here. This remains the case. She is not still here. She was here. It is not that this remains the case; in other words, she is not here anymore.
ryang's user avatar
  • 272
2 votes
Accepted

Can we usually use the word still in a negative sentence?

Positive and negative are irrelevant to the usage of the word still. As used in the OP, "still" has a general meaning of "up to the present moment", and can be used to qualify ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
2 votes

What is "real men"?

"Real men" is a phrase commonly used to discuss characteristics of masculinity. As such it is gender specific: it refers to males only. Depending on context it may be used both seriously and ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
2 votes

What does "off the bench" mean?

"Pest" used in multiple sports, but in basketball, usually a defensive player who frustrates and disrupts the plays of the opposing team. Here is an article about the biggest pests of the ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
0 votes

Difference between "the number of people you would have thought" OR "the number of people you would think"?

The two forms are largely interchangeable in practice, but describing what one "would have thought" places slightly more emphasis on the idea that this thinking might have turned out to be ...
BobH's user avatar
  • 164
3 votes

What does "off the bench" mean?

I suggest that "off the bench" here means a player who was sitting on the bench, ready to play, who has now just been called into the game to start playing. In your example, he came off the ...
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
2 votes

What does "hope was all" represent in "Hope was all we could offer from our vantage point in Ketchum Hall"?

The comment above answers this correctly. One could rephrase the sentence as "We could offer only hope..." or "We could offer nothing more than hope". The sense is that we have no ...
Jim Davis's user avatar
  • 121
3 votes

What does 'walk out' mean in 'You go out for a walk out in a green space which helps with fitness'?

"Walk" and "out" aren't meant in combination. The second "out" is part of the phrase "out in a green space." It's clunky and poorly written, but you're chasing ...
digimunk's user avatar
  • 215
4 votes
Accepted

What does 'walk out' mean in 'You go out for a walk out in a green space which helps with fitness'?

I'm not sure if the sentence is wrong, but it's certainly not the way I would say it. The word out is repeated; I would only say it once. Either: You go out for a walk in a green space... Or: You ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
0 votes

He always does some crazy things and (when he does), the girls freak out. - can it mean the same without the part in the parentheses?

In coordinated constructions like this: A {does | will do something} and B {does | will do something}. the coordination with and is often intended to express a cause-and-effect relationship and in ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
2 votes

I am capable of accessing trains easily because I live close to a train station. - does this indicate an ability still?

No, able to does not refer only to physical or intellectual abilities. Consider, for example We’re unable to accept your gracious invitation because we’ve promised our daughter we’d watch her ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
2 votes

I am capable of accessing trains easily because I live close to a train station. - does this indicate an ability still?

Capable of normally refers to your physical or intellectual ability to do something, not to an ability resulting from the fact that you happen to live near the railway station. So I would consider (1) ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 55.6k
2 votes

wearing a beautiful wedding gown

None of these sound natural in English, mainly for the reason Yosef Baskin explained: All are ambiguous about who is wearing the wedding gown or seem to connect the kiss to the wedding gown in a way ...
mamster's user avatar
  • 1,251
3 votes
Accepted

The meanings of 'schemes' and 'borough' in context

"Schemes": Literally an organised plan for doing something. In context he is referring to "Youth schemes" a term that is now rather dated for various plans to provide for training ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
0 votes

Meaning of "while it was not clear whether it was a case of pouring passion onto his reason"

Not to interpret the metaphors, merely pointing them out... To "pour passion onto" something casts passion as a liquid of some kind. Gasoline? Water? Hot cocoa? Tea? The "underlying ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
0 votes

What is the meaning of "they've got life beat."?

The underlying structure of "they've got life beat" is [ "get" + object + adjective ], meaning to cause object to be in an adjective state. Here's another example: I've got the ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
-1 votes

What is the meaning of "they've got life beat."?

"I think the word beat is used as [speech category] It is idiomatic spoken slang, so there is really no meaningful grammar category. It's dangerous to say "it means 'beaten'" (as in a ...
Fattie's user avatar
  • 1,267
3 votes

meaning of "work itself out"

This answer is offered as an addition to the useful comments already provided. the quoted sentence is: As the capitalist system works itself out and its nature becomes more clear, the opposition of ...
Peter Kirkpatrick's user avatar
3 votes

meaning of "work itself out"

With works itself out Russell is referring to the process envisioned by Marx whereby "every man is, or must soon become, wholly the one or wholly the other", wage-earner or capitalist, and ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 127k
8 votes

What is the meaning of "they've got life beat."?

"Beat" could be "beaten" in this example. And "got life beat" is a get-passive. Putting this together we can rephrase in an active voice, and with the relative clause ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
6 votes
Accepted

"She nods for him to open the box full of butter biscuits"

This is not an idiom. In English cultures a "nod" (moving the head down and up) is the body language sign for "Yes". The word "for" can indicate a purpose. The purpose ...
James K's user avatar
  • 224k
1 vote

What's the meaning of "get the car"?

Ditto to RubioRic's answer. I upvoted it. Let me just add: It's common in American English, at least, to talk about "getting the car", meaning to leave the building you are in, find the car ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 66.8k
2 votes

What does "do someone's bidding on" mean?

To 'do someones' bidding' is a formal, and slightly (not very) old-fashioned expression meaning to obey instructions or requests actually given by that person, and it is often used in situations where ...
Michael Harvey's user avatar

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