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Meaning of "no <things> must/should [...]"

Your intuitive reading is right. Negation of modals is often tricky, and in this case the opposite of shall is shall not, but the opposite of must isn't must not - it's don't have to. Negating shall ...
Maciej Stachowski's user avatar
4 votes
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what is the Difference between using "could not" and "might not" in 3rd conditional sentences?

Yes, there is a difference If I had missed the train, we might not have met. If I had missed the train, it's possible that we might have met at a different time and place than we did because I ...
Dale M's user avatar
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1 vote

Difference between can and could when talking about possibility

He couldn't be a doctor. Those are crime syndicate tats. Paraphrase: I don't suppose he's a doctor. Would a doctor have crime syndicate tattoos? He can't be a doctor. Paraphrase: No way he's a ...
TimR's user avatar
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1 vote

Difference between can and could when talking about possibility

'Couldn't' (or could not) can be used about the past or the possible future with conditions attached. Examples: I went to the library but couldn't find a book I liked (past) I could never watch a ...
Astralbee's user avatar
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How do we use can in questions

Statement: Could indicates that something is possible, but not certain. Can is used in general statements about what is possible. Can [present tense] you swim now because before you coudn't. [past ...
Lambie's user avatar
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“Can I not read it”?

"Do I have to read it?" That's natural and unambiguous.
Jack O'Flaherty's user avatar
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Modals in use "can"

"It can rain tomorrow" is not idiomatic at all. I'll try and explain why. 'Can' is a modal verb used to indicate possibility; however, it is used differently than other modals, such as '...
Astralbee's user avatar
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