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42 votes

Why use an adjective after a noun?

Rather than Noun + Adjective, it can be thought of as Noun that is Adj, which uses relative clause but that is is omitted. We always have to go to, you know, someplace that is nice. Is there ...
ChocolateOverflow's user avatar
22 votes
Accepted

What's the difference between "might..." and "might potentially... "?

In general, might potentially V is redundant for any verb V; the potentially is unnecessary. (Although, syntactically, potentially binds to V, it’s its juxtaposition with might that creates the ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
15 votes
Accepted

Why use an adjective after a noun?

There are two possible mechanisms that could explain the position of the adjective in the example sentences that you provided: postpositive adjectives and whiz-deletion. When you apply an adjective ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
15 votes

What's the difference between "might..." and "might potentially... "?

The two sentences are similar, but not the same. In your first sentence, the word "potentially" modifies "create" and adds a nuance of unlikelihood to the possibility that oil will ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
12 votes
Accepted

Which of either of "too" and "so" to use in "His eyes were ...... bad that . . . "?

too = excessively so = to such a degree We serve only the freshest bread to our customers. This bread is too stale to be served. It has gone beyond or exceeded a certain degree of staleness. ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
10 votes

Articles before modified proper nouns

It would not be strictly incorrect to drop the articles, however written with the articles, it is a bit like saying "a version of Hermione that is interested" and "a version of Ron who is thoroughly ...
Neil's user avatar
  • 1,972
8 votes

Is "chicken" a modifier in "chicken soup"?

It sounds like you're asking for an answer in terms of CGEL terminology. Since you asked on ELL, though, I'll write you an answer targeted at someone learning English rather than learning CGEL. I ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
  • 27.6k
7 votes
Accepted

Articles before modified proper nouns

If Hermione is skeptical under the present circumstances: Harry headed to the trophy room accompanied by a skeptical Hermione. The indefinite article implies, or at least it leaves open the ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
6 votes
Accepted

When can we use 'much' in affirmative clauses?

It depends how you use much. Looking at the first sentence you quoted, it is clear that much qualifies the comparative adverb faster. She runs much faster than he does. If you use the simple ...
JavaLatte's user avatar
  • 59.9k
6 votes
Accepted

What is the main noun in "a year's worth of learning" in the following sentence?

I agree with Andrew that @BillJ really deserves the bounty for having fully answered the question. Since his and Hector's post both seem to miss Mr J's point, however, I'll mention that this is ...
lly's user avatar
  • 4,901
6 votes

What's the difference between "might..." and "might potentially... "?

While they do seem similar, and in the end do say the same thing, it's not the same. "Might" is only saying that it's POSSIBLE. "Might potentially" however, says its possible, but ...
ema's user avatar
  • 136
5 votes
Accepted

"I cut it by hand" - what is "by hand"? (Grammatically)

By hand is not any kind of verb.† It's an ordinary preposition phrase modifying the verb phrase cut it, describing the manner or means of cutting. Because it modifies a verb phrase in the same ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Thanks to the newly (purchasing/ purchased) printer,

"purchased" is correct. It refers to an action that has been completed - The printer has been/was purchased. The continuous tense can't be used in this context - "a purchasing printer" is the one ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
  • 25.1k
4 votes

Some shepherds came up, bringing with them a man

The participle phrase headed by bringing can be understood to modify the previous clause some shepherds came up. We need not think that it must attach to a single word in that clause, whether that be ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
4 votes

Which of either of "too" and "so" to use in "His eyes were ...... bad that . . . "?

If you have a particular quality to such a great extent that something isn't possible, you can express this idea by using either so or too, but the structure of the sentence in both cases will be ...
Khan's user avatar
  • 27.2k
4 votes

Was "than" omitted in "1000 times [than] their actual size"?

"1000 times" doesn't need an extra than. than is use for comparison on what's on the left and what's on the right. "1000 times" already mentions the difference. "times" ...
U13-Forward's user avatar
  • 2,107
4 votes

What does 'ever' modify?

Short answer - it modifies 'first'. It is very common to say something is the 'first ever' to make it clear that it is the absolute first. For example, what would you think if someone asked "what ...
Astralbee's user avatar
  • 103k
4 votes

Question about adverbs and what they modify

'Always' is qualifying the copular independent clause (here, also the matrix sentence) 'I am hungry'; this is a typical adverbial usage. It adds temporal detail to the statement 'I am hungry'. It ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
4 votes

How about 'participating something in '?

I think there are two ways of interpreting the second sentence. Audience members participating in the music-making process can enhance the level of engagement and enjoyment for everyone involved. In ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

The use of the word nearly

'nearly' can be read to modify a different element of each sentence. He earned nearly $100. 'nearly' modifies the $100 amount. Therefore the sentence can be read as 'he earned an amount slightly ...
mike's user avatar
  • 9,853
3 votes
Accepted

Misplaced modifier

[Although he was primarily] An expert on Diptera and fossil insects, Henning's ideas were applicable to all organisms [not just Diptera and insects]. The first part of this sentence is an ...
laugh salutes Monica C's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Could someone help me about this hearing : sanctions resolution has/have

Let's do an answer that goes beyond correcting what you thought you heard... "... it's the toughest sanctions resolution that has been put forward in more than two decades" - "sanctions" used ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
3 votes

Comparitive degree as a Modifier!

I'm a native speaker and an English teacher. Since I don't know the context or the intended use of the sentence, it's a little hard to answer. If you want to restate it without the comparative, ...
Jessica M's user avatar
  • 466
3 votes

"Science books" vs. "Scientific books"

Looking at your two examples: The book itself is not scientific, but its subject is science. The cells are not nervous, but are the type occurring in a nerve. Some more examples which make the use ...
Weather Vane's user avatar
  • 16.5k
3 votes
Accepted

Is it possible to have two adverbs on both side of verbs, and simultaneously modify or describe the same verb?

But to think of it as "on both sides of the verb" is not the best way to understand it. It is not that the speeches are reproduced regularly AND that the speeches are reproduced verbatim, rather it ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 126k
3 votes
Accepted

Use of unlike at the beginning of sentence

You're right and your friend is wrong. The problem is the full-stop (period) after almost clean. This means that what follows is not a sentence but just a clause. It would be a sentence if it read: ...
Ronald Sole's user avatar
  • 25.8k
3 votes

“A slow moving” vs. “A slowly moving”

They are both correct and mean almost the same thing, but with a very slight difference. There is a slow-moving vehicle ahead. By using the compound adjective "slow-moving," you are implying that ...
Canadian Yankee's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

why is this answer choice (C) wrong — an SAT problem

Let us take a look at the C option, which would make the sentence read as follows: Toni Morrison is one of America's outstanding authors famous for her critical essays, her novels, and her frequent ...
Eddie Kal's user avatar
  • 18.9k
3 votes

What's the difference between "I feel much happy now" and "I feel much happier now"?

Your first one is incorrect, your second one is correct. The first one doesn't have any meaning, since it's incorrect. No; see answer to No. 1. We don't use much with an adjective except in the ...
BobRodes's user avatar
  • 15k
3 votes
Accepted

Volunteer/Candidate as Modifiers?

Volunteer can be an adjective meaning "being or engaged by volunteers". So calling someone a "volunteer student" is correct. "Student volunteer" is also correct. Idiomatically, it depends on which ...
JRodge01's user avatar
  • 584

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