24

There are many options to choose from. Here are a few that are polite. "You can stop off here, if you like; I can easily walk to my apartment from this corner." Another option is: "My home is inside this community, but to save you needing to drive through you are welcome to drop me off here." Your friend is not correct is saying that the "can" ...


13

A similar question came up recently but in a restaurant setting. If you say: You can get me the bill now. that's rude because you are telling the waiter what to do. It's the same as saying: Go and get me the bill now. Fetch me the bill now. The waiter knows beforehand that the bill is required at the end of the meal. The only thing you're saying ...


9

The standard sentence (at least in the UK) is: Anywhere here is fine, thanks. No need to overcomplicate it.


7

It's polite to say "you can" if you're letting someone know it's okay by you to do something that may be more convenient for them. You should only use it if you're fine with them choosing not to do that thing. It's rude to say "you can" when you're asking someone to do something for you. This means it's fine in your example. The driver can drop you at the ...


3

It all depends on tone of voice: "You can stop here." is fine if your tone of voice is nice. Also, it is the same thing as: "Can you stop here". It's as simple as that. But, it is always a good idea to say please. Your friends are wrong. "You can" does not mean your are the master. Your tone of voice is what makes a difference in cases such as these. ...


2

The other answers are all fine, but in the specific case of taxi ride, I'll offer a slightly different opinion about the social aspect of it: "Stop Here" or "Stop here, please" is fine, especially if both of you are speaking English as a second language. Clarity and brevity are important, especially since time is a factor. Your demeanor when you speak ...


2

All modal verbs (can may must shall will could might should would) are followed by the bare infinitive For most verbs the bare infinitive is the same as the first person present tense. In English the tense is indicated in the modal verb, and the main verb doesn't have tense (it is infinitive) So "couldn't got" is a grammar error and "couldn't get" is ...


1

The choice depends on the timing of the events in question. We don't know from your statement whether the presentation has already taken place or whether it still lies in the future. We only know that your preparation for the presentation is past. Neither do we know whether the future you speak of still lies ahead of you or whether you are looking back ...


1

If you are talking directly about something that happened in the past, you just use simple past: I ran after a bus and caught it. If you describe the same event in a that-clause, you have the option of focusing on the ability to do something, rather than on the doing itself, for example: I was pleased that I could run fast enough to catch the bus. - ...


1

In purpose clauses with "so that" and "in order that", "can" is used in present/future settings, and "could" is used in past settings. Thus, you can have: You must carry on (now) so that you can succeed (in the future). You had to carry on (in the past) so that you could succeed (in the past). Depending on the context, instead of "can" you can find "will" ...


1

The sentence Oh, right... I'm going to go to the movies with him today, so I could've returned his pen then. is referring to stopping by the friend's house at lunchtime. The speaker realises that they've wasted their effort by making a special trip to their friend's house when they could have waited until tonight to return the pen instead. This is ...


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