5 votes

Only now "are" technological advances beginning to offer hope

This is a noun phrase, merely a sentence fragment: Technological advances beginning to offer hope... To make it a valid sentence we need a finite (tensed) verb: Technological advances are ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
4 votes
Accepted

Never did I see her again

The 'natural' way to say it is "I never saw her again". Putting never at the beginning is a literary/formal way to emphasise the word. The difference between (a) and (b) is a matter of ...
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 54.7k
4 votes
Accepted

Only now "are" technological advances beginning to offer hope

The verb BE is necessary here because the clause uses a present continuous construction. She is talking Technological advances are beginning ... In the second example we see the verb are agreeing ...
Araucaria - Not here any more.'s user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

How is the structure " Never have I been"?

The meaning is: I have never been so glad to see anyone in my life. We invert the order of the subject (I) and the auxiliary verb (have) to make the sentence more emphatic. The speaker is very ...
CowperKettle's user avatar
  • 36.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Why does negative inversion not occur in some sentences but similar ones?

In no time he will have permission. In this example we're not negating the main action. He will have permission. In fact, he will obtain it very quickly ("in no time"). We could also say &...
The Photon's user avatar
  • 10.4k
3 votes

What is negative inversion for "She made no sound as she crept upstairs"?

No sound did she made as she crept upstairs No, it's not quite correct. It should be "No sound did she make..." - not "made". When you invert, you have to add do-support. So ...
rjpond's user avatar
  • 23.1k
3 votes
Accepted

not every day (do) you get a chance to

The original sentence is an instance of conversational deletion, with It's deleted: It's not every day you get a chance to meet your hero. But the deletion is 'licensed' because "It's not every ...
StoneyB on hiatus's user avatar
2 votes

Only once did I see any elephant

From my initial comment to the answer, I think it's called fronting (with do-support). That's because I assume the basic sentence is I saw an elephant - converted to I did see an elephant, and ...
FumbleFingers's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Is the subject-verb inversion in this sentence correct?

It is correct, if a little fancy/antiquated. Normally, in most common form this sentence would go: She does not always mean good, and she is not always overt as to her real meaning. Following a ...
SF.'s user avatar
  • 10.2k
2 votes

What is the function of "do" in this sentence?

This is an example of inversion. In formal styles, when a "negative" adverb (such as "rarely" or "never") is used in the front position (for emphasis) the subject and verb are inverted. Never have ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
2 votes

What is this actually saying? Written sentence: “This is not a story about wine, well not totally.”

There is no double negative. The first sentence contains a literal negative "This is not a story about wine." The second sentence qualifies that with an adverb. The second sentence is made short, ...
James K's user avatar
  • 219k
2 votes
Accepted

Inversion of a negative sentence including there

First of all, the given example: "If there had not been modern communication platforms across the globe, there could have not been any scientific progress." should more correctly be phrased ...
David Siegel's user avatar
  • 41.1k
2 votes

Subject-operator inversion

There is an article from Lund University in Sweden that explains: The inverted order only occurs when the whole clause is affected by the initial negation/restriction. Thus, there are cases where ...
RuslanD's user avatar
  • 2,295
2 votes

'Not' before a noun subject in a question

Your friend is wrong to condemn "Does the boy not go to school every day."* In fact, if you wanted to add an intensifier, you'd have to use this form rather than the contraction: "Does ...
Andy Bonner's user avatar
  • 13.4k
2 votes

Does it not work vs Does not it work

Why doesn't it work is often used in the abbreviated form, but when not using this, you would use Why does it not work. Why does not it work is not grammatically correct.
taylor.2317's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

·What does the second sentence in this paragraph mean?

Antiques bought as an investment twenty years ago have only recently begun to increase in value. So, if you need a quick return on your investments, don't invest in antiques.
Kate Bunting's user avatar
  • 54.7k
2 votes
Accepted

"For no money would she leave" vs "For no money she would leave"

Yes, they are different. With a preposed negative adverbial like for no money, we expect the sentence to be inverted, the preposed adverbial has an emphatic reading, and the main clause is within the ...
Colin Fine's user avatar
  • 75.3k
1 vote

I don't... neither am I in one sentence

Because "neither" is not usually considered a coordinating conjunction, your sentence could be criticized for containing a comma splice. It would be better to use a common coordinating ...
MarcInManhattan's user avatar
1 vote

Does it not work vs Does not it work

Why does it not work? Why does not it work? As commented and answered earlier, the first example is right. englishgrammar explains further; 'contracted and uncontracted negative questions have ...
Seowjooheng Singapore's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

How to invert if-clause in continuous form?

"Should" conditionals refer to an uncertain situation. The most common usage is with a following imperative: Should you run into difficulties, don't hesitate to contact me. But in formal ...
rjpond's user avatar
  • 23.1k
1 vote
Accepted

Weren't+subject ... and Were+subject+not ... are they both correct for inverted conditionals?

In this case, the program is correct Can we write: Weren't Elsa a brave girl, she wouldn't go with us. No. That is non-standard Weren't we so clever, we wouldn't have got the contract. Again, this ...
Kevin's user avatar
  • 8,014
1 vote

Inversion in the adverbial clause

This is a subject-auxiliary inversion and it occurs in the main clause. I don't see how it occurs in a subordinate clause. The inversion is triggered by the initial Only. If you remove it or place it ...
Mohd Zulkanien Sarbini's user avatar
1 vote

"once in a blue moon" and "rarely"

"Rarely" does not always require inversion. For instance, one can say "He rarely works at night". "Once in a blue moon" does not take inversion by itself, but you can use ...
Acccumulation's user avatar
1 vote

"once in a blue moon" and "rarely"

Both Rarely, he works at night and Once in a blue moon, he works at night. are grammatical. Inversion is not required.
Mary's user avatar
  • 5,145
1 vote

What is this actually saying? Written sentence: “This is not a story about wine, well not totally.”

The sentence means there will definitely be wine in the story, and that wine will even very likely play a central role in the story, but that it shouldn't be seen as a story only about wine.
Splambo's user avatar
  • 137
1 vote

What is this actually saying? Written sentence: “This is not a story about wine, well not totally.”

As you note, this is intended to be a joke, or at least, a witty remark. Jokes are notoriously hard to analyze. Word something one way and it can be a very funny joke. Say the same thing in different ...
Jay's user avatar
  • 65.6k
1 vote

Does this sentence make sense: "So many women have never received economic degrees as today"?

It is an extremely awkward sentence. I doubt any native speaker would ever say it although a careless one might write it. It contains several instances of ellipsis as well as a strained word order as ...
Jeff Morrow's user avatar
  • 32.1k
1 vote
Accepted

Does this sentence make sense: "So many women have never received economic degrees as today"?

A clause that begins with Never has subject-verb inversion, the tensed auxiliary verb coming before the subject: Never had tensed verb we subject seen such a strange sight. A. never have so many ...
TimR's user avatar
  • 124k
1 vote

Does this sentence make sense: "So many women have never received economic degrees as today"?

I would say that you are right in saying that A is the only correct option for a couple reasons. In this instance, the word "never" changes the meaning of the sentence depending on what it is in front ...
user67122's user avatar
1 vote

"Only a little money I have", "Only a little money do I have"

"A few money" is definitely incorrect; "Only a little money do I have" may be correct but sounds very awkward to me. It also sounds very dated, much more so than "Little did I know/dream/expect". I'm ...
Oosaka's user avatar
  • 311

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible