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22 votes
Accepted

What's the difference between "might..." and "might potentially... "?

In general, might potentially V is redundant for any verb V; the potentially is unnecessary. (Although, syntactically, potentially binds to V, it’s its juxtaposition with might that creates the ...
Paul Tanenbaum's user avatar
15 votes

What's the difference between "might..." and "might potentially... "?

The two sentences are similar, but not the same. In your first sentence, the word "potentially" modifies "create" and adds a nuance of unlikelihood to the possibility that oil will ...
gotube's user avatar
  • 50.9k
6 votes

What's the difference between "might..." and "might potentially... "?

While they do seem similar, and in the end do say the same thing, it's not the same. "Might" is only saying that it's POSSIBLE. "Might potentially" however, says its possible, but ...
ema's user avatar
  • 146
4 votes

How about 'participating something in '?

I think there are two ways of interpreting the second sentence. Audience members participating in the music-making process can enhance the level of engagement and enjoyment for everyone involved. In ...
Peter Shor 's user avatar
4 votes

Question about adverbs and what they modify

'Always' is qualifying the copular independent clause (here, also the matrix sentence) 'I am hungry'; this is a typical adverbial usage. It adds temporal detail to the statement 'I am hungry'. It ...
Edwin Ashworth's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

"I have a conversation about chemistry"

I had [a conversation about chemistry]. "A conversation about chemistry" is a constituent, a noun phrase, in which the preposition phrase "about chemistry" modifies "...
BillJ's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

What does "with trolls" modify in "I have a special gift with trolls"?

"Have a gift" mean "I have a natural skill". You might say "He has a gift for mathematics." or "He is gifted at mathematics". Quirrell is specially skilled at ...
James K's user avatar
  • 225k
2 votes

"To take a walk to home"

I think you're asking the wrong question. I'm going to use "I took a trip to France" for my answer, as "I took a trip to home" is non-idiomatic. There are at least two reasonable ...
James K's user avatar
  • 225k
2 votes

How about 'participating something in '?

[1] [Participating audience members in the music-making process] can enhance the level of engagement and enjoyment for everyone involved. [2] [Audience members participating in the music-making ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
1 vote

How about 'participating something in '?

I would understand the original sentence to mean When audience members participate in the music-making process, it can enhance the level of... enjoyment for everyone. Participate means 'take part, ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 56.1k
1 vote

a lot of books ('a lot of' books or a lot 'of books')

a lot of books There is no modifier in this noun phrase. "Lot" is a non-count quantification noun functioning as head of the noun phrase. The determiner "a" simply marks the noun ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
1 vote

"It looked not (very) large." is correct with "very" but incorrect without, right?

The most likely thing a native speaker would do is this: It somehow sounded [ not quite right ]would be expressed as: It somehow didn't sound quite right. And I find his story [ not wholly convincing ...
Lambie's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

"To take a walk to home"

Yes, you are correct here. The verb "take" has a number of meanings. "I took the medicine" can mean I swallowed it, or it can mean I carried it away from where it was. "I took ...
Peter's user avatar
  • 7,537
1 vote

What's the difference between "might..." and "might potentially... "?

Here's another way to think about this. We use words to convey a range of probabilities. I assume this is true across languages. If asked out of context, I think that probably on its own means a ...
Weiwen Ng's user avatar
  • 179
1 vote

"I have a conversation about chemistry"

I had a conversation about chemistry. about chemistry can't modify had. The phrase also can't be moved as it is adjectival here. To make the phrase modify a verb, we could restructure the sentence: ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

In this context "Possibly" is modifying what?

Possibly is a 'modifier of uncertainty'* [a term I just made up.] Like 'potentially', 'perhaps', 'might' or 'maybe' it's one of those words** someone uses when they think or estimate a situation has a ...
DoneWithThis.'s user avatar
1 vote

What's the difference between "might..." and "might potentially... "?

I would see Option 2 newly available oil might create a drop in prices. as a simple statement of what may happen. If there is new oil, there may be a drop in prices. This could be referring to ...
Dragonel's user avatar
  • 229
1 vote

What's the difference between "might..." and "might potentially... "?

I don't think this is redundant. By using two words to indicate uncertainty, in a situation where there are two possible sources of uncertainty, you emphasise that both apply. So I would interpret ...
Especially Lime's user avatar
1 vote

What's the difference between "might..." and "might potentially... "?

potentially modifies create here. As might already indicates possibility, potentially is not needed, and your two examples have similar meanings. 2 used to say that something is possible We might get ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote

Participle phrase as adjunct or modifier

Revolution broke out in France in 1789, [most cogently symbolised then as now by the storming of the Bastille on 14 July]. I'd take the bracketed clause as a supplementary adjunct. Supplements are ...
BillJ's user avatar
  • 17.1k
1 vote

What is this kind of phrase called?

I'd say this is an absolute construction. Normally, it has a non-finite clause as a verb, but in this case it is verbless. Compare: "..., a crime being punishable.." As a supplement, it is ...
user424874's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

What's the meaning of "community involvement"?

As with many noun adjuncts, the combination of nouns forms a compound with a lexical meaning of its own. The meaning, in this case, could be glossed as "involvement of the community", where ...
James K's user avatar
  • 225k
1 vote

Is there an implicit "the" in this sentence?

Both are correct. They have very, very slightly different connotations. First, if the second "the" was left out: The Big E and Topsfield Fair are coming. we should realize that the "...
BigMistake's user avatar
  • 1,122
1 vote

Is there an implicit "the" in this sentence?

There is quite a bit of variation in how Topsfield Fair is referred to. Browsing google, I can find "Topsfield Fair", "Topsfield fair", and "the Topsfield fair". But he ...
James K's user avatar
  • 225k

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