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53

There are as many answers to this as there are situations. In informal settings, one might only give their first name. So, if I'm at a bar and I start chatting with someone, I would usually only give my first name... or if I'm being introduced to new people by friends, I'll only give my first name. In formal or business settings, one might give both first ...


41

The "kh" is not meant to be understood as a sequence of "k" followed by "h". The idea is that it is a digraph where both letters together represent the single sound of Russian х. It is used by analogy with the English digraphs "th" and "ph", which also are used to represent single fricative sounds. (Those digraphs are based in part on old traditions about ...


29

You should not use the in The war campaign has shot up Putin's ratings. Yes, the noun "ratings" is definite, but it already has a word that indicates whose ratings they are: Putin's ratings. You may think of it as The war campaign has shot up his ratings. Words like "his, her, their" are called "possessive determiners". The definite article "the" ...


28

The primary reason is "that's the way it's done". You can't say that "Mikhail" is pronounced correctly while "Mihail" wouldn't be, because all English speakers get both of them horribly wrong. But if you transcribe Михаил as "Mikhail" you are at least consistent with other transliterations. In theory the Russian letter "х" is pronounced slightly differently ...


22

In the United States it is not very common to lead with your last name when introducing yourself. Mostly, this will happen in situations where what you are is more important than who you are, and will generally drop the first name altogether. A good example of this is a police officer, who will only commonly introduce themselves using their first name in ...


15

TL/DR: Use "full name" in your case. Here's why: "Real name" (or "actual name") is a little strange if they know you personally in real life†. Does that mean that you've been letting them call you something that's not your real name? Best not to get into that. The only other exception to this would be if they've only recently been introduced to you by that ...


14

The general template for an Anglophone name is: Title Given-name(s) Surname "White" is his surname. Surnames are family names and are generally inherited. Traditionally this has been focussed on the male line - a woman would take the man's surname when they marry, and their children would usually take the man's surname too. (This is not entirely ...


13

Because the Russian x has a different sound (IPA /x/) from /h/ While many English speakers don't know how to pronounce /x/, many do. But to some degree, transliteration between languages is arbitrary and follows fashion. We write Tschaikovsky with a T because that's how French and German represent the sound: "Chaykovsky" or "Chaikovsky" would better ...


13

Historically, when Russian names have been transliterated into the Latin alphabet, the most important target language was French rather than English. For example, the Wikipedia page for Romanization of Russian says that in "Soviet international passports, transliteration was based on French rules (but without diacritics), so all of the names were ...


12

A name like Tweety can be a problem when you start your career. It is a suitable nickname for friends, but it could cause some business people to take you less seriously than if you used a more common name because they will think of the silly cartoon character when they see your name. I think that your teacher is giving you good advice, and that a less cute ...


11

Usually, when someone introduces themselves, they give either a first name, or a first name followed by their last name. In other words, they'll say something like one of these lines: Hello, I'm Joe. Hello, my name is Joe Smith. There are a few instances, though, where someone might be inclined to give their last name first. For example, people in ...


11

I wanted to know if it was possible to call a child Jack Watson Junior if his father is called Charles Watson? No; junior and senior are only used if the names are exactly the same. Or is it possible to name a child Jack Watson Junior in honor of his uncle for example or his grandfather who would be called Jack Watson? Technically, a child named after a ...


11

Cyrillic transliteration is usually formulaic, where every Cyrillic letter corresponds exactly to some letter or combination of Roman letters. Most of these are quite sensible and would only rarely cause avoidable mistakes. There are, however, some problematic combinations, one of which you've run into. KH = x. Kharkov would really be Harkov or Harkiv. ...


11

Since the differences in pronunciation have been thoroughly discussed, I'd like to point one the consistency of transliteration. The spelling Mikhail simply follows the common convention "х=kh". From this perspective, asking why it is not spelt Mihail boils down to why the Cyrillic х is not rendered as h, and I think there's a fairly straightforward answer ...


10

First of all, it's actually John Doe, not Joe Doe, and the female equivalent is Jane Doe. And no, what's-his-name/what's-her-name is by far the most common option for referring to people whose name you can't remember. The common alternative is to identify the person without using a name at all: I saw that girl yesterday, that one who hit you with her car. ...


10

Short answer: you can't. There is no reliable rule that will cover all the various languages and exceptions and parents who name their daughter Maxwell and their son Andrea. Longer answer: The bad news is, the -a vs. -o ending rule has so many exceptions that it's useless. Bella is female, but Bela (well, technically Béla) is male; Andrea is male in Italy ...


10

Wade Wilson's nom de guerre is one word, Deadpool; this was his name in the comic books long before the film was made. In the film, treating it as if it were an ordinary name, "Dead Pool", is a joke: the cabbie uses it because Wade introduces himself as "Pool. Dead", echoing the famous line "Bond. James Bond" line and (as we find out later) echoing his ...


8

I'm going to assume you mean "associations" not "assassinations", but let's cover a few things first. Car names are not great examples of exact english. They contain made up words, words only used because they sound good, and random numbers. So "Range Rovers" are meant to be all time 4 wheel drive vehicles that can do decently in offroading. A "...


7

Here in the UK, we don't expect Chinese-speakers should have an English name (although of course we know that many do). Therefore, if you said "my name is Tweety" but we knew you had a Chinese name, then I think we'd usually treat Tweety as a nickname and Chia Yin as your "real name". "Tweety" might raise eyebrows or attract a few comments, but ultimately ...


7

As a place name, 'square one' would not take an article. Go back to square one. I'm on square one of my journey. However, Go back to the square one. ...is perfectly fine depending on the context and inflection. By emphasizing 'square', you are saying go the square version of some thing, as opposed to the round one. Your finger is on the round button, ...


7

Officially, the status of the words Czech, Czechia, Czech Republic is indeed absolutely analogous to Slovak, Slovakia, Slovak Republic. The new Czech ministry of foreign affairs made Czechia the official name in early 1993 when Czechoslovakia split, along with the politicial official name the Czech Republic. The only problem was that "one name" of the ...


7

There are some examples of English films that have unnamed main characters. When mentioning the character we normally refer to them as their job or title such as The Driver The Teacher The Cop Or simply by their function in the story: The Hero The Protagonist The Villain You can use those to refer to an unnamed character without needing to explain that ...


6

The image this idiom evokes is a board game with a sequence of 'squares' which players traverse. In the context of a sequence or ordered list we ordinarily refer to individual numbered items by Item + Number, with no article, because it is a unique identifier—in effect, a "name": We will deal with this in more detail in Section 3.4. Illustration ...


6

Basically, you can have people call you whatever name you want. If you introduce yourself, you can either state your legal name, followed by how you want to be called (appropriate for semi-formal settings, like starting a new job) "My name is FirstName LastName, but you can call me NickName." in informal settings, just give your nickname: "Hi, I'm ...


6

I agree with your teacher. "Tweety" is not a good choice for a professional name. The name is very closely associated with a cartoon character, PLUS it sounds very informal. It uses the word "tweet", which means the sound that birds make, followed by the ending "-y", which typically means "little" or "suitable for a child". So this is a doubly-belittling ...


6

Bond is British, and movies about super spies are not a good place to gather behavior characteristics about the average person. The answer is: there is no answer as to why they say this, because they don't say this.


5

If the name begins with "Mr" it's a male, if it begins with "Ms", "Mrs" or "Miss" it's a female.


5

My full name is Maulik Bipinbhai Vyas works in most of the registers as far as my knowledge goes. Because, calling your first name, middle name and surname a 'full name' is universal. full name: - your whole name, including your first name, middle name, and family name However, there may be many other ways to tell this.


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