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will have is a way of discussing the future or future intent, either: (a) with respect to having something, e.g. "I hope they will have fun this evening", or (b) followed by a past participle, to form the construction known as the future perfect, e.g. "after two more years I will have lived here for five years". There's also "will ...


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See this New York Times article "May, Might, Muddle" It's my contention that "X may not have happened" means that we don't know whether or not it did, while "X might not have happened if..." means that it did happen but could have been avoided. Newspaper articles often say something like "If it had not been for [something] ...


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Firstly lets get some perspective and correct your misconception. In some instances the two are directly inter changeable like with an introduction or a weak possibility. In others, like General Truths, they are not. In other situations, Permissions, Suggestions and the suggestion of a possibility might is the more polite form of may. Hence in most ...


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Do you have any authority for claiming a difference in meaning between “may” and “might”? I have never heard of such a difference. Consequently, I looked at Merriam-Webster, which makes no such distinction. “Might” is the past tense of “may.” It is not usual in English for tense to alter fundamental meaning. In short, I believe you are trying to cope with a ...


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You are right - out of the options presented, must be is correct. Here are some reasons you can provide if needed: The tone of the overall text is instructional and firm. There are no other instances of "loose" language like should, would, could, etc Other instructions present in the text are similarly firm, using must and only to emphasize that ...


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"May" can replace "can" in all three examples. "You may" also can be interpreted as "you are permitted". "Can" should, as a rule, describe the ability to do something. In examples 1, and 3, "can" makes an assumption about the ability & availability of funds that might not prove true. The fact ...


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It was a step toward independence and getting rid of foreign interference, but it might have gone too ideological on this ground.


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“She could go to school last year” this doesn’t sound right “She could go to school” there is a possibility for her to go to school in the present or in the future. “She could have gone to school” there was a possibility for her to go to school in the past


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It was a step toward independence and get rid of foreign interference, but it might went too ideological on this ground. should be: It was a step toward independence and got rid of foreign interference, but it might have been too ideological. Past tense of might: might have been might have seen might have gone might have walked might + have + past ...


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As it turns out, “shall” is not a word of obligation. The Supreme Court of the United States ruled that “shall” really means “may” – quite a surprise to attorneys who were taught in law school that “shall” means “must”. In fact, “must” is the only word that imposes a legal obligation that something is mandatory. 27 Jan 2019


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perfect infinitive means one tense earlier than the main verb tense. You have to pass (now) You had to pass (past) You have to have passed (should have passed before now, i.e., in the past)- have to (present)- have passed(in the past) You had to have passed (should have passed before in the past, i.e., in the distant past)- had to(past) - have passed(in the ...


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Morphologically, "would" is past tense (and grammatically, it serves as the past tense of "will"). In practice, it is used as though it were both present tense and past tense: PRESENT: I would like a cup of tea. PAST: I said that I would like a cup of tea. (Cf I said that I wanted...) PAST: I wondered whether he would like a cup of tea. ...


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flower is a countable noun and you need "a" or "the" or just a plural form of "flowers" ex. boy: A boy is playing on the ground. Boys are playing on the ground. The boy is playing on the ground or The boys are playing on the ground. But 'Boy is playing on the ground' is not correct. 'May' is just an auxiliary verb which needs an ...


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In your example, might indicates what is or was expected. Still, dislike him as they might, Abu-'Ali's neighbours and kinsmen also held him in fear. The children of the hamlet were always careful to be discreet when they mimicked him: they would look up and down the lanes to make sure that neither he nor his burly eldest son, 'Ali, were in sight... This ...


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