25

"I" is correct. The speaker is the subject of the sentence, the one performing the action, and so you use the subject version of the pronoun. You use "me" when the speaker is the object, the person being acted on. Like, "Bob asked me to go fishing." Normally in English when there are several people mentioned in a sentence, one of whom is the speaker, you ...


10

In English we can only have one central Determiner in a noun phrase. Determiners are usually words like a, the, no, some, any, which, my, your, his, her and so forth. Because we can only have one of these words in a noun phrase we cannot say things like: *a my friend *that your friend *which Bob's friend? The noun phrases above are all ungrammatical in ...


7

The subject is "mutations", so a plural verb "result" is expected, and normal. Having said that, the closer noun often does exert some influence, and you will hear the singular "results", particularly in informal contexts. Some people castigate this use as "wrong".


7

It sounds like you're asking for an answer in terms of CGEL terminology. Since you asked on ELL, though, I'll write you an answer targeted at someone learning English rather than learning CGEL. I offer no rules here, only an explanation of what's going on. It's probably not what you're looking for qua linguist, but hopefully you'll find it useful qua learner ...


6

What I imagine is confusing you is the following: skunk handler : these two words together make up one person who is in charge of "handling" or "caring" for skunks. Likewise, a "snake handler" would be someone who is responsible for taking care of snakes. Thus, the clothing belonging to the skunk handler (or skunk handler's clothing) is extremely smelly ...


6

It is a noun phrase, and the subject of the sentence. It is not a clause, but it contains one. The noun phrase has a noun "the way" and a relative clause; "we are learning English" is the relative clause, it describes the noun "way". You could also write "The way that we are learning English". The word "is" is the main verb (not an auxiliary) and "not good"...


5

John and I drove to the beach in his car. Jane came with John and me on our trip to the beach.


5

Let's take the easy part first. What you're talking about is a clinic belonging to Springfield Hospital, and so you properly use the possessive form (in English you don't normally call it the "genitive" as you would in more highly inflected language). Let's simplify the phrase by using a simpler possessive: "my." This gives you: My ...


5

Enough, in this sentence, is part of a noun phrase, which is two or more words that grouped together act like a noun. That's what the abbreviation "NP" in the sentence you quoted means. The Wikipedia article goes into more detail. As for the meaning of the noun phrase, here it indicates that the subject of the sentence isn't sufficiently educated, and ...


4

The nucleus is a cell organelle. or The nucleus is an organelle in a cell.


4

Whether you use a possessive with apostrophe-s ("Bulbul bird's beak") or a noun adjunct ("Bulbul bird beak") depends on how you wish the phrase to be used. If you are describing a beak that belongs to the bird or is of the bird, then use the first one. If you are generally modifying the noun's meaning, especially if referring to Bulbul birds' beaks in ...


4

The construction "a friend of mine" is known as double genitive and is used to mean that you have other friends, as opposed to "my friend" (you have only one friend, or that person is the one you consider as your friend at the time). "*a friend mine" is ungrammatical. Note: The term "double genitive" is used by Quirk in his "Comprehensive Grammar of the ...


4

Possessives that go after the noun they modify with an "of": (mine, yours, ours, theirs, his, hers, ...) can also be used with linking verbs: It was mine. ==> It was a book of mine. It will be yours. ==> It will be a book of yours. Possessives that go just before the noun they modify (my, your, our, their, his, her, ...) aren't used in the "of" ...


4

The one having a blue pen is grammatically impeccable, but impossibly literary. This sort of utterance is unlikely to appear in a formal context, and practically no Anglo-American speaker today (and very few in the past) would express that meaning with having. We'd say The one with a blue pen. And even that is fairly stiff: in actual speech pronominal ...


4

*The one having a blue pen. (ungrammatical with this meaning) The sentence above would be regarded as ungrammatical by most native speakers when used to convey the meaning the one who has a blue pen. It uses an -ing clause having a blue pen to modify the common noun one. Why would people consider it ungrammatical? That's a good question! We can split ...


4

It is better if you look at this as a single noun phrase rather than "two words in plural." The main word in this noun phrase is "structure". It can then be put into plural irrespective of what its modifier (dependency/dependencies) is. A structure is a relationship between multiple components. Thus, the singular form of your noun phrase is "dependencies ...


4

"A small antelope similar to the chamois" means "A small antelope which is similar to the chamois". The words "similar to the chamois" are an adjective-phrase describing the antelope.


4

"Payment cash," while an unusual phrase, ought to mean "the cash which is used for the payment." The phrase "cash payment" is more common, and means "the payment which is in the form of cash," emphasizing that other forms of payment are not acceptable. If the intent is to emphasize that only cash is acceptable, the ...


3

From the context, "preference data" could mean either: Data about how the user prefers their application's user interface to look and feel. In the past, this data was stored in "configuration files" or "registry hives". Web sites often stored this data as "cookies". Data about what customers prefer to buy, or what ads are most interesting to people who ...


3

The word conclusion can refer to either: 1.1 The summing-up of an argument or text: in the conclusion we highlight these and other important issues or 2.0 A judgement or decision reached by reasoning: each research group came to a similar conclusion In other words it can be the last section of a piece of writing, or it can be a decision you make ...


3

No, I'm afraid you can't. The order can't really be changed; "a pair of" is a fixed expression. Your only option is A pair of shoes / Two pairs of shoes If the word describing a pair is an adjective, then it can be used similarly to in your question. (Game of "pairs") A correct pair Lastly, I would mention that we can use a possessive pronoun + ...


3

You are correct, this is a usage of turn usually reserved to describe political or social changes. In the first example, the "turn to" social media is being used to abbreviate "recent trends indicating the rise in importance of" social media. In the second, the "recent turn to" conservationism refers to a rise in the amount of ...


3

You're mostly right; but the the main clause needs a little explaining. It employs a construction called a cleft as an "information packaging" device, rearranging the constituents of the underlying simple clause to emphasize these things The "original" clause here is this: And I believe in these things ... To emphasize these things we start with a ...


3

The word day in day one is a noun. The expression day one is quite common. This is quite similar to a countdown during a rocket launch, where the last 10 seconds countdown is usually announced "T-minus 10, 9, 8, ..., 3, 2, 1". Day One usually refers to the first day of some operation or activity. You can even have Day-minus too. For example, the well-known ...


3

As snailboat points it out, the word bonhomie is not normally used to convey the 'thanks!' for any wishes. In your sentence, the word seems to be used as a adjective, whereas it's actually a noun. bonhomie - a feeling of cheerful friendship Down there, the noun is used this way There was a casual bonhomie between the actors at rehearsals. If you ...


3

Both of these sentences are correct. The huge 747 plunged through dense cloud cover on approach to Hamburg airport. The "cloud cover" is used as a noun in this sentence. The use of such sentences is quite common among personals of Air Traffic Control Department. The huge 747 plunged though dense cloud covering on the approach to Hamburg airport. ...


3

Here is a simplified tree of the OP's sentence, which clearly shows that syntactically the complement "not good" belongs in the predicate VP, not the subject NP. The complement is required to complete the verb phrase and hence is complement of the verb.


3

There is nothing wrong with your phrase. their previously washed clothes their (adjective) previously (adverb) washed (adjective) clothes (noun) also our previously worn socks the previously read books the completely cooked pork


3

Both of these options are grammatically correct. However, if you have to pick between the two, the second option sounds a bit better. i.e. The charts provided illustrate the information about employment.


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