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16 votes

"Could" at the beginning of a non-question sentence

[Tried to answer this question when it was posted on English Language and Usage but the question was locked there even as I was editing the quotation, and subsequently migrated here. Rather than waste ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 130k
12 votes

"Could" at the beginning of a non-question sentence

Raymott, on UsingEnglish.com, correctly states: "Could he but reach town in time, he could prevent the disaster." [Old-fashioned usage]. = "If he could only reach town in time, he ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
4 votes

What is the difference between verbs "will" and "would"?

The explanations to follow are based on A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language, Quirk et al, 1985. Those two verb forms are modal, the first being the present of the verbal (modal) auxiliary &...
LPH's user avatar
  • 877
4 votes

What is the difference between verbs "will" and "would"?

Will here means is willing to. He refuses to listen (now). He refused to listen (in the past).
Kate Bunting's user avatar
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3 votes

"Could" at the beginning of a non-question sentence

English is a Germanic language but has been much more influenced by Romance languages than most other Germanic languages. As a native German speaker, I can tell you that such conditionals make ...
Bolpat's user avatar
  • 131
2 votes

"Could" at the beginning of a non-question sentence

It's good English, no changes are needed.
alan2here's user avatar
  • 129
1 vote

I don't think you'll get all of the items at that shop

1.I think you might not get all ... 2.I don't think you'll get all ... 3.I think you might not be able to get all ... 4.I don't think you'll be able to get all ... The four examples state respectively ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar

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